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Thread: Trees for the future

  1. #1
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    Default Trees for the future

    This great city was once a forest as far as the eye could see. I feel that planting a new tree to represent every citizen here in Edmonton would be a wonderful idea. The environment is of concern and has been in the media for years. Protecting and saving the environment is important, this would bring a great awareness to the city both as a global renewal plan and a beautification project. The types of trees could be one special species that thrives here or one that is in danger of being lost to the diseases. The mighty maple may be good for representing each Edmontonian and a strong Canadian symbol.

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    I agree, but I so don't want this to be just a government project. Then, no one takes the pride in ownership if we don't all pitch in.

    I'd gladly buy a tree and have it planted along the Whitemud, or in a park, or wherever one is needed. I especially like the tower poplars, they seem to thrive well here and get leaves early and keep them much much much longer.
    Tired of being taken advantage of .

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    i'd like to see 1000 trees planted in the downtown and area.
    www.decl.org

    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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    I like the idea of planting trees. However I would also like to see some creativity to go along. Last september I was driving down 97th street north of 137th ave when the Amur Maples were in full colour. I could not believe the number of people who stopped along the road to have their picture taken with these trees as a background. These trees have been there for years and I am sure everyone knows about them. What seems odd to me is that no one has tried to replicate a similar scene. I think that should be the focus of a tree planting campaign, create distinctive landmarks around the city.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenco
    I like the idea of planting trees. However I would also like to see some creativity to go along. Last september I was driving down 97th street north of 137th ave when the Amur Maples were in full colour. I could not believe the number of people who stopped along the road to have their picture taken with these trees as a background. These trees have been there for years and I am sure everyone knows about them. What seems odd to me is that no one has tried to replicate a similar scene. I think that should be the focus of a tree planting campaign, create distinctive landmarks around the city.

    yup every fall that stretch is packed with family photo ops and couple shots.

    Imagine that along other stretches of roadway or even downtown.

    How about those trees along the new 105ave BLVD
    www.decl.org

    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenco
    (...). However I would also like to see some creativity to go along. Last september I was driving down 97th street north of 137th ave when the Amur Maples were in full colour.
    You mean these...





    Tired of being taken advantage of .

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    I would love an abundance of trees and loads of flower beds, too. Especially along our main downtown routes. Hello, Jasper Avenue. The city of Chicago is a wonderful example to follow, and their spectacular trees and flower beds are all a result of the garden-loving Mayor & Mrs Daley. Hey, if an blue-collar industrial town with horrible winters like Chicago can win the top Cities in Bloom award, then certainly Edmonton can (and it won't be because of some blue barrels & "super wave" petunias).

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    I love the idea of more trees and flowers along our major roadways. 97 Street between 137-153 Avenue is an example of how trees can beautify a neighbourhood. With the planting of more flowers would come more maintainance. I think it is something the city needs to invest more into. The better the city looks the more pride the citizens will take in their city.

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    Perhaps also stricter guidlines in new suburbs? At least one tree in the front yard, and the developer needs to add trees along every street front. (Not just the 'entrance Blvd.' to these communities)

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    a while ago someone in Great Ideas forum suggested a Cherry Blossom festival in edmonton. one of the requirements, of course, was to have many cherry trees. Come spring, these little guys look very pretty. So, perhaps, planting lots of cherry trees to line major roads

    as well, any trees that go green early intermittently with trees that shed their foliage late to give us a more green feel in spring and in fall.

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    Such a line of trees is sorely needed on Gateway Blvd, especially along the hubcap-store-industrial-blight area and north of Whyte Ave.

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    This is a great idea.

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    I love the idea, and especially appreciate the idea about the Amur Maples. We could challenge each community in the city to find a place for their trees to be planted, and make it into a program where individuals could 'fund a tree' so that the city was not stuck with the full cost. Alternatively, perhaps the Alberta Government could help fund the overall program as part of a 'Capital City Beautification' program.

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    I've written countless letters to council on this very issue. Every single time, they respond favourably but nothing happens. Apparently everybody agrees with this idea but nothing ever seems to get done about it. It's infuriating.

    Well, I shouldn't say "nothing", last year the city did plant trees all along 82nd Street and 153rd Avenue. That's a good start. I would like to see tree planting continue along the median of 97th street, Castle downs road and 137th Ave.

    O.k. I live on the north end and I'm biased, but the point is that all our major roadways throughout the city should have tree lined boulevards and medians. It makes such a huge difference in the overall look of the city. (especially if those trees are replacing overhead powerlines)

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    I'll say it again. Don't rely on the city to have to do it for us, but let's do it ourselves. Get the list of Zone 3 trees that we can plant, give me a freaking shovel, and I'll plant some tower poplars myself.
    Tired of being taken advantage of .

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    If enough people are willing to "buy" a tree and have it planted by the city to finish off some of those boulevards I mentioned I would definitely be willing to pitch in my share of cash.

    All we would need is a few people with organizational skills, some time to kill and a little familiarity with civic beauracracy to organize such a campaign.

    Anybody? Anybody?

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    Please see member alerts....that could be a short term goal...
    Tired of being taken advantage of .

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    Yeah - if I hadn't have been a City employee back when we bought our house, we'd have bought in St. Albert - mostly because of its park like atmosphere. Trees and trails everywhere - love it.

    Instead, I live in Edmonton with that nice industrial feel (we sure don't try to hide our dirty laundry - the aging, unpainted, unstained, grafitti covered fences and concrete walls). However, my own large back yard now contains a large number of trees of all kinds - many quite rare. I've even planted a trees in the walkway to replace some of the trees the city maintenance staff killed off (debarked them to keep a few blades of grass down - what a huge loss on invested capital and a huge opportunity cost too!). Seems that the City rarely replaces the trees they kill - there's little depressions all over our walkways representing lost trees.

    I love the idea of using tower popluar, columnar aspen, etc. along the freeways - they'd give Edmonton a lot more 'character' for next to no cost.

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    I have to wonder what are the native trees of Edmonton...

    (I'm looking for a list... I remember seeing a list from a gardening book published in the 60's... )

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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardS
    I'll say it again. Don't rely on the city to have to do it for us, but let's do it ourselves. Get the list of Zone 3 trees that we can plant, give me a freaking shovel, and I'll plant some tower poplars myself.
    There is a happy medium. A non-profit society set up to plant trees, but that has non-monetary support from the city, like storage and purchasing of trees using the city's account for wholesale pricing, use of city owned property for meetings, and a liaison with the city to advise on tree placement would be best. Surely to god the city has an arborist on staff....

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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardS
    I'll say it again. Don't rely on the city to have to do it for us, but let's do it ourselves. Get the list of Zone 3 trees that we can plant, give me a freaking shovel, and I'll plant some tower poplars myself.
    I also volunteer to plant trees, flowers, shrubs or whatever in order to beautify this city. I used to do landscaping in the late 80's and early 90's and I'd love to do it again, plus it will help me get rid of some of the weight I gain from working behind a desk all day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by onishenko
    Perhaps also stricter guidlines in new suburbs? At least one tree in the front yard, and the developer needs to add trees along every street front. (Not just the 'entrance Blvd.' to these communities)
    Agreed. It's very simple - move the sidewalk 2m away from the road and plant trees in between.

  23. #23

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    I image the City's past tree purchase programs have been very 'matter-of-fact', keep-it-simple, lowest cost bid, maximum hardiness, minimal species diversification (spruce, ash, elm).

    Seems the focus has always been to create a nice ‘naturalized’ look rather than something dynamic, striking and vibrant. I'd bet there never has been any consideration given to species selection and strategic, entrepreneurial landscape design that would make Edmonton to stand out among its peers.

    Here's some of my thoughts from before - basically we need to stand back and look at Edmonton through visitors' eyes to see our potential (for both economic development and quality of life reasons):

    Cherry Blossom Festival:
    http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/forum...opic.php?t=398

    Entrepreneurship:
    http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/forum...opic.php?t=427

    “This all gets back to my belief that the city could be a lot more strategic and entrepreneurial in its approach in some areas. I see planting prep. going on near WEM - Great! Finally! Some 'facilities' hurt surrounding property values and the city can offset such negative impacts by via active maintenance, if not outright enhancement of surrounding infrastructure, parks, greenstrips and boulevards. If the surrounding streets look trashy - property values fall - and commensurately - taxes revenues fall. I'm sure there's a number of areas that could be enhanced on a cost recovery basis.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by E-Town Crusader
    (...)plus it will help me get rid of some of the weight I gain from working behind a desk all day.
    oh man, I so know what you mean....
    Tired of being taken advantage of .

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by E-Town Crusader
    Quote Originally Posted by RichardS
    I'll say it again. Don't rely on the city to have to do it for us, but let's do it ourselves. Get the list of Zone 3 trees that we can plant, give me a freaking shovel, and I'll plant some tower poplars myself.
    I also volunteer to plant trees, flowers, shrubs or whatever in order to beautify this city. I used to do landscaping in the late 80's and early 90's and I'd love to do it again, plus it will help me get rid of some of the weight I gain from working behind a desk all day.
    this have given me a thought:

    make tree-planting a part of corporate "competition"--send out a challenge to our businesses to sponsor (financially or with labour) tree and flower planting on our city streets. Could make it a part of a corporate-challenge competition.

    Those who sponsor a whole street, may even be allowed to put small, tasteful signs stating: On such and such day, this corporation planted 75 trees.

    Other idea is to have them set Guiness world records for the largest number of trees planted in 15 minutes or something like that.

    A Tree Planting Festival and trade show anyone?

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    This could work..
    Tired of being taken advantage of .

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    Quote Originally Posted by grish
    Those who sponsor a whole street, may even be allowed to put small, tasteful signs stating: On such and such day, this corporation planted 75 trees.

    Other idea is to have them set Guiness world records for the largest number of trees planted in 15 minutes or something like that.
    I LOVE these ideas. Sign me up!

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    volunteer tree planting is something that was done succesfully in the past. It would be interesting to see if it could be done again.

    In the early 1900s residents of the Norwood / Parkdale / Alberta Avenue / Spruce Avenue communities undertook the task of relocating Elm trees from the St.Albert area to their new neighbourhood. The result is the beautiful tree canopy that exists today from 82 street to 101 street and from 111 avenue to north of 118 avenue.

    Planting the trees is only half of the challenge. Watering these young sapplings is almost a bigger challenge. In the above example groups of local boy scouts were given the responsibilty of watering each and every tree at the required intervals for many years.

  29. #29

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    With the new ring roads there's some wonderful new plantings - but it would be great to see the City see this as an opportunity to create a better impression of Edmonton. Make Edmonton stand out.

    A great book I have from the 80s is Alberta Trees of Renown.
    ( http://www.srd.gov.ab.ca/whatsnew/features/051016.html )

    It mentioned a long row of trees planted in Calgary by senator Burns as being very distinctive at one time.
    http://www.calgaryheritage.org/phpbb...f526dda0b1b506

    excerpt:
    Nominate a Heritage Tree
    "...remaining “Burns Trees” north of 22x on Macleod
    Trail and the Memorial Drive trees planted to honor Calgary’s
    First World War fallen."

    "So far, only 30 trees have been nominated for heritage
    recognition in Calgary..."


    On watering - I hate to see the city invest capital over many years of growing fairly large trees then planting these trees only to see that they've died within the first year or so because they didn't water properly. They could have plant hundreds of bare-root-stock for the same investment.

    Maintenance staff killed fairly large trees in our walkway by repeatedly ringed them. So there's likely a fairly substantial resulting investment loss (not to mention the opportunity cost).

    As for pioneer plantings - don't forget the huge Silver Maples by HighStreet.

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    Default Re: Trees for the future

    Quote Originally Posted by bayda
    This great city was once a forest as far as the eye could see.
    Noble quote, but that's partly inaccurate. Edmonton lies in what was once mostly an aspen parkland environment. Sure, there were indeed large tracts of forest, but not continuous forest like the boreal forest further north and west. It was interspersed with prairie grassland. In other words, it's a transitional environment between prairie and boreal forest.

    And I'd bet that between 6,000 and 8,500 years and also during the last interglacial prior to our current one, which was 125,000 years ago, the Edmonton area was likely mostly prairie. During these periods, the planet was slightly warmer than today. The Edmonton area would've probably looked not unlike what you see around present-day Drumheller or Stettler. (this is the northernmost extent of shortgrass prairie anywhere in Canada - and this is only 2 hours south of here by car!) This has serious implications for Edmonton if the current global warming keeps up.

    Quote Originally Posted by bayda
    I feel that planting a new tree to represent every citizen here in Edmonton would be a wonderful idea. The environment is of concern and has been in the media for years. Protecting and saving the environment is important, this would bring a great awareness to the city both as a global renewal plan and a beautification project. The types of trees could be one special species that thrives here or one that is in danger of being lost to the diseases. The mighty maple may be good for representing each Edmontonian and a strong Canadian symbol.
    Don't forget drought-resistant species, too, especially if the droughts in the future become worse and more frequent than what what we've been having recently. There's also an upside maintenance wise - cuts down on the water the city has to give the trees a drink every now and then.

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    Two books that I would recommend are "Woody Ornamentals for the Prairie Provinces" U of A and Lois Holes "My Favourite Trees and Shrubs". Needs updating but a pretty good reference.
    I used to own a half acre lot in north east Edmonton in Quarry Ridge. I planted apprx. 200 trees and shrubs of many varieties. As a result I have a good idea about what is suitable for growing in our area. Being on a large lot and exposed to the elements this was a good test for hardiness.
    One tree that I did not plant which is native and would be good in a mass planting in the valley somewhere for fall colour is the Tamarack or Larch. Brilliant yellow in the fall. Not suitable for city lots imo.
    The Swedish aspen is grown all over the city with some mass plantings at SEC by the entrance to the theatre. Also they are in the entrance to Rutherford. Very hardy and they grow fast, I had some I planted as six inch seedlings five years ago. They are now 15-20 feet high, Depending on the selsction some have a nice colour in the fall but not all of them. I don't know why. Far superior to the tower poplar in my opinion I'm afraid RS.
    Ohio buckeyes are very hardy and have good fall colour. There are a few around town especially the UofA but I don't know why they are not more popular. They have a dense canopy and are drought tolerent. Ideal. A close cousin, Horse Chestnut is also a good choice for large areas but I don't think it is as hardy as the Buckeye.
    The Burr Oak is another tree that is getting wider acceptance. They can be found on the east side of Canada place and on the west by the main entrance. The city planted a whole bunch along 153 ave between 66-82 street a couple of years ago. They are doing well.
    I planted two Northern Pin Oaks on my lot. They are a member of the red oak family and turn a deep red in the fall. Very nice tree that again is drought tolerent and did not show any signs of winter kill I think this tree would be spectacular if planted on mass in a park somewhere.
    Another oak that I really like is the Heritage Oak. A cross between a burr oak and an English oak. Not supposed to be hardy in this area but the I had did really well. The leaves in the summer are a leathery blue-green. they hold on to their leaves longer in the fall and they turn a nice yellow. I really like this tree. It can grow huge given enough time.
    I planted a Sugar Maple which I got on sale in October one fall. To my surprise this tree has done extremely well. It must be a new strain because as far as I knew that did not do well around here before. They grow quickly and have a nice fall colour.
    The Norwood Maple is a hybred that does well around here, has a nice fall colour and does not grow so large.
    There is a maple that is relatively new to this market and did really well on my lot. It is called the Three Flowered Maple. It seems to be very hardy, has a compound life like the Manitoba maple but more delecate. It has a very nice orangey red fall colour and exfoliating bark like a birch. A native of norther China I was disappointed something like this was not planted in the new Chinese garden in Louise McKinney(sic) park. In my opinion this was a lost opportunity all around. The city has done a very conservative landscaping job failing to capture the essence of the park. Amur maples could have been planted there, again native Chinese tress with spectacular colours in the fall.
    Another tree that would hae been suitable for that park is the Amur Cork tree. It looks a bit like an ash tree in some respects, the leaves are similar and the bark looks the same. However the bark is corky to the touch and if left to it's own devices the tree will spread as wide as it is tall. The branches get massive, almost as big as the trunk. There are a number of them growing on the U of A campus. Unfortunately they have prunned them to grow up for logistical reasons. These trees are also drought tolerent.
    I could go on but the three pints of Guinness I had for supper are starting to catch up to me, hence the poor spelling.
    I certainly would be willing to voluteer my services to tree planting if we could come up with someone who is a good organizer. I am probably the best hole bigger in the world. I have lots of experienceI will share some of my other experiences at a later date.

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    How about a tax refund for planting a tree? I agree 100% with everyone that each person in this city should plant a tree. That would equal over 1 million new trees in the greater edmonton area.

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    We have an East German Oak in our backyard that will move with us if we are to ever leave this home.

    It was started from an acorn and brought back by my German next door neighbour (since deceased) the year the wall came down (1989) when she visited East Germany for the first time since WWII.

    Don't know if it is the best for this growing climate but it has weathered drought, extreme cold and over the years my menagerie of dogs (and all the kids who love to play with the puppies) and is thriving. (Not overly tall but very sturdy and the impression of stately can be seen.)

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    I would love to see a picture of it. Could you take one and show it on the new thread that I started in images of Edmonton?

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    I will take a picture on the weekend.

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    Hey guys, I'm not sure about this, but does anyone know why Edmonton does not have many oak or maple trees within the city limits? Is it because of our climate or the soil? Those hardwood trees look beautiful during the fall (like the 97 street north of 137 avenue). I used to live in Southern Ontario, and they have maples and oaks everywhere. The colours are great during the fall.

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    No idea - apparently there's huge old silver maples near the museum & high street (planted in the early 1900s) and Burr oak grows very well here.

    The City planted a small Burr Oak in our local park but someone drove over it.

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    A friend who's now living in Manhatten had a large oak in his yard
    in the Westmount area.
    Fly Edmonton first. Support EIA

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    Oaks aren't native to our part of the world, but have been grown successfully once transplanted.
    Tired of being taken advantage of .

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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardS
    Oaks aren't native to our part of the world, but have been grown successfully once transplanted.
    There are a number of healthy oaks on Saskatchewan Drive in Belgravia (off-leash area south of 74th Avenue). They look lovely. I think the biggest difference between here and, say, southern Ontario, is that our shorter growing season means they'll never be as large. But they can grow successfully here.
    Almost always open to debate...

  41. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by thrisiakaye
    nice pictures.. Trees are always important, they 're big help to the society.
    Yes, they are. Thank you for the comments.

    Welcome to C2E!

  42. #42

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    Edmonton was deemed the Forest Capital of Canada in 1994 or 95. Seems we've lost interest in that orientation.

    In my own yard I have Burr Oak, White Oak, Prairie Silk Honey Locust (similar to the locust street trees you see in Kelowna), Ohio Buckeye, Horse Chestnut, Russian Olive, White pine, Ponderosa Pine, Bristlecone Pine, and many others. I even had a healthy Ginko from Holes' Nursery until I transplanted it. Ironically, my Manchurian Ash - commonly planted in Edmonton - is fairing the worst of them all. The Burr Oak is young but already two stories tall. The Evan's Cherries are doing well too.

    The point is that Edmonton could add a LOT more colour and interest along its roads, parks and freeways. A few years ago Winnipeg undertook to plant a huge number of evergreens to add colour to its winters to make it look a lot less dead in the winter. Distraction works magic. :-)

    Anyway, I'd rather see us spend more money on tangible things like that than the usual evaporative PR program to change attitudes without really changing anything.

    I'd suggest the City plant Russian Olive sporatically along the freeways as a simple and dirt cheap trick to dress up the city. They keep their thin silver leaves until spring, don't require cleanup and are rather cool looking in the harsh winter months.

    Horse Chestnuts with their huge leaves and neat flowers could be planted in numerous visible places. Some are already in our golf courses.

    And then there's plants like rubarb - it would make a great groundcover and reduce long term mowing costs in some locations. I used rubarb to choke out 30'x8' of thistle behind my garage -- it quickly grew to have leaves 3-4' in diameter! On that note, we could plant all kinds of plants and shrubs in Edmonton providing berries for people to get out and pick in the fall and image enhancing flowers in the spring.

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    ^ I applaud everything you say. Thank you!

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    Quote Originally Posted by grish
    a while ago someone in Great Ideas forum suggested a Cherry Blossom festival in edmonton. one of the requirements, of course, was to have many cherry trees. Come spring, these little guys look very pretty. So, perhaps, planting lots of cherry trees to line major roads

    as well, any trees that go green early intermittently with trees that shed their foliage late to give us a more green feel in spring and in fall.

    Here's a great article:

    Alberta's little cherry miracle
    Mairi MacLean, The Edmonton Journal

    http://www.canada.com/edmontonjourna...eeda44&k=21361

    " "People called back with astounding results," says Evans. "It was an unusual and unusually vigorous growing tree." ...Still, when he first contacted tree nurseries, they weren't interested in the Evans cherry. "They said, 'You can't grow cherries on the Prairies,' and I said, 'Well these cherries have been growing for 50 years and they must be hardy!' The skepticism was incredible," says Evans, an energetic man who's not afraid to speak his mind. "Here was something staring people in the face but nobody could see it. "

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evans_Cherry

    http://www.ibiblio.org/ecolandtech/N.../msg03710.html

    "Evans cherry
    A Mrs Borward from the Henwood area near Edmonton, Alberta has been growing the Evans since about 1923. She is in her 80's now and says that she got the seeds from her neighbors who got these from the "English" which according to Dr Evans actually meant "Americans"...Some outstanding points of the Evans are: The highest yields in MI are about 50 pounds per tree. The Evans produces around 150 pounds per tree!"

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    Just picked three ice cream buckets of these in about 15 min. at a neighbors house yesterday. The tree was about 5 feet tall and 10 feet in circumference
    Already on their way to becoming jelly!
    http://www.dnagardens.com/sourcherries0229.htm
    http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...312721.html?14
    http://www.atcoblueflamekitchen.com/...erry_Jelly.pdf

  46. #46

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    KC and Glenco, is there anyway I could see some of the trees that you're talking about that you've planted when the summer comes?? I am very interested in them. What kind of action can us as a people take to make this stuff happen? Everyone has talked about it but nothing is being done now?

  47. #47

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    Actually the UofA used to offer a walking tour of their grounds showing off all the unusual specimens that can grow here. And the Devonian Gardens has a huge variety of trees and shrubs. I also know of a large old oak in that older neighbourhood across from the Old Pioneers Cabin.

    Some trivia - the CNR and/or the CPR had several experimental plantations along their rail lines and one was in Strathmore? by Calgary. 10-15 yrs ago the abaondoned land was slated for development and in a radio interview at the time I heard that they were surprised to find 80 or so year old trees and plants still growing there - some of which apparently had been written off as not hardy for the prairies!

    As for my yard, I have Burr Oak, Pin Oak, Silver Maple, Ohio Bucks, Horse Chesnut, White Pines, Scots Pines, Austrian Pine, Ponderosa Pine, Evans Cherries...

    (Note: I started a bare bones page on Wikipedai for Evans Cherry in case anyone wants to add to it - it really is an Edmonton success story. I'd love to see the Cherries planted along our freeways.)

    Ornamentals on the Prairies is a great reference - I have it too. And "Alberta trees of renown" is a really neat book:

    582.1609 ALB 1984
    Alberta trees of renown : an honour roll of Alberta trees 1st ed.
    Alberta Forestry Association.

    1 copy available at Stanley A. Milner Library.


    Lastly - I believe Warren Buffett is quoted as saying something to this effect:

    'The oak you stand under today is the result of the someone's foresight to plant an acorn long ago' The actual quote is much better if anyone knows it.

    It's quite in keeping with the purpose of C2E itself.

  48. #48
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    Default

    I would love to be a part of the tree planting. I need to get outside and I miss landscaping.

    The Evan's cherry sounds like it would be a good one for some areas. Especially if we can get some other fruit and berry trees/shrubs in to.

    How about saskatoons? or choke cherrys? That might encourage people to get out and help if they are able to get some reward for doing it.

  49. #49
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    I would also gladly support some sort of tree planting initiative and even donate some cash

    BUT... i would love to have like a plaque or something with my name on it in front of the tree so all can know the awesomeness of Richard W. lol no it would just be nice to go back in like 20 years and see how the tree has grown. something to impress the family with really.

  50. #50

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by onishenko View Post
    Perhaps also stricter guidlines in new suburbs? At least one tree in the front yard, and the developer needs to add trees along every street front. (Not just the 'entrance Blvd.' to these communities)
    Go look at Rutherford, off of Ellerslie road W. of gateway blvd. They put in street trees. Lot of mountain ash. Overall I'm not impressed yet. In general I would like to see at least alternating species as street trees. Makes it harder for the bugs to find the next tree when they've finished the first one. It also means that when the great plague kills off all the X trees the street isn't naked. A neighborhood I am impressed with is Laurier Drive. I see a lot of variety over the fence in people's back yards.

  51. #51

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    Mountain ash are nice - adds some colour in the winter. More russian olive and laurel leaf willow would also be nice since they retain their leaves much longer than average.

    Insect plague risk or not, I'd like to see many more pines and spruce to green up our winters and make it seem much less desolate here.
    Go to Jasper and Banff are in the winter and note how nice and green and 'warm' those places seem and feel during the winters. And I wouldn't mind seeing fewer green ash - since they lose their leaves way too soon. We need to extend our 'sense' of summer as far as possible.

  52. #52

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    I know no one has written on this thread for awhile now and I hope people find this message. I've been keeping in close contact with the city's forestry department and know of all the new trees they've been planting. Autumn blaze maples, norway maples, armstrong maples, honeylocusts, hackberries, buckeyes, spring snow crabapples.....that's a short list. They have all done very well with practically 100% survival to this point. This city will probably one day have a variety that we hope to see, I just hope its sooner than later. Check out my website of unique edmonton trees to see the variety that can actually grow in this climate.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  53. #53
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    Thanks for the news, and the great photos!
    aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

  54. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by E-town nate View Post
    I know no one has written on this thread for awhile now and I hope people find this message. I've been keeping in close contact with the city's forestry department and know of all the new trees they've been planting. Autumn blaze maples, norway maples, armstrong maples, honeylocusts, hackberries, buckeyes, spring snow crabapples.....that's a short list. They have all done very well with practically 100% survival to this point. This city will probably one day have a variety that we hope to see, I just hope its sooner than later. Check out my website of unique edmonton trees to see the variety that can actually grow in this climate.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
    Nice pics. You should get a close up shot of the leaves and bark for us novices to learn from.
    Do you have nay experience with transplanting Thuya ( smargard) Emarald cedars here?
    I some some wrapped and some not in the first few years . Seems like some don't take at all.
    Others have been here for 30 +years. What's the secret?
    "Most people do not listen with the intent to understand;they listen with the intent to reply.

  55. #55

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    I'd like to see more of an effort to re tree the Whitemud freeway as opposed to those high maintainance patches of yellow and brown grass they can't seem to keep growing or cut.
    They ripped the crap out of the natural vegetation to rebuild the roads and there seems nothing in the works to replace the trees.
    I could picture some flaming Maples and a decent mix of conifers spotted here and there as the topography allows.
    Last edited by Old Dawg; 23-08-2010 at 06:54 PM.
    "Most people do not listen with the intent to understand;they listen with the intent to reply.

  56. #56

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    Has anyone on here ever tried an American Sycamore tree?? I just bought a london plane tree (which is a cross between an american and oriental sycamore) this year but apparently its not as hardy as the American Sycamore. Bismarck, North Dakota has a massive one over 50 feet tall and they get COOOLDD (below -40 many years). Either way, this tree is used to line the freeways in California. They look like massive poplars with really cool peeling bark and maple shaped leaves. How about a trial of these trees please?? I've never seen one in a nursery and no one has ever been able to get me one via special order. If I had the money to plant 100 of these to test them out, I would.

    As for flaming maples, plant autumn blaze maples down the freeway. They are extremely drought tolerant and have being proving themselves hardy to our climate. Their autumn color is unmatched.

  57. #57

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    I would also assume the temperature is probably a little bit warmer down the side of freeways with all of the heat from the vehicles going by and protection from wind with large walls on either side. This would probably increase the different selection available. Possibly zone 4a trees???

  58. #58

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    ^ parks and recreation should have some numbers for us about that. ??
    It seems plausable at least in some areas. It would be splendid if it is a fact.
    "Most people do not listen with the intent to understand;they listen with the intent to reply.

  59. #59

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    There is a list of all the types of trees they've tried. This tree is not one of them. Here is the link to see the tree in north dakota. Its on page 48 of the pdf.

    http://www.ndsu.edu/fileadmin/ndfs/d...egister_09.pdf

    You have no clue how hard it is to get any statistics from parks and rec. I had to bug them for a very long time.

  60. #60

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    I planted a Quaiking Aspen a couple of years ago.
    It has grown into a very nice tree.
    You do not see many in parks or on city property.
    They seem to be pretty hardy.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  61. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    And I wouldn't mind seeing fewer green ash - since they lose their leaves way too soon. We need to extend our 'sense' of summer as far as possible.
    I agree, Green Ash don't leaf till June and Sept 1st the leaves drop, 9 months with no leaves. Elms are my favourite local tree, winter hearty, big and the spreading branches make it one of our few shade trees. I had one in the back yard of my old house in Beverly, three trunks together, palm shaped, 60+ feet high, 50+ foot spread, nearly 10 feet in circumference.

    We are lucky not to have Dutch Elm yet but other varieties are resistant to it. A few years back, the City decided not to plant Elms anymore because their roots can lift sidewalks and damage roads. Instead they would plant Green Ash. Even some of the Councillors were upset. I looked at a lot of old elms like those on Whyte Ave. The curbs only lifted in maybe one in 25 trees, no big deal. They just have to plant them a little further from the curb or use them in parks and larger areas. Some died because of the drought and the city made almost no effort to water them in the past 10 years. All they had to do is drive by with a water truck and spray the grass as they slowly drove by at night and do it 2 or 3 moderate waterings a night once a month from late April to October. Not only do you water them to spur growth, it makes them more resistant to pests and washes away the accumulations of salt that build up in the soil along roads.


    My pet peeve is that the city cut down the beautiful trees on a small park on the corner of 114th street and 87th ave in 2004, by the LRT tunnel at the Jubilee. They did not need the room for construction and they built a new butt ugly park after they cut down the trees so I cannot figure out why they did it in the first place. The grass was lush, the trees beautiful, now it is a wide sidewalk and a patch of grass.









    Here is what it looks like today

    http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&sourc...42.36,,0,12.83


    Edmonton's American Elms are admired as some of the best surviving examples in North America.



    From http://princetonamericanelm.blogspot.com/

    Ash and elm pests
    http://www.treecanada.ca/cufc6/proce...s/Saunders.pdf


    Parallel thread Zero diversity in Tree planting
    http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/forum...ead.php?t=3974
    Last edited by Edmonton PRT; 24-08-2010 at 12:52 AM.
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  62. #62

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    Does anyone know why this huge popular was deliberately girdled to kill it, on the corner of 73 ave and 81st street?



    When they built the new home they removed all the trees but left two on the city property. Did they kill it so that the City will be responsible to remove it?

    When I lived in Ontario a guy bought a home that had a 150 year old Maple on the corner of the lot. He applied to the city to allow him to remove it but they would not let him as it was a heritage tree and in prime condition. He appealed their decision but failed. He then girdled it in the middle of the night and when it died, the City had to remove it at taxpayer's expense.
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  63. #63

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
    Does anyone know why this huge popular was deliberately girdled to kill it, on the corner of 73 ave and 81st street?



    When they built the new home they removed all the trees but left two on the city property. Did they kill it so that the City will be responsible to remove it?

    When I lived in Ontario a guy bought a home that had a 150 year old Maple on the corner of the lot. He applied to the city to allow him to remove it but they would not let him as it was a heritage tree and in prime condition. He appealed their decision but failed. He then girdled it in the middle of the night and when it died, the City had to remove it at taxpayer's expense.
    Most likely the roots of that poplar were interfering with the utilities adjacent.
    I can see the sidewalk punched up in you picture as an example.
    If it gets in the drain system it costs major bucks to replace the lines.

    I had to cut down one like that last year as it was becoming unmanageable.
    All my neighbors loved the tree for its immense size but no one liked the fluff and leaves it dumped by the car load.
    I replaced it with four emerald cedars but I still miss the darn thing.
    FWIW the city should really be doing more with trees in the city while there is still time to establish a decent stock with variations.
    It's what makes a city breathe.
    "Most people do not listen with the intent to understand;they listen with the intent to reply.

  64. #64

    Default trees in subdivisions

    I am wondering why I live in the ugliest subdivision in Edmonton where no city trees were planted and the residents are too cheap to purchase one for their yard. My sub division is Mayliewan and neighborhood is All Pine Estates. The bus route got trees and a few got lucky on Ozerna Road but I assume the developer in this area was not into saving the city with the use of trees but it sure would be nice to have some planted in front of each house. I have planted lots in my yard but I am a loner here and feel very naked. Trees create such beauty and some beautiful flowering tree neighborhoods like the streets in Saskatoon would be a wonder along side the streets filled with the colorful maples. How do we go about getting some trees planted in this eyesight of a neighborhood which thrives on concrete and weedy rocks as decor is my question for the day?

  65. #65

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    Yes. The white mud should be covered in trees. Same with Henday. The city should plant Swedish aspens and elm trees and pine all over te place. The white mud and henday should look like Forrest's

  66. #66

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    I'm reviving this old thread.


    Here's my idea, with Canada's sesquicentennial coming up in 2 years, to commemorate it, plant a million trees in under-utilized parks and parts of town in need of colour and canopy.

  67. #67

  68. #68
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    You should submit tactical tree planting project to make something Edmonton. Gather up some seed funding (haha - get it) to plant saplings all over the place. I support this idea.

  69. #69
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    I have some giant sequoia seeds I wonder if they'd grow here, or would it be too cold. I know its too cold for the coastal sequoia.

    I might just start them in pots and then guerrilla plant them in some of the wetter spots in BC.

  70. #70

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    I believe Edmonton is a Zone 2/3 region. For reference, here's a couple links to catalogues of Zone 1, 2 & 3 trees:
    http://www.discoverytrees.ca/catalogct.htm
    http://www.discoverytrees.ca/catalogdt.htm
    Hug a tree today!

  71. #71
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    I am always wondering what must be the problem with any new trees planted Downtown compared to the trees planted in other areas of the city. The ones Downtown if lucky will take root and grow. Is it inadequate soil, Vandalism (which I have seen), Or is it the contractors paid to remove the snow from the sidewalks in the winter; they use allot of salt . The new trees planted I have observed the City watering very diligently for the first season and then nothing for the next would increasing this PM help?

  72. #72

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    ^^ Edmonton is rated as zone 3 in respects to plant hardiness. Though, due to the heat island effect and also possibly global warming, many zone 4 and even zone 5 plants and trees are capable of growing here.

  73. #73

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    The U of A campus has a lot of big old trees that people don't think will grow here. And Devonian Gardens and George Pegg's gardens north of Lac St. Anne have examples outside of any heat island.

    Also, when the old abandoned Canadian Pacific Railway "Experimental Farm" in Strathmore was cleared for development (in the 1990s, I believe), they discovered a number of big old trees growing there that they thought weren't hardy but had survived a hundred years.


    see page 45 for some names...
    http://www.jeffriesnurseries.com/knowles.pdf



    Good discussion...

    Pushing the limits -- trees and shrubs

    http://forums.gardenweb.com/discussi...ees-and-shrubs
    Last edited by KC; 26-10-2015 at 12:55 PM.

  74. #74

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    The Pegg Gardens is quite interesting, there's a couple of large beautiful walnut trees with huge almost tropical looking foliage. The butternut tree was unfortunately approaching the end of its lifespan and showing dieback.

    Years ago, had come across a 25 ft katsura tree while on a yard tour in west Edmonton and have wanted one ever since!

  75. #75

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    I'd always planned to take a protected potion of my yard and crest a faux tropical look. There's a number of plants, shrubs and trees that combined would create a really; "Out of THIS world experience.

    A week ago, I had a punning guy with a lot of experience stop and do a double take of my horse chestnut tree.

    I also have healthy Ohio buckeyes, burr oak, bristlecone pine, ponderosa pine, Japanese lilacs, etc.

    Should never have moved my ginkgo - I had great hopes for it.

    Prairie Locust is also a cool looking tree.

    And we're removing our Russian olive which is a fantastic deciduous tree. Super hardy, keeps its leaves into the winter and so adds some colour and 'life', and you never have to rake them up.

  76. #76
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    I tore out my yard...old turf only. I retained all previous plantings. The Elms, European Lilac, Mayday and Maples. I transplaned the Mayday and Elms. I added 15 Brandon Cedars and an ornamental Crab. Contrary to belief, the Manitoba Maple is a great tree that provides a privacy barrier between my neighbor and I. They can be pruned to any height and narrowed the same way. The Elm was a vollunteer I simply planted on the boulevard along with the Crab and 2 Vertical Aspen. A CottonEaster hedge connects all the Cedars and will grow into a hedge in 2 or 3 seasons of growth. I added a small patio made from 100 year old brick surrounded by a rose garden.My real estate consultant told me that every large,mature tree can be worth up to $5000. And no less than $2000 There is real equity in a yard if done correctly. Mine was appraised at a cool $15000+. And to think, the cost of doing the work myself was a paltry $1700 for soil,sod,brick and plants. An easy way to add equity to a property.
    Make the RIGHT choice before you take your last breath......

  77. #77

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cnr67 View Post
    I tore out my yard...old turf only. I retained all previous plantings. The Elms, European Lilac, Mayday and Maples. I transplaned the Mayday and Elms. I added 15 Brandon Cedars and an ornamental Crab. Contrary to belief, the Manitoba Maple is a great tree that provides a privacy barrier between my neighbor and I. They can be pruned to any height and narrowed the same way. The Elm was a vollunteer I simply planted on the boulevard along with the Crab and 2 Vertical Aspen. A CottonEaster hedge connects all the Cedars and will grow into a hedge in 2 or 3 seasons of growth. I added a small patio made from 100 year old brick surrounded by a rose garden.My real estate consultant told me that every large,mature tree can be worth up to $5000. And no less than $2000 There is real equity in a yard if done correctly. Mine was appraised at a cool $15000+. And to think, the cost of doing the work myself was a paltry $1700 for soil,sod,brick and plants. An easy way to add equity to a property.
    Years ago Monrovia printed a similar finding on the dramatic value boost for a well landscaped home. I always thought it was a no brainer. Houses age and show their age. Landscaping serves to downplay any eyesore effect, if not hide it altogether, and even boosting the intrinsic value of the whole property.

    It's mind boggling that a lot of older neighbourhoods, often now seen as possessing entry level homes, have slowly removed all vegetation until all you see is delapidated or rather mediocre aging, un-restored homes. You'd think they'd being doing all they could to boost the value, but I assume it's the aging owners letting things fall into disrepair or absentee owners/renters not giving a __t.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cnr67 View Post
    I tore out my yard...old turf only. I retained all previous plantings. The Elms, European Lilac, Mayday and Maples. I transplaned the Mayday and Elms. I added 15 Brandon Cedars and an ornamental Crab. Contrary to belief, the Manitoba Maple is a great tree that provides a privacy barrier between my neighbor and I. They can be pruned to any height and narrowed the same way. The Elm was a vollunteer I simply planted on the boulevard along with the Crab and 2 Vertical Aspen. A CottonEaster hedge connects all the Cedars and will grow into a hedge in 2 or 3 seasons of growth. I added a small patio made from 100 year old brick surrounded by a rose garden.My real estate consultant told me that every large,mature tree can be worth up to $5000. And no less than $2000 There is real equity in a yard if done correctly. Mine was appraised at a cool $15000+. And to think, the cost of doing the work myself was a paltry $1700 for soil,sod,brick and plants. An easy way to add equity to a property.
    Years ago Monrovia printed a similar finding on the dramatic value boost for a well landscaped home. I always thought it was a no brainer. Houses age and show their age. Landscaping serves to downplay any eyesore effect, if not hide it altogether, and even boosting the intrinsic value of the whole property.

    It's mind boggling that a lot of older neighbourhoods, often now seen as entry level homes, have slowly removed all vegetation until all you see is delapidated or rather mediocre aging, un-restored homes. You'd think they'd being doing all they could to boost the value, but I assume it's the aging owners letting things fall into disrepair.
    That can happen as was my home when I bought it. The yard I spoke of actually took 5 years to complete up to this point. I've done far more than I have listed. I guess it boils down to more than the value of money. Rather the value of lush green space right outside ones home.
    Make the RIGHT choice before you take your last breath......

  79. #79

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by grish
    a while ago someone in Great Ideas forum suggested a Cherry Blossom festival in edmonton. one of the requirements, of course, was to have many cherry trees. Come spring, these little guys look very pretty. So, perhaps, planting lots of cherry trees to line major roads

    as well, any trees that go green early intermittently with trees that shed their foliage late to give us a more green feel in spring and in fall.

    Here's a great article:

    Alberta's little cherry miracle
    Mairi MacLean, The Edmonton Journal

    http://www.canada.com/edmontonjourna...eeda44&k=21361

    " "People called back with astounding results," says Evans. "It was an unusual and unusually vigorous growing tree." ...Still, when he first contacted tree nurseries, they weren't interested in the Evans cherry. "They said, 'You can't grow cherries on the Prairies,' and I said, 'Well these cherries have been growing for 50 years and they must be hardy!' The skepticism was incredible," says Evans, an energetic man who's not afraid to speak his mind. "Here was something staring people in the face but nobody could see it. "

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evans_Cherry

    http://www.ibiblio.org/ecolandtech/N.../msg03710.html

    "Evans cherry
    A Mrs Borward from the Henwood area near Edmonton, Alberta has been growing the Evans since about 1923. She is in her 80's now and says that she got the seeds from her neighbors who got these from the "English" which according to Dr Evans actually meant "Americans"...Some outstanding points of the Evans are: The highest yields in MI are about 50 pounds per tree. The Evans produces around 150 pounds per tree!"



    “The secret fruit that grows in -40”



    BBC - Travel - The secret cherry taking over Canada

    Able to survive temperatures as low as -40C, Saskatchewan’s prairie cherries are tarter than traditional sweet cherries and can be eaten straight from the tree.

    By Ryan MacDonald
    22 March 2018


    ....
    Today, dwarf sour cherries may be grown in abundance by a wave of new commercial farmers, but it’s the storied history of how they came to be that has become a local legend.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, professors and plant technicians at the university began growing dwarf-sized sour cherry plants from seedlings they’d collected from the Siberian Botanical Garden in Russia. When even these plants struggled to survive an entire Saskatchewan winter, the programme, led at the time by Dr Stewart Nelson, didn’t bother cross-breeding them with other hardy varieties, assuming they would never survive the extreme cold weather found in this part of the world.

    “Those cherries were crap except one tree,” said Rick Sawatzky, research technician for the university for the past 46 years, who worked with the early generations of these plants. “I made no headway.”

    But that was all about to change. Unbeknown to most of the growers and farmers in the area, a local federal government employee named Dr Les Kerr had been working in private since the 1940s to improve the quality of sour cherries. As a lone grower, he was doing work no-one else thought could be done.

    ...”


    http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/2018...ng-over-canada
    Bolding mine





    .
    Last edited by KC; 21-03-2018 at 08:23 PM.

  80. #80

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    “those who lived in the most polluted urban areas, having trees in the neighbourhood was strongly linked with fewer emergency hospital admissions”

    Trees in urban areas may help reduce risk of asthma attacks | CTV News


    “For the research, Dr. Alcock looked at more than 650,000 serious asthma attacks over a 15-year period, comparing emergency hospitalizations across 26,455 urban neighbourhoods in England.

    He found that for those who lived in the most polluted urban areas, having trees in the neighbourhood was strongly linked with fewer emergency hospital admissions for asthma cases.”

    https://www.ctvnews.ca/mobile/health...acks-1.3685671

  81. #81

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    The arrival of the emerald ash borer could wipe out 350,000 trees in Winnipeg
    By: Ryan Thorpe
    12/7/2017

    “The arrival of the beetle has the potential to wipe out the entirety of Winnipeg’s ash tree canopy, at a time when the city is struggling to keep up with the spread of Dutch elm disease.

    “We anticipate there will be a significant impact on our urban canopy as a result of this pest... It is a serious problem,” Barwinsky said at a press conference Thursday afternoon.
    ...”


    https://www.winnipegfreepress.com/lo...462654053.html



    Calgary seeks power to remove private trees in beetle battle
    May 23, 2018
    Calgary Herald

    http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-...le-infestation
    Last edited by KC; 04-06-2018 at 08:44 PM.

  82. #82

    Default

    Halifax to test resilience of palm trees in ‘pretty harsh’ winter climate | Calgary Herald

    https://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pm...winter-climate



    Even if they die, it’s going to be hilarious forever more seeing photos of Halifax’s palms on the Internet

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