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Thread: Tamarack Subdivision - Avoid!

  1. #1

    Default Tamarack Subdivision - Avoid!

    Tamarack is a new subdivision that is attracting lots of interest but the developer (Dundee) and various builders are not being entirely fair with their customers. As someone who has been burned by moving into this subdivision I think more people should know about what's happening.

    Basically when the subdivision was open for sale there was no method to actually enter the construction site. None of the developer maps showed that there was a train line in the area! A noisy train that runs very frequently, especially at night.

    Those of us who initially purchased lots based on the sitemaps and the assurances of the sales agents were pretty surprised when once the subdivision opened we found out how close the train was to our homes (it basically runs through some people's backyard!).

    So we confronted the builder (Summerhill Homes) but their sales agent told us the line would be discontinued. By the time we found out the truth from CN Rail that the line would not be discontinued, Summerhill had our sizable deposit already.

    I've created a website to organize information about what has been happening here: http://tamarack.brentknowles.com/

    And there's a petition to protest this here: http://www.petitiononline.com/CNRail/petition.html

    Just thought people should know. If anyone has any suggestions please let me know. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    sorry man.....if you didn't know you were living close to a railline, it's your own damn fault. Geez, people just can't take any responsibility for themselves nowadays. The line has been there for 80+ years, did you not do ANY research whatsoever, before making such a big investment?

  3. #3

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    There's doing your due diligence, but then there's being lied to.

    If the developer told them that the line was to be discontinued when in fact it wasn't, that's fraud.

  4. #4

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    why on earth would you ask the developers sales person if the CN Rail line is going to be discontinued. Sure they lied to you, but did you at least get something in writing from them or see something from CN that said they would actually be abandoning the line they were using?

  5. #5

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    I took a look at your website and I'm not entirely sure what it is you're looking for. Compensation? Deposit refund so you can purchase elsewhere? Also, I live on the far northeast side of the city and even I knew there was a rail line next to the marsh. You can't miss it when driving on the Whitemud. The sales agent definitely erred when suggesting the rail line would be discontinued, but otherwise I think it's buyer beware. Trains run through many parts of the city including my place and I barely notice it. Lastly, it's mentioned often that the development is just a field... all developments are just a field until they are complete.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  6. #6

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    I totally agree... at the end of the day we were stupid. We have learned a lot though, as you can tell by reading the links I supplied.

    We did some research but because we didn't know how CLOSE we were to the line, we had no idea of the effect... the house shakes multiple times a day. I've never lived close to a train line before so I had no idea what would happen.

    It also took months for CN Rail to get back to us on whether they were discontinuing the line. When you decide to build a house you have to put a down payment on the house immediately. Once you do that you lose the money if you back out.

    We built the house during the housing boom and there was a time pressure (i.e., other people waiting in line to claim our lot) if we did not make the purchase. We had already lost other lots in other subdivisions by taking too long.

    By the time we found out the line would not be discontinued we had already paid the money, plus lined up selling our existing house, et cetera.

    At the end of the day, regardless of people being stupid though, the city should not have allowed another subdivision to be built so close to the train line, Dundee shouldn't be withholding train information, and the builders in the subdivision shouldn't have told people that the train was being discontinued.

    At the end of the day all I can do is convince other people not to move into this subdivision. It is noisy, the shaking damages the houses, and it will disrupt your life. Don't move into Tamarack.

  7. #7

    Default Train Noise

    The train noise we have gotten used to. It is the shaking of the house that we can't sleep through.

  8. #8

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    Normally trains don't make the ground shake but that whole area is marshland, pretty soft stuff. I didn't check the petition but have you and your neighbors asked the rail company if they'd consider looking into that?
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  9. #9
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    when we lived in ottawa, my parents built a house in an in fill development that backed right on to the CN tracks. the back of our yard was a fence, and then the tracks.

    the house definitely shook. not a significant amount, but enough to notice it if you were awake. the sound wasn't bad. my parents kept us entertained by getting us to count the number of grain cars, heading off to this mythical place called Alberta.

    the plus side was that our lot was massive. probably 200' from the back of the house to the fence.

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    I work in a building that's directly adjacent to a rail line, and i can attest to the shaking. we always know when a loaded train is rolling by because the entire 2 story office building starts shaking. I've even had clients asking if there's an earthquake or something. It's pretty noticeable.

    Sorry to hear about the location of your house, but i have to side with the buyer beware people on this one. A 2 minute google maps search shows the proximity to the rail line...
    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...06866&t=h&z=18

  11. #11

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    In regards to the google search -- there were no houses there when we made the decision. Doing this search in 2007 would have just shown an empty field and a line. No houses for comparision.

    We did drive out onto the field as far as we could without getting stuck, trying to guess where the house would be, but without streets, it was pretty hard to figure out how close we would eventually be.

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    That rail line has existed for nearly a century, connecting to Calgary through Camrose and Three Hills. As the port at Prince Rupert expands, there will be even more cargo coming through bound for southern Alberta.

    As a general comment, the city shouldn't allow developments such as Tamarack, not because of the proximity to train tracks, but rather because they are devastating for the environment.

    Schools in communities such as High Park, Woodcroft, Newton and Ritchie have been closed over the last three years so new ones in Tamarack and other sprawl neighbourhoods can be built. Perhaps people who've moved into these areas can explain why their children deserve to walk to new school, on new sidewalks, while families in mature parts of the city have been forced onto buses and are dealing with crumbling infrastructure.

    Residents in Tamarack complaining about train vibrations, like the group in Cameron Heights upset about freeway noise, are not deserving of much sympathy, in my view.

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    caveat emptor
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  14. #14

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    I really have to wonder why the city would allow such a row of houses to be built along a rail track? On the site map did it show and clearly mark the rail line? Was the map accurate showing where your house would be? I don't know if all that can help you.

    My work building is 2 blocks away (approx. 200m) from the train that runs through Town and we can feel the building shake. Darn Marsh land!

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by lat View Post
    There's doing your due diligence, but then there's being lied to.

    If the developer told them that the line was to be discontinued when in fact it wasn't, that's fraud.
    Now you just have to prove it.

  16. #16

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    ^yep

  17. #17

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    "Tamarack" ...
    ...
    ...

    "Train track"

    not quite the same letters - but pretty close. Perhaps there was a subliminal warning in there?

  18. #18

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    Brent, I can sympathize with you a little bit. First off when we bought our lot there were also no roads leading to it yet and when the ground was muddy we could not get there.

    Also our sales person lied to us many times. She ended up getting fired over her incompetence but in the meantime we were stuck having believed the lies she told us. I think sometimes they just tell you what they think you want to hear because they don't really know the answer and they want to appear knowledgeable.

    If we ever go through this process again I will have a note pad with me every time we meet with the sales person and write down everything with dates and have her sign. It's sad that that would be necessary because you always want to believe that people are honest.

    I don't think you were stupid for buying the lot, or for believing the sales people. It's easy to look back and see where you went wrong but when you're in a situation like that you have to make a decision and sometimes it turns out to be wrong. That's just life, but it's not stupid.

    On the bright side, I used to live right next door to a rail line (on the devon highway north of acheson) and honestly after a while we didn't even hear the train anymore. You just get so used to it that it's not even an issue. At least that's how it was for us. The line was probably 25 to 30 metres from our backdoor but we were also right by the crossing which meant the trains had to honk their loud horns everytime they came near. Like I said it didn't bother us at all. Hopefully it won't bother you either.

  19. #19

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    I am surprised this link still exisits...

    This post is to all doing their homework, as my husband and I did. You most likely stumbled on this link, just as we had.

    We made an educated decision to live in Tamarack. We googled, binged, yahooed...with searched numerous search engines from comments on the neighbourhood. We also canvased the neighbourhood where we were looking at purchasing, we asked about the builder, the neighbourhood...and obviously, the train.

    Fact is folks, when you drive to the neighbourhood coming from the anthony henday, you drive over top of the train tracks. You can see it exists from 17st.

    Reality is, any new neighbourhood you look at now (other than greisbach) has train tracks, power lines, or the anthony henday OR you are ridiculously far from the city. There is going to be something around the neighbourhood.

    My family and I consider ourselves extremely lucky to live in Tamarack. Although we loath the idea of more development in the area, we are excited to live here for years to come! (I promise you, this is such a tranquil area to live in when the contruction goes home! The openness, the wildlife, everything - it is amazing!)

    Tamarack IS an amazing place to live. The city is at your fingertips! WEM is only 15 minutes away (less once the whitemud construction is done!) 20 minutes will get you anywhere you want to go in the city! The residents are beyond friendly, the school is close, shopping is close... It is just an amazing place to live.

    The trains...the trains are the least of my worries living here. You here it every now and then, but just as much as you would anywhere else! The worst part of Tamarack is that it has to keep growing...and I know it will...it is just to great of a place to live!

    If you take anything from this thread, let it be to do your research. Do as we did, search the crap out of the neighbourhood you plan to move in, canvas the neighbourhood, not just the block you would like to live on, but the neighbourhood. Hang out there for a day, have a picnic, exist as a resident there...and then make your decision. If you don't do your research, then you don't have the right to complain afterwards...especially over something like a train track.

    Good luck...

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    A 2 minute google maps search shows the proximity to the rail line...
    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...06866&t=h&z=18
    mmmm, sprawl indeed: when I worked for CN we used to spot the odd load of pipe for unloading out there on a little spur just north of where the eastern edge of housing is now; other than Pe Ben, there was nothing out there (of course that was in the early 1990s).

  21. #21

    Default If you value your sleep avoid Tamarack

    The previous poster pumping up Tamarack is obviously a salesperson with one of the builders in the area.

    If you value your sleep, steer clear of Tamarack.

    The CN trains fly by at all hours of the night and blare their horns/whistles.

    Two or three times a night (last night at 2:00 AM, 4:30 AM, and 5:45 AM) the train will blare it's whistle excessively.

    On Monday a CN train killed a kid in Leduc. Funny, the train's horn wasn't an effective safety measure. No ****! How about driving at a speed that will allow you to stop? No, that would cut into profits.

    If you move to Tamarack you will experience corporate bullying at it's finest as CN will make your life miserable.

    If you are still considering Tamarack, spend a night here, you'll thank yourself that you did and then you'll feel sorry for all the residence who are bullied by CN.

    Corporatocracy FTW.

  22. #22
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    It's by a RAIL LINE....what were you expecting, peace and quiet. Give your head a shake.

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisD View Post
    It's by a RAIL LINE....what were you expecting, peace and quiet. Give your head a shake.
    That was informative. Are your posts always this insightful? Or are you just trolling?

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    the kid that got hit by the train was wearing headphones so you cant blame the horns. plus who the f walks along a rail track? jesus walk beside it at least.
    be offended! figure out why later...

  25. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by UpAllNight View Post
    If you value your sleep, steer clear of Tamarack.
    I think most people do, and that's why they do their research and don't move next to train tracks.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  26. #26

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    This is the 21st century, we've sent rovers to mars. But the safety measures used on trains is a whistle, the same whistle that was used 100 years ago.

    CN makes profits in excess of $500 million a quarter.

    They killed 3 people this week with their trains. Maybe they can spend some money on upgrading the technology used in the trains so that they can stop?

    Or, if it's going to save a few lives, take a few thousand out of your $500 million quarterly profits and pay for a spotter to drive ahead of the train in populated areas.

    Blowing a whistle is a joke. But hey, it sure is cost effective.

  27. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    What's a joke is the fact you bought/rent besides a train track. The track was there long before your house and the whole subdivision.
    Now you expect other people to pay for your lack of research, and your own stupidity? Why exactly did you move here? Was it the cheap housing, or was it the cheap housing?
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    Why exactly did you move here?
    You live here too? Maybe we're neighbours! Or did you mean 'Why exactly did you move THERE?'

    You got me. It was the cheap housing. =P

    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    ...bought/rent besides a train track.
    PS It's beside, not besides....and your calling me stupid....
    Last edited by UpAllNight; 14-02-2012 at 09:31 PM.

  28. #28

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    No, here, as in the place the current discussion surrounds...

    May a thousand trains pass by tonight, and may the train let its sweet sweet sounding horn blow all through the night http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evF0Yqyrp2A

    Caveat Emptor!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisD View Post
    It's by a RAIL LINE....what were you expecting, peace and quiet. Give your head a shake.
    Exactly
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  30. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    No, here, as in the place the current discussion surrounds...

    May a thousand trains pass by tonight, and may the train let its sweet sweet sounding horn blow all through the night http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evF0Yqyrp2A

    Caveat Emptor!
    The place the current discussion surrounds? Why did I move to the place the current discussion surrounds?

    You're not making any sense.

  31. #31

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    What doesn't make sense is why you would buy next to a train track and expect that you would not hear any noise from passing trains.... Then what really makes no sense is that you come to a forum looking for sympathy on your poor suburban sprawl choice...
    And it seems rather than discussing your poor choice, you'd rather just attempt to hurl insults and pick out grammar mistakes I've made typing on my iPhone.

    you're going places fast I tell you.

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    Sorry to hear about the train, but noises do occur in the city.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    What doesn't make sense is why you would buy next to a train track and expect that you would not hear any noise from passing trains.... Then what really makes no sense is that you come to a forum looking for sympathy on your poor suburban sprawl choice...
    And it seems rather than discussing your poor choice, you'd rather just attempt to hurl insults and pick out grammar mistakes I've made typing on my iPhone.

    you're going places fast I tell you.
    Dude.

    Calm down and be more construtive
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  34. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by IanO View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    What doesn't make sense is why you would buy next to a train track and expect that you would not hear any noise from passing trains.... Then what really makes no sense is that you come to a forum looking for sympathy on your poor suburban sprawl choice...
    And it seems rather than discussing your poor choice, you'd rather just attempt to hurl insults and pick out grammar mistakes I've made typing on my iPhone.

    you're going places fast I tell you.
    Dude.

    Calm down and be more construtive
    Sorry IanO, you're right. Here's something more constructive. Caveat Emptor.

  35. #35

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    You guys are missing the point of this thread and this forum.

    This information (used for research) is here to prevent others from moving to the area.

    On one hand you're saying do your research, but on the other hand you want to kill this thread to prevent people from doing research.

    I'm not sure if either of you have done any research before (maybe University?), but first hand research is often the best kind, and that's exactly what this thread is providing.

    Your trolling of this thread isn't of any value to anyone. On the other hand, the experiences posted here by the people living in this community will be valuable to someone trying to make an informed decision on whether to move to Tamarack.

    Say no to trolls.

  36. #36

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    Hopefully people will Caveat Emptor before making such a huge decision in their lives. It really seems like you failed to do so.

    This is just rich though, and really was what I was responding to.

    If you are still considering Tamarack, spend a night here, you'll thank yourself that you did and then you'll feel sorry for all the residence who are bullied by CN.
    Bullied by CN? Seriously?! Like OMGZ we bought a house by a train track and trains pass by at night and blow them horns all night longs!!! Now CN won't do anything about it!! Bullied by CN!!

    Get real.

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    Quote Originally Posted by UpAllNight View Post
    Say no to trolls.
    Well, you could be more constructive too, you know. Blaming CN for all the evils of the world does not help your credibility here (I for one was taught at an early age to stay off rail tracks). For the record, I do sympathize with your plight if you were one of those who were misled into believing that the rail line was going to be closed (as noted in early posts).
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  38. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by UpAllNight View Post
    Say no to trolls.
    Well, you could be more constructive too, you know. Blaming CN for all the evils of the world does not help your credibility here (I for one was taught at an early age to stay off rail tracks). For the record, I do sympathize with your plight if you were one of those who were misled into believing that the rail line was going to be closed (as noted in early posts).
    CN has a social responsibility (or at least they claim to be socially responsible on their web site). Also, there are rules that govern when a train should use it's horn (CORR) and there are also laws that protect citizens from noise pollution.

    http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/documents/...ror_tco093.pdf

    Part of the problem in this area is that certain conductors are insensitive to the people living in the area, and they are using the whistle excessively, when it is unnecessary and does not fall within the guidelines.

    It's kind of like having a neighbour who parties and plays loud music all night. But at least with a neighbour you can call the police and they will enforce the by laws.

    With CN, it isn't that easy.

    And yes, CN is a corporate bully. Name me one other corporation that can stop a city during rush hour traffic and make thousands of commuters wait for the corporation to do it's business?

    Or am I just stupid for taking a route home from work that passes over a train track?


    http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/documents/...ror_tco093.pdf

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    Uhm, just to point out the obvious but UpAllnight also said to stay away from Tamarack (not buy). It could be more a warning to not repeat the perceived mistake by the poster. I'd just say thanks, I won't buy there!

    Some of you guys seem way more irritable the last little while. Jeez!

    Now I will duck!
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    I think one thing that might help the Tamarack subdivision could be a hill between the CN tracks and subdivision to buffer/deflect some of the sound. This line does have a lot of train traffic, and I can't think of another neighbourhood that is that close to a direct train line.
    "Talk minus action equals zero." - Joe Keithley, D. O. A.

  41. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBear View Post
    I really have to wonder why the city would allow such a row of houses to be built along a rail track? On the site map did it show and clearly mark the rail line? Was the map accurate showing where your house would be? I don't know if all that can help you.

    My work building is 2 blocks away (approx. 200m) from the train that runs through Town and we can feel the building shake. Darn Marsh land!
    One of the few reasonable posts in the thread.

    The houses on 11th street are built way too close to the traintracks and especially given that the whole area is marshy substrata. Its amazing really that this was allowed but its the same city that allows residential development on the tops of unstable cliffs.

    The settling of these lots is going to result in a lot of problems combined with what are probably suspect foundations and poured basements.

    This is just over 100ft from the houses judging from the maps. Plus this is a freight train route and its same grade. If the subdivision was at least elevated from that or with a barrier wall it would be somewhat more acceptable.

    But allowing this development in Canada, and specifically on the prairies, where land is plentiful, is asinine.

    I wonder if anybody commenting on the thread has even worked construction. The same freight trains that are terrorizing people late at night zooming past right close by would have done irreperable damage to the foundation and poured basements of these homes. For anybody thats tried constructing a home, building, whatever, that close to traintracks you would be aware of the problems and compromising of concrete setting. Thats like having an earthquake several times a day. Concrete just doesn't ideally set under those conditions. I would suspect extensive problems to develop in those houses if they are not already evident and with any cracks, flaws, becoming worse through time due to the excessive vibration from the traintracks.

    I was once working on a 12 inch cinder block warehouse that was located 2 blocks away from freight train tracks. As fast as we'd complete a wall cracks would appear and get worse by the next morning. It was literally impossible to run a cohesive running bond with the trains rattling all day long. The mortar just wouldn't set properly. The walls were excessively compromised. Basically just durawall holding it together. The warehouse had to be torn down twice at cost plus because it was basically next to impossible to build the damn thing with the trains running by regularly.

    I would wonder if its still standing anymore.
    Last edited by Replacement; 14-02-2012 at 10:22 PM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  42. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by booster View Post
    Uhm, just to point out the obvious but UpAllnight also said to stay away from Tamarack (not buy). It could be more a warning to not repeat the perceived mistake by the poster. I'd just say thanks, I won't buy there!

    Some of you guys seem way more irritable the last little while. Jeez!

    Now I will duck!
    Yeah, I would say some horrible behavior in this thread. C'mon guys, right or wrong people here investing this amount of money on a house have already suffered dearly, now only to be ridiculed by trolling posts and people basically laughing at their plight.
    Last edited by Replacement; 14-02-2012 at 10:22 PM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  43. #43

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    Caveat Emptor indeed.

    Complaining about the train won't get you anywhere UpAllNight.
    Have you considered moving to another location?
    Have you considered soundproofing your house?
    Edmonton first, everything else second.

  44. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasH View Post
    Caveat Emptor indeed.

    Complaining about the train won't get you anywhere UpAllNight.
    Have you considered moving to another location?
    Have you considered soundproofing your house?
    I appreciate your concern but I think you are wrong. Complaining about problems is how things get improved. Laying down or walking away is not to going to solve any problems. If I move another family is going to move into this house and face the same problem.

    There are avenues for addressing this problem, and I'm also exploring those.

    PS Short of using 6 inches of solid concrete for walls, no level of sound proofing will stop the noise of a 100db train whistle. Also, the bedroom windows cannot be sound proofed to dampen 100 db.
    Last edited by UpAllNight; 14-02-2012 at 10:51 PM.

  45. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasH View Post
    Caveat Emptor indeed.

    Complaining about the train won't get you anywhere UpAllNight.
    Have you considered moving to another location?
    Have you considered soundproofing your house?
    Theres several jurisdictions where house value and proximity to traintracks has been carefully evaluated.

    There'd be an immediate depreciation in value of these lots/houses due to proximity to traintracks. With this being as close to traintracks as anything I've seen around here.

    I would wonder though if the developer discounted these particular lots. AS one buyer mentioned they simply didn't know how close their lot was going to be. To me that suggests lots were sold at full price in that area as well. Yikes.

    You can say Caveat Emptor. But this smacks of just being bad business alltogether.

    edit, wow, I just noted that those lots are graded BELOW the traintracks. Which essentially means the tracks, freight, and whistle would be directly level to the upstairs bedrooms of these houses.

    Unbelievable. I could see grading the houses well above the traintracks but below?
    Last edited by Replacement; 14-02-2012 at 10:50 PM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  46. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Theres several jurisdictions where house value and proximity to traintracks has been carefully evaluated.

    There'd be an immediate depreciation in value of these lots/houses due to proximity to traintracks. With this being as close to traintracks as anything I've seen around here.

    I would wonder though if the developer discounted these particular lots. AS one buyer mentioned they simply didn't know how close their lot was going to be. To me that suggests lots were sold at full price in that area as well. Yikes.

    You can say Caveat Emptor. But this smacks of just being bad business alltogether.
    There was no discount on the lots.

    Additionally, I inquired with the city's tax assessor in the area and although there is a property tax discount that can be applied for proximity to train tracks, the residents of Tamarack do not receive that tax discount. As a matter of fact, the assessor wasn't even aware that there was a train track in the area, and he said that there was nothing that could be done about it. He mentioned how he visited the area frequently and never heard a train.

    Like others who bought in the area, we were naive in believing that our government was looking out for us, and that this area was fit for residential zoning.

  47. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by UpAllNight View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Theres several jurisdictions where house value and proximity to traintracks has been carefully evaluated.

    There'd be an immediate depreciation in value of these lots/houses due to proximity to traintracks. With this being as close to traintracks as anything I've seen around here.

    I would wonder though if the developer discounted these particular lots. AS one buyer mentioned they simply didn't know how close their lot was going to be. To me that suggests lots were sold at full price in that area as well. Yikes.

    You can say Caveat Emptor. But this smacks of just being bad business alltogether.
    There was no discount on the lots.

    Additionally, I inquired with the city's tax assessor in the area and although there is a property tax discount that can be applied for proximity to train tracks, the residents of Tamarack do not receive that tax discount. As a matter of fact, the assessor wasn't even aware that there was a train track in the area, and he said that there was nothing that could be done about it. He mentioned how he visited the area frequently and never heard a train.

    Like others who bought in the area, we were naive in believing that our government was looking out for us, and that this area was fit for residential zoning.
    Its really unfortunate.

    In your situation I would carefully research any zoning restrictions in other jurisdictions and compile info on that with possible grounds to recourse against the developer, city, etc. or even in at least reducing property tax amounts. I'd take a camcorder and film the noise from the trains passing by your bedroom window. Rather than handhold the camera place it on the sill to get the full vibration impact.

    afairc home owner litigation occurred previously in a class action suit against the City, developers, and a firm that had assessed local cliff banks as being stable.
    I can't recall what exact resolution there was, I think theres information right on this site about that. Its a different situation because in that case the cliff banks were said to be stable before collapsing into the river valley. Basically a false bill of goods was sold on those homes.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...ide-taxes.html

    I'd even contact some of those homeowners and the legal firms involved and see what they might have to say about your situation. Definitely involve all your neighbors in this if you can.

    I've just got a laymans view on this overall. So take what I say with a grain of salt but good luck.
    Last edited by Replacement; 14-02-2012 at 11:15 PM.
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    I know I'm a little late in the thread but:

    They killed 3 people this week with their trains. Maybe they can spend some money on upgrading the technology used in the trains so that they can stop?

    How about a kid doesn't walk in the middle of the tracks with his headphones on blaring music (and probably texting)?

    Anyhoo, Tamarack is a dump. Like has been said, there's a railroad track nearby and it tends to have noisy, heavy whistle-blowing rattling' trains on it. It's not right you were lied to but it's also buyer beware. Like the governement, a small company or a large corporation they'll tell you whatever you want to hear to make a sale. Why would it be any different for a home?
    Last edited by Kitlope; 15-02-2012 at 12:25 AM.

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    CN is not an angel
    but
    trains blow their whistle. That is what they do.

    You should look at building a noise barrier fence, if the city will permit a higher than usual fence. Then, hang some sound deadening panels in affected rooms. Its worth a try.

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    I don't think it is fair to say that CN is a bully and that they killed three people. You can't expect a train to be able to stop on a dime when they see somebody is walking on the tracks. When you are standing or walking on train tracks there is always a likely hood that a train is going to come down the tracks and you have to be aware of that.

    In reading your petition it seems that a lot of people were misinformed by the homebuilder about how their property would be affected by the train tracks they should be the first people you go after for remediation. They are the ones who benefitted by providing misleading or false information.

    It does not make sense to get CN to move the right-of-way they have been using for a century. Getting them to stop blowing their horns may sound like the easiest thing to do first but I suppose that depends on what kind of crossings are further down the line that might have to changed.

    I just don't see why CN would want to do something that negatively effects them financially when they aren't responsible for the problem.

    I will take your advice about not buying property in Tamarack. It seemed like a nice enough community when I've been through it but I wasn't there when train was going by.

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    The most important thing that so many people have forgotten about these days is the old saying "Buyer Beware". When making any type of purchase big or small it's up to the buyer to do ALL the research before making their investment. Also common sense has to be used. As a buyer common sense would say that if I were to buy a house near train tracks, or a road like 99st or live near a fire hall as example, the likelyhood of being excessive noice surrounding me is going to be high.
    LRT is our future, time to push forward.

  52. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by UpAllNight View Post
    This is the 21st century, we've sent rovers to mars. But the safety measures used on trains is a whistle, the same whistle that was used 100 years ago.

    CN makes profits in excess of $500 million a quarter.

    They killed 3 people this week with their trains. Maybe they can spend some money on upgrading the technology used in the trains so that they can stop?

    Or, if it's going to save a few lives, take a few thousand out of your $500 million quarterly profits and pay for a spotter to drive ahead of the train in populated areas.

    Blowing a whistle is a joke. But hey, it sure is cost effective.
    "The tracks are in a grassy area between two fences, said Const. Jodi Heidinger of Leduc RCMP. Walking and biking trails run parallel to the tracks, she said, adding the area around the tracks is open to the public."

    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...256/story.html

    So putting up fences and providing trails isn't enough? Should CN have babysitters provided too?

  53. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmcowboy11 View Post
    The most important thing that so many people have forgotten about these days is the old saying "Buyer Beware". When making any type of purchase big or small it's up to the buyer to do ALL the research before making their investment. Also common sense has to be used. As a buyer common sense would say that if I were to buy a house near train tracks, or a road like 99st or live near a fire hall as example, the likelyhood of being excessive noice surrounding me is going to be high.
    Who could have reasonably foreseen that the houses and property they bought would be graded LOWER than the traintracks thereby resulting in the trains effectively running at elevation with the upstairs bedrooms in these houses. Not to mention if theres ever a derailment we're basically talking trains falling into the backyards if not directly onto the houses. Or talk about any potential toxic derailment and impending lawsuits then. This is just silly allowing this proximity.

    Who could have known HOW disruptive and noisy this would be given that theres no precedent of houses anywhere in this area to look at or assess that are this close to freight train tracks?

    Who could reasonably know how much the houses would shake rattle and roll until they were actually built and living in them?

    You can't just detect all this from going on site and standing there well before anything is built up.

    Everything from the grading, proximity, inadequate barrier, limited buffer zone is wrong with this development. Which the city and builders would have known.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  54. #54

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    Sounds more like "c'est la vie" than "caveat emptor".

    The buyers might feel like they were cheated, but I doubt that they would be able to receive a net benefit from litigation. What I would do is buy some ear plugs, and try to unload the house before it shakes itself apart. The sooner, the better, because property value will only be pushed down as time progresses, more damage occurs and more subdivisions become available for home buyers. It's an expensive lesson for learning not to trust people, but it's a valuable lesson.

    Based on the recent articles about damage done to homes by the LRT line, I wouldn't want to stick around to see the damage done by freight trains.

  55. #55

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    Well he could fight to stop any further non-approved development adjacent to the tracks.

  56. #56

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    how are we coming up with the fact the houses are graded lower than the tracks? I see a sound berm with a fence on top of it on streetview on google maps...

  57. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by bolo View Post
    Sounds more like "c'est la vie" than "caveat emptor".

    The buyers might feel like they were cheated, but I doubt that they would be able to receive a net benefit from litigation. What I would do is buy some ear plugs, and try to unload the house before it shakes itself apart. The sooner, the better, because property value will only be pushed down as time progresses, more damage occurs and more subdivisions become available for home buyers. It's an expensive lesson for learning not to trust people, but it's a valuable lesson.

    Based on the recent articles about damage done to homes by the LRT line, I wouldn't want to stick around to see the damage done by freight trains.
    For sure. Its a lesson. But what kind of developer really swings these kind of deals. This might be considered "business" in new narcissistic times but it certainly isn't customer driven service business that is likely to lead to any referrals, good word of mouth, or repeat business or loyal customers.

    The developer selling these lots as is on 11th street amounts to little more than a scam. Downloading property they probably got cheap and hoping somebody will pay top price.

    People shouldn't, I agree, but in a province with a large migrant work population coming in do we really want to be associated with such scam developers. Really I think operators like this give us all a bad name. Its a ripoof anyway you shake it. I can't imagine anybody on 11th street is happy with their purchase.

    I have no horses in this either. Just a concerned citizen that would prefer that business in this city, or province, isn't conducted by and large like this.



    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    how are we coming up with the fact the houses are graded lower than the tracks? I see a sound berm with a fence on top of it on streetview on google maps...
    Fair point. You could be right. I probably jumped the gun on that from looking at streetview. I'll check it out some time on a bike ride. I'm only a few miles from there.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

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    A berm or fence or being ten feet higher or lower than the tracks is of little more than cosmetic value with thundering great locomotives and rumbling wagons blasting horns at all hours.

    As others have mentioned earlier, I wouldn't be holding a lot of hope for the concrete foundations. If these were in the process of setting while trains were rolling by, the aggregate in the concrete would surely have been vibrated to the bottom of the wall, leaving diminished strength further up. And the ground is marshy, to boot. And City engineers passed this land as suitable for construction in the first place? Jeez. This was a dumb location from day one.
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  59. #59

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    It's nice of Replacement to start this thread to warn others of this, apparently, mess of a development. If it was me who had made this mistake, I'd be trying to keep the news as silent as possible, in the hope I could sell my place to a biger sucker than I was.

  60. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    It's nice of Replacement to start this thread to warn others of this, apparently, mess of a development. If it was me who had made this mistake, I'd be trying to keep the news as silent as possible, in the hope I could sell my place to a biger sucker than I was.
    huh? I didn't start the thead, and I'm not involved in anyway other than just commenting like you or anybody else.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  61. #61

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    ^oh, its been a rough day. Sorry Replacement. Nice of the OP Brent.

  62. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    For sure. Its a lesson. But what kind of developer really swings these kind of deals. This might be considered "business" in new narcissistic times but it certainly isn't customer driven service business that is likely to lead to any referrals, good word of mouth, or repeat business or loyal customers.

    The developer selling these lots as is on 11th street amounts to little more than a scam. Downloading property they probably got cheap and hoping somebody will pay top price.

    People shouldn't, I agree, but in a province with a large migrant work population coming in do we really want to be associated with such scam developers. Really I think operators like this give us all a bad name. Its a ripoof anyway you shake it. I can't imagine anybody on 11th street is happy with their purchase.

    I have no horses in this either. Just a concerned citizen that would prefer that business in this city, or province, isn't conducted by and large like this.
    Agreed, I hope that they do an expose on the whole development/builder to serve as a warning to everyone. But as a resident, I would be doing my damnedest to extricate myself from the area. As word gets out (as is happening right now), property values are going to be depressed relative to other subdivisions. This is unavoidable and can be considered a proper market correction (to reflect the undesirability of the train line). So it's best to get out, before the value bottoms out. The other consideration is the damage that will accumulate the longer one waits (so sucking it up and staying put may be untenuble, unless you count on luck and insurance saying you from disaster).

    Yes, this entails finding another sucker to pawn the house off on (hopefully before the market value has dropped too much) and perpetuating the scam that the developer started (until someone is ok living by train tracks). But a righteous crusade to sue the builder/developer/railway/city/etc would be very costly, time-consuming and heart-wrenching. If that's the way someone wants to go, all the power to them. But if they simply want to live their lives as best and quietly as they can, it is probably time to cut and run now.

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    I think the city and developer is partly responsible for this development. My worry is if a train carrying chemicals derails south of the Whitemud, there could be serious consequences.
    "Talk minus action equals zero." - Joe Keithley, D. O. A.

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    The City has to approve, after having had engineers' reports, of the suitability of any proposed land. So no developer could have gone ahead with a subdivision without prior approval of the City. This means the City knew full well about the subsoil/soil composition of marshland, and they obviously knew of the proximity to an active railway line. Yet they gave it the go-ahead, leaving it up to a developer who most likely got some sort of sweet deal and proceeded to gloss over the shortcomings to prospective buyers. Nice way to do business.

    The parcel could have been landscaped into a park, a far more suitable solution, but then parks don't generate taxes.
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  65. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cat View Post
    I think one thing that might help the Tamarack subdivision could be a hill between the CN tracks and subdivision to buffer/deflect some of the sound. This line does have a lot of train traffic, and I can't think of another neighbourhood that is that close to a direct train line.
    There are lots of communities that have homes as close or even closer. Just look at Hermitage (which had a derailment at 50th street this summer), Clairview (by the LRT station), Kirkness or Dunvegan, where homes are only 75 feet from the tracks. The TOD on Fort Road will be built right beside CN tracks as well. The original plan was to put condos within 35 feet of the tracks before I pointed out to the planners that CN would not allow them. They were moved 4 times further away.

    Noise is one thing but do the buyers think about something worse like the Mississauga train disaster where 200,000 people had to be evacuated?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1979_Mi...ain_derailment


    Did the buyers in Tamarack really think about location, location, location? This is just like the power line issue. Tank cars full of molten sulphur, LNG and chlorine make one big mess. Tamarack buyers could see the tracks, they were not hidden or put there after they bought.
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  66. #66

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    Maybe this belongs in the HSR thread but since this thread one is about trains, just watch

    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

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    I don't know, I just think its simple common sense to know your surroundings. I'm sorry if I sound condesending or anything like that but I find that too many people don't pay attention until it's too late and then have problems even though it was their own choice. Another example is if someone moves to live in the downtown core and then complains that it is too noisy from all the pedestrian and vehicle traffic.
    LRT is our future, time to push forward.

  68. #68

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    They cannot see past the hardwood floors, granite counter tops and the place for their 60" TV
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  69. #69

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    "Location, Location, Location - the three things you look for when buying a house."

    Sorry not sure who orginally made this statement, but its almost a rule of life just like death and taxes!

    Who cares what kind of split level front grarage attached house with a BONUS room over the garage you are buying they are all pretty much the same these days (well except entrance door on left or right side of garage). Location is what you are paying for.

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    I was out walking in this area today so I decided to see where the train tracks were in relation to the houses.
    I was expecting to walk along the tracks and peer into people backyards. Well, there is a big berm between the yards and the tracks. To me (in my opinion). It looks like
    the tracks are no higher than than the street level. If you were in your kitchen
    I suspect you may only see the tops of the train passing. Agreed though if you
    were in your bedroom I think you would be able to have a birds eye view of what was passing.
    I saw a Landmark showhome about 3-4 blocks from the tracks, went in and looked
    around. As I was leaving I asked the sales guy about the train and noise. He said he
    rarely even notices, but admitted he does not sleep in the show home.
    Now, I'm just saying, I do not think I would buy a house that close to train tracks. It's a bit asking a sales car guy, is this a good car.

    I'm not sure of the purpose of your petition is. Those CN tracks have been there for decades. You want the tracks relocated, oh, that is a great precedent. Now taxpayers will be on the hook to get train tracks everywhere moved where they are
    within 100m of houses ( just like powerlines - that's another rant).
    The bigger question is why did the city allow housing to be developed so
    close to the tracks ?
    Long story short, before I bought my house, I checked city hall to see what the
    long range plans for the area are/were. Even was wary of the 2 lane road that goes through the neighbourhood in case it gets upgraded to 4 lanes.
    What was the price for those houses that back up to the rail line ? Did you get a deal
    with the purchase price.

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    ^ In addition, perhaps tax payers should start their own petition to show our support for the province/ business where they had the foresight to allocate land for TUC's, LRT ROW's, train tracks and the like. All to often it seems like the squeaky wheel gets the grease.

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    I drove in the neighbourhood late last week as well. Pretty much saw the same thing. The tracks are close to the same grade as the surrounding terrain. There is a berm with a fence on top of the berm. The biggest problem is that on the residential side of the fence you are in the homeowner's back yard. That is too close to the tracks. I'm not sure why anyone would buy houses backing onto tracks like that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by UpAllNight View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasH View Post
    Caveat Emptor indeed.

    Complaining about the train won't get you anywhere UpAllNight.
    Have you considered moving to another location?
    Have you considered soundproofing your house?
    I appreciate your concern but I think you are wrong. Complaining about problems is how things get improved. Laying down or walking away is not to going to solve any problems. If I move another family is going to move into this house and face the same problem.

    There are avenues for addressing this problem, and I'm also exploring those.

    PS Short of using 6 inches of solid concrete for walls, no level of sound proofing will stop the noise of a 100db train whistle. Also, the bedroom windows cannot be sound proofed to dampen 100 db.
    No, you are wrong given that you moved into a neighbourhood that is next to a heavy rail line. They have been building houses next to railways for over 100 years. Yes, there will be noise. Yes, there will be vibrations. But at the end of the day placing residential land uses next to a railway is deemed to be acceptable and reasonable.

    As an FYI, the developer was required to submit a Catastrophic Risk Assessment and Noise Assessment as part of the approval of the neighbourhood. These were reviewed and signed off by the City and CN.
    Last edited by ChrisD; 20-02-2012 at 09:07 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SP59 View Post
    I drove in the neighbourhood late last week as well. Pretty much saw the same thing. The tracks are close to the same grade as the surrounding terrain. There is a berm with a fence on top of the berm. The biggest problem is that on the residential side of the fence you are in the homeowner's back yard. That is too close to the tracks. I'm not sure why anyone would buy houses backing onto tracks like that.
    For the same reason why people buy houses backing onto a large commercial development or freeway. The market chooses where they wish to live.

  75. #75

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    I'm sure you will eventually get used to it. When I was living in Slave Lake, my first apartment was an old building not well insulated and since I could hear the neighbours all around me, not very well sound proof either. The tracks were across the small parking lot and eventually I slept through the train shaking the building and it's horn throughout the night. Slave Lake is built on marsh land and there was no berm.

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    The harsh advice to the original poster is that if he ever finds himself in this situation again, it's easier to sell and get out if you don't raise a fuss on the internet chat boards.

    Sorry.

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    A simple question to ask, if they were going to close the line down why would the city (and province) pay to build a tunnel (bridge/culvert whatever you decide to call it) on Whitemud? They would have saved their money and put in a level crossing as they did at Yellowhead and about 68th street (that one is now removed).

  78. #78

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    Im presently very much considering buying a home that would back onto these tracks, however on the east side in the new subdivision Maple Crest..im actually supposed to be signing final papers this week.. Ive been trying to do as much research as I can, im a 1st time buyer of a new home in a new development so i've just been googling Tamarack and Maple Crest and so far this is the best forum ive come across.. I did consider noise, which I think I would eventually get used to, the price is much lower than in any of the other new subdivisions, which was very attractive, location being close to whitemud and henday as well as transit centre and new rec centre also made me think this was a great location.. However after reading over all the above, im getting very concerned about the foundation stability with it being on marshland as well as that close to cn railway line.. Is this a very serious concern, would I be a total ***** to purchase this home and lot? Please someone be completely straight and honest with me..?? And I thought my only concern was possibly choosing to move into a dominate south asian area and my family being a minority..

  79. #79

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    There's good reason why things are so cheap out there, and you've identified them.i don't think I could deal with trains all night long.

  80. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by kimandjf View Post
    I am surprised this link still exisits...

    This post is to all doing their homework, as my husband and I did. You most likely stumbled on this link, just as we had.

    We made an educated decision to live in Tamarack. We googled, binged, yahooed...with searched numerous search engines from comments on the neighbourhood. We also canvased the neighbourhood where we were looking at purchasing, we asked about the builder, the neighbourhood...and obviously, the train.

    Fact is folks, when you drive to the neighbourhood coming from the anthony henday, you drive over top of the train tracks. You can see it exists from 17st.


    Reality is, any new neighbourhood you look at now (other than greisbach) has train tracks, power lines, or the anthony henday OR you are ridiculously far from the city. There is going to be something around the neighbourhood.

    My family and I consider ourselves extremely lucky to live in Tamarack. Although we loath the idea of more development in the area, we are excited to live here for years to come! (I promise you, this is such a tranquil area to live in when the contruction goes home! The openness, the wildlife, everything - it is amazing!)

    Tamarack IS an amazing place to live. The city is at your fingertips! WEM is only 15 minutes away (less once the whitemud construction is done!) 20 minutes will get you anywhere you want to go in the city! The residents are beyond friendly, the school is close, shopping is close... It is just an amazing place to live.

    The trains...the trains are the least of my worries living here. You here it every now and then, but just as much as you would anywhere else! The worst part of Tamarack is that it has to keep growing...and I know it will...it is just to great of a place to live!

    If you take anything from this thread, let it be to do your research. Do as we did, search the crap out of the neighbourhood you plan to move in, canvas the neighbourhood, not just the block you would like to live on, but the neighbourhood. Hang out there for a day, have a picnic, exist as a resident there...and then make your decision. If you don't do your research, then you don't have the right to complain afterwards...especially over something like a train track.

    Good luck...
    does your home back onto tracks? how long have you lived there? any problems with your foundation?

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    Considering that this line leads to the new Conrich rail yard northeast of Calgary and that CN developed one of its sidings SE of Edmonton, that they had sat on for a century, means that this won't be going anywhere for quite a long time.
    Last edited by TerryH; 02-12-2012 at 11:54 PM.

  82. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    would I be a total ***** to purchase this home and lot? Please someone be completely straight and honest with me..??.
    You wouldn't be a total *****, but you'd be a bit of an *****. Let me explain: cheaper house means cheaper materials. One of the biggest savings will come from crappy windows. Crappy windows let in a lot of heat in the summer. You will not be able to sleep with windows open in the summer due to train noise. So you will need air conditioning, which would be working heavy to compensate for your crappy windows.

    There's a big difference between cheap and good value, and I think you're potentially moving into a cheap neighbourhood.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  83. #83

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    Cheap homes can also come from cheap land values due to an undesirable location.
    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

  84. #84

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    I'm looking at the site plans for Tamarack and Maple Crest, and I find it odd that the developers wouldn't put laned homes against the tracks, so there's garages helping to block noise. Is it because of the cost to put in lanes with homes on only one side?
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  85. #85

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    Or walls...
    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

  86. #86
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    cinsha, for several reasons Maple Crest's location is worse than even the adjoining Tamarack neighbourhood.

    These reasons include:

    * needing to go over a level rail crossing to get into and out of the neighbourhood. What if there was a derailment or even a serious accident at the crossing? And as several other posters have pointed out, this is the main CN line going south to Calgary, not some branch line. It is reasonable to expect that rail traffic will continue to grow in the years ahead (in terms of frequency, length and weight of trains).

    * why was the developer (Dundee) allowed to cheap out by building an earth berm way below the level of the two-story homes that back right onto it? Second, why was the developer allowed to build a cheap wooden fence on top of the berm rather than a cinder block fence that is both more durable and blocks noise better? Check out Dundee Developments (and its related companies) donations to the Mayor and City Councillors in the 2010 municipal election and you might get at least part of your answer. Link: http://www.edmonton.ca/city_governme...tatements.aspx

    * The north boundary of the neighbourhood is Whitemud Drive and the east boundary is Henday Drive. Vehicle traffic (including heavy truck traffic) will only grow in the years ahead. Even if you lived in the very centre of the neighbourhood, traffic noise would never be less than a dull roar.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    would I be a total ***** to purchase this home and lot? Please someone be completely straight and honest with me..??.
    You wouldn't be a total *****, but you'd be a bit of an *****. Let me explain: cheaper house means cheaper materials. One of the biggest savings will come from crappy windows. Crappy windows let in a lot of heat in the summer. You will not be able to sleep with windows open in the summer due to train noise. So you will need air conditioning, which would be working heavy to compensate for your crappy windows.

    There's a big difference between cheap and good value, and I think you're potentially moving into a cheap neighbourhood.
    really??? i know at least one builder who is presently negotiating with his suppliers to put triple pane windows in all of their houses as a standard spec. based on the quantities, it will be nominally less expensive than the double pane windows being used now as everyone from supplier to trades gets to standardaize. you'll see the benefit even on the "cheap houses" as they piggy back on what was originally introduced on more expensive homes and more recently available as an optional upgrade on less costly models...

    you're welcome to your opinion on the neighborhood and whether it would offer value for you or not but the actual builder's standard homes don't in fact vary from neighborhood to neighborhood. a particular "model" in tamarack is the same model with the same spec's you would purchase in the hamptons or sherwood park or newcastle or fort saskatchewan or anywhere else. it's too expensive to build otherwise (and i will except the "one off" back of a pick up truck builders from this discussion but you probably won't find them in tamarack).

    in virtually all cases, if there is a difference in the price of the home, it is a reflection of a difference in the lot price, not the construction price.
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  88. #88

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    If they're using better windows, good on them! The buyer needs to beware these things.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  89. #89
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    My girlfriend bought and has been in Tamarack for more than a year, and she really likes it. They're raising funds for a new playground now.

    A lot of the people moving into the neighbourhood seem to be relatively recent immigrants. Especially Filipinos. Owning a home is a big part of their "dream".
    aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

  90. #90

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    the house I am possibly buying does have the triple pane windows as a standard, the lot price is in my opinion the reason why this area is less expensive, and that could be definately because of where the lot is located (se edmonton and/or behind a railway line). Still not sure what to do about my final decision?? im more concerned about the home having foundation problems because of the marsh and railway traffic, but not sure if that is something builder looked into greatly since they do offer a 10 year structural warranty..? Thanks all so far for your comments, its great to hear others opinions.. good and bad

  91. #91

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    I havent signed the papers just yet.. is the train noise really that bad? how often does it go by per day/per week? does it usually travel more through the night? has it caused any foundation problems to your home? I look forward to your reply

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    I havent signed the papers just yet.. is the train noise really that bad? how often does it go by per day/per week? does it usually travel more through the night? has it caused any foundation problems to your home? I look forward to your reply
    I'm sure everybody has their own level of tolerance, but here is my honest to God feedback:

    We sold our house on the train line (on 11th St.) in Tamarack in March this year after 3 years of living there (ie. suffering). Train noise is HORRIBLE. You will not be able to keep your windows open. The train goes by many times during the day and night. I woke up every time the train passed by at night, even though husband slept through it like a log. By late 2011, the trains had started honking during the nights for some reason, which made sleeping even worse.

    The worst part is the vibration. The whole house shook... including light fixtures. It felt like a mini earthquake. You'd think after three years you'd get used to the noise and vibration... we never did. Also, with all this you live in constant stress for the fear of not being able to sell your house. At the end of three years we sold it at a $1000 loss .. and considered ourselves lucky (having bought in 2008.)

    Maple Crest, IMO is worse, as you have to cross the train signal to get in or out (and we're talking very long slow freight trains.) Also, you don't have the benefit of being really close to the school, which is one positive train line houses have in Tamarack.

    In short, as the title says: AVOID. Laurel (on 23rd, west of 17th) might be a better option, as prices are about the same. Maybe get an independent realtor to give you their opinion.

  93. #93
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    ^^It probably because of having to cross Maple Road since it's a level crossing. The CN line in Grande Prairie had its units use the horn in the city, even at the crossing next to the QE2 hospital.

  94. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceebs View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    I havent signed the papers just yet.. is the train noise really that bad? how often does it go by per day/per week? does it usually travel more through the night? has it caused any foundation problems to your home? I look forward to your reply
    I'm sure everybody has their own level of tolerance, but here is my honest to God feedback:

    We sold our house on the train line (on 11th St.) in Tamarack in March this year after 3 years of living there (ie. suffering). Train noise is HORRIBLE. You will not be able to keep your windows open. The train goes by many times during the day and night. I woke up every time the train passed by at night, even though husband slept through it like a log. By late 2011, the trains had started honking during the nights for some reason, which made sleeping even worse.

    The worst part is the vibration. The whole house shook... including light fixtures. It felt like a mini earthquake. You'd think after three years you'd get used to the noise and vibration... we never did. Also, with all this you live in constant stress for the fear of not being able to sell your house. At the end of three years we sold it at a $1000 loss .. and considered ourselves lucky (having bought in 2008.)

    Maple Crest, IMO is worse, as you have to cross the train signal to get in or out (and we're talking very long slow freight trains.) Also, you don't have the benefit of being really close to the school, which is one positive train line houses have in Tamarack.

    In short, as the title says: AVOID. Laurel (on 23rd, west of 17th) might be a better option, as prices are about the same. Maybe get an independent realtor to give you their opinion.
    Thank you for your opinion Did it take long to sell? was your house set back far from the tracks? did you have triple plane windows? How did you find the school there? and did you ever have foundation problems? the lot size on this home im considering is 700+ sq meters big which to me is the nicest thing about the whole deal.. hard to find a new house with a lot that size anywhere and thats really something I could value.. the house is set back quite aways from the tracks, but not sure it is enough.. I have visited this area at least 20 times and have only had to wait once for a train, about 5 minutes so it didnt seem too bad.. the train didnt blow its horn and im not sure if it was because it was daytime or if its because its now a controlled crossing where the big rail arm comes down with the flashing lights.. hope to get more feedback from you or anyone else who cares to comment, Thanks, everything I read on here regarding this area is very helpful and very appreciated

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by UpAllNight View Post
    On Monday a CN train killed a kid in Leduc. Funny, the train's horn wasn't an effective safety measure. No ****! How about driving at a speed that will allow you to stop? No, that would cut into profits.
    Quote Originally Posted by UpAllNight View Post
    They killed 3 people this week with their trains. Maybe they can spend some money on upgrading the technology used in the trains so that they can stop?


    A loaded freight train weighs about twenty thousand tons.

    Twenty thousand tons.

    (That's forty million pounds, or about 150 times the maximum takeoff weight of a Boeing 747)

    There is literally no way to stop it any faster than the air brakes they use now.

    Every time a train goes 1 km/h faster, it needs another 25 ft to stop, plus reaction time for the engineer and application time (up to 10 seconds per car), and plus additional distance under icy conditions or with equipment later in a service cycle.

    For instance, at a comfortable walking speed, a train under emergency braking will stop in about 150 feet.

    Travelling as fast as a bicycle, a train will take about the length of a football field to come to a complete stop.

    It scales up so fast that there's no possible way to move a train at a reasonable speed without a potentially dangerous braking distance.

    If you think "Stop the train" is a solution for any problem besides "How can we get this stuff on or off that train?", you're woefully misguided.

  96. #96

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    So wait a minute: the only way in or out of Maple Crest is over at-grade train tracks? No over/underpass? Hells no. If there's an emergency and there's a train, you're screwed. I don't even want to think about how frustrating it would be if something happened to a train and it blocked the roads.

    Looking at the map again it appears you'll eventually be able to leave via 23rd ave eastbound, but geez, only one road in or out right now and it's over a rail crossing seems awfully sketchy.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    Thank you for your opinion Did it take long to sell? was your house set back far from the tracks? did you have triple plane windows? How did you find the school there? and did you ever have foundation problems? the lot size on this home im considering is 700+ sq meters big which to me is the nicest thing about the whole deal.. hard to find a new house with a lot that size anywhere and thats really something I could value.. the house is set back quite aways from the tracks, but not sure it is enough.. I have visited this area at least 20 times and have only had to wait once for a train, about 5 minutes so it didnt seem too bad.. the train didnt blow its horn and im not sure if it was because it was daytime or if its because its now a controlled crossing where the big rail arm comes down with the flashing lights.. hope to get more feedback from you or anyone else who cares to comment, Thanks, everything I read on here regarding this area is very helpful and very appreciated
    It took about 3 months to sell to house. We did not have triple pane windows, but we did have one of them huge pie lots - set back quite a ways from the train line. Having a big lot was good, but half of it extended on to the berm, which defeated the whole purpose of enjoying a big lot (except for tobogganing in winter.) A lot of people rejected the house based on that reason alone. I don't know how it is on the other side in Maple Crest. We weren't aware of any foundation problems in the first three years at least. I don't know about now. Don't have personal experience with the school, but I've heard good things about it.

    Triple pane windows might help with sound, but I doubt it'll do much for vibrations. But like I said, it's about your own tolerance level. When we bought, we were in a pretty desperate situation. We lived in an adult-only building and had a baby on the way, so we had to find a new place when there was a rental shortage everywhere. The value of the house with a huge lot seemed really good at the time, considering how hot the housing market was, and the mortgage was coming out to be lower than what we were paying for a one-bedroom in the university area. We knew about the train line, but because this was a start-up home, we thought we could put up with it for a few years. We had made a few trips to the area to check the noise level, and it didn't seem so bad until we started living there. I hate to admit it, but vibrations weren't something we even considered. It was a really REALLY stupid mistake on our part. I couldn't wait to get out. When I think back, I shudder. Sorry to sound so melodramatic, but I'm just giving you my personal opinion.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    I don't even want to think about how frustrating it would be if something happened to a train and it blocked the roads.
    Yep, that happened every once in a while when the train would come to a halt just behind my backyard.

  99. #99
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    There is only ONE road in and out of there? Hasn't the city learned anything from the Millwoods Pipeline Fire of 1979? Back then there where very few accesses in and out of Millwoods so when the truck had an accident it triggered a fire where it was very hard to evacuate people.
    http://news.google.com/newspapers?ni...pg=4232,820690

    I know the future plans have another connecting to 23rd Ave, but I don't think it's been built yet.
    http://www.livemaplecrest.com/communitymap.aspx

    As for the train, unless CN decides to move the tracks along the TUC (unlikely but they might have HST there in the future so its a remote possibility) they are unlikely to ever close that line.

  100. #100

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    Looking at google maps, and zooming into the newest 45 degree images, if emergency was to occur, there is 2 dirt roads that could be used to get out/in from meridian road... but yikes. You'd have to pay me to live here.

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