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Thread: Help: stolen bicycle

  1. #1

    Unhappy Help: stolen bicycle

    Bike was stolen from my home in the west end (La Perle) on the evening of Thursday, June 29. Bike looks similar to the one shown in the picture (custom built). If anyone sees anything, please let me know ASAP, thanks!

    Brand: Giant
    Model: NRS
    Color: Team Blue
    Other: has gel seat cover, eggbeater pedals, speedometer

    Thief came in through backyard, left his/her own bike behind and rode away with mine. If anyone sees a posting here or any other Edmonton area sites, I would greatly appreciate help in tracking it down. This incident has been reported to EPS.


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    I wish you the best of luck, and I'll keep my eyes open. I've had two stolen in the last year, and there are others on this forum who've been victims as well.

    Bike theft is rampant in Edmonton, and other cities (but especially Edmonton), and most often people do not get their bike back. I hope the various police services are on this - bikes these days cost hundreds or thousands of dollars, and bike theft is big business.

    I wonder if there's an organized crime element involved that ships stolen bikes to other places or strips the parts. There's no way 1500 bikes a year can just disappear in Edmonton.
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    I remember seeing something on the National saying that organized crime is responsible for a significant percentage of the bike thefts in Canada, and I would assume that the same can be said for Edmonton (we are a part of Canada afterall).

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    Getting your bike stolen sucks, sorry to hear of your loss.

    I wonder where all these stolen bikes go. I can only think of one bike I've owned in my life that wasn't stolen. Surely the bike market in Edmonton is not that hot, so they must end up somewhere else. Unless there is an underground bike cult in Millwoods that I don't know about.

    I won't even bother with bikes anymore. Walking works fine!

  5. #5

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    There's no way 1500 bikes a year can just disappear in Edmonton.
    There's about a dozen natives that hang out at a joint by my place and all of them have nice bicycles, and I can say with confidence from their clothing and hygiene that these folks didn't walk into United Cycle and purchase them. Throw in the pile of bikes every week I see bent and wrecked around town as I tour about, and I don't think 1500 stolen bikes a year would be very difficult for those that have no fear of consequences.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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    I once bought a used bike at a pawn shop. A mistake.

    Outside two guys rode up. They looked like they lived outdoors, but they both had Specialized mountain bikes. They seemed kind of naive, and I didn't get the feeling they were thieves, but maybe customers. Who knows, people who can afford nice Specialized mountain bikes usually have homes and jobs. They told me their bikes were "river bikes', and said all you had to do was go down to the river valley (where?), and there were some nice bikes, just layin' around.

    I got the feeling they were putting out feelers to see if I'd be interested in buying a used bike, but maybe that's just my suspicious nature. I just bought a bike (subsequently stolen), I was in a hurry, and I'm not interested in buying a used $800 bike for $40 from a street guy, so I moved on. I should have asked some more questions I suppose. I still see them sometimes in the Critical Mass ride.

    The whole point of a speculated organized crime connection is that it isn't just in Edmonton, but that they have an organized network that can ship bikes between cities. There isn't only a market for bikes, but also for parts, including frames. EBay makes it that much simpler.

    I keep my bike in my cubicle at work, and inside my apartment at home. I pay $20/mo for a bike locker in a downtown Oxford highrise, and even when I lock it in the lockup, I lock my bike up. I use two locks when I lock up my bike, and I make sure it's in a highly visible location, with both wheels locked. I haven't insured it yet, but I'm going to.

    Please let us know if you get your bike back. The police find a lot of bikes that aren't claimed, so it's important to follow up. Check Kijiji and Craiglist, etc, of course, but nobody seems to have much luck with that. But you might, or you may find another bike, from a legitimate private seller. Some people buy nice bikes, especially mountain bikes, don't have time to ride them, and then just sell them off. With some maintenance, they can be as good as new for half the price or less.
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    Sorry to hear your bike got jacked. I'm always paranoid about getting my new bike stolen, so I keep it in my kitchen. And no, I don't even trust the garage since my buddy had his stolen from his garage while he was sleeping.

    Having some insurance on the bike couldn't hurt as that is how my buddy was able to purchase a new bike.

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    Default A good site to post your stolen bike

    http://edmontonbikes.ca/stolenbikes/

    just got the link in my EBC newsletter.
    aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

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    Here's something on topic that happened last week that I thought was very good to see.

    Good friends own Prism bar & grill at 101 st & 105 ave. One night early last week one of their staff had a fairly unique and vintage Sekine touring bike stolen from the back of the building where it was chained up. The bike wasn't worth much but had quite a bit of sentimental value to its' owner.

    My friends employ some of the locals to help sweep up the parking lot and keep the outside of the building clean, and a lot of the homeless people respect them because they treat them with a level of dignity that most don't. My friends put the word out that the bike had been stolen and that there was a $50 reward for its' return.

    Well one of the fellows that cleans the lot spent the weekend scouring the downtown area and found the bike abandonned in the brush beside the Shaw. He held the bike for two days to ensure it got back to its' rightful owner. Needless to say, the bikes' owner was extremely suprised that she ever saw the bike again. My friend the bar owner said she's never seen someone so proud as when the homeless guy wheeled that bike in to return to its' owner. Sure, it's the $50, but it was also a senseo f pride and accomplishment that I don't think a lot of those guys get to experience very often.
    Last edited by 240GLT; 03-07-2009 at 02:04 PM.

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    Wow... great story. I'm glad the bike was returned.

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    ^^ Yes! That's good to hear. Thanks for the post.
    aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

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    The problem seems to be that people are spending way too much $ on bikes now and thereby making it an attractive target for theft.

    Personally I don't recall ever paying more than 400-500bucks for a bike and have never had a problem with theft.

    I can do a little less with the bike and give up some comfort but I do have the comfort of knowing the bike will always be there when I return.

    Spending over a grand on a bike which by nature is very vulnerable to theft seems like a poor decision.

    Sorry to seem un-supportive but the solution to bike theft is fairly easy.

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    So the solution to bike theft is not to have a nice bike? Sorry, that "solution" don't work for me. I'm certain most feel the same. Spending over a grand )actually closer to 3 grand all-in) was one of the best decisions I've ever made. Not a poor decision at all.

    To take it one step further, not having bikes at all completely solves the bike theft problem. Car theft - same thing. Get rid of all cars - problem solved. Guitars seem to be a target too.

    Aren't we allowed to have anything nice anymore?

    By the way, I still have my nice bike. The two bikes I've had stolen this year (locked indoors in a secure building using two locks) cost $500 and $350 respectively. So much for that theory.

    Too much is obviously different for you than it is for me. I like my nice bike. Maybe if you don't ride a lot, or use your bike mostly for relaxed Sunday rides, or if you've never ridden a better bike, it might not be a big deal. There's a big difference in riding between a $200+ bike and a $2000+ bike, a difference I appreciate daily.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 04-07-2009 at 08:00 PM.
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  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    So the solution to bike theft is not to have a nice bike? Sorry, that "solution" don't work for me. I'm certain most feel the same. Spending over a grand )actually closer to 3 grand all-in) was one of the best decisions I've ever made. Not a poor decision at all.

    To take it one step further, not having bikes at all completely solves the bike theft problem. Car theft - same thing. Get rid of all cars - problem solved. Guitars seem to be a target too.

    Aren't we allowed to have anything nice anymore?

    By the way, I still have my nice bike. The two bikes I've had stolen this year (locked indoors in a secure building using two locks) cost $500 and $350 respectively. So much for that theory.

    Too much is obviously different for you than it is for me. I like my nice bike. Maybe if you don't ride a lot, or use your bike mostly for relaxed Sunday rides, or if you've never ridden a better bike, it might not be a big deal. There's a big difference in riding between a $200+ bike and a $2000+ bike, a difference I appreciate daily.
    I've driven countless 1000's of kilos on bikes and for several decades. I've done Jasper to Banff, I routinely ride 100k, I've commuted, I've had no problem but a sore butt which I will say starts to adapt.

    I simply don't see the problem with a cheap bike. Bikes were meant to be cheap. Its really a large point to them as vehicles. I'm sure the vast majority of the world that rides cheap bikes agrees with me on that one.

    I have no idea why you think I am so limited by my choice in cheap bikes. (Only limitation being extreme rock hopping rides which I have no interest in anyway)
    I've driven cheap touring and mountain bikes and never a problem in close to 5 decades.

    If anything the less technological alloys seem to be more forgiving of some curb transgressions than the latest lightweight rim benders of the day.

    As for your query "aren't we allowed to have anything nice anymore" of course you are but expenisve bikes being very visible of course elicit theft which was my whole point.

    I don't tend to have expensive things that are highly visible. Its been a sensible approach.

    I avoid theft in this way.
    Last edited by Replacement; 04-07-2009 at 08:35 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    I've driven countless 1000's of kilos on bikes and for several decades. I've done Jasper to Banff, I routinely ride 100k, I've commuted, I've had no problem but a sore butt which I will say starts to adapt.

    I simply don't see the problem with a cheap bike. Bikes were meant to be cheap. Its really a large point to them as vehicles. I'm sure the vast majority of the world that rides cheap bikes agrees with me on that one.

    I have no idea why you think I am so limited with my choice in cheap bikes. (Only limitation being extreme rock hopping rides which I have no interest in anyway)
    I've driven cheap touring and mountain bikes and never a problem in close to 5 decades.

    If anything the less technological alloys seem to be more forgiving of some curb transgressions than the latest lightweight rim benders of the day.

    As for your query "aren't we allowed to have anything nice anymore" of course you are but expenisve bikes being very visible of course elicit theft which was my whole point.

    I don't tend to have expensive things that are highly visible. Its been a sensible approach.

    I avoid theft in this way.
    Aluminum (Cromoloy) doesn't rust, for one thing, which is important if you ride in wet conditions and snow. Ride a nice bike, properly set up, for a day, and if you can't see the difference, then stick with the cheaper bike. Some people just aren't that sensitive to what I find to be significant differences. Like I said, I've had three bikes over the last couple of years. The other two were tanks compared to my TriCross Comp.

    I ride a lot, as do you, and many others on this forum as well. I'd be interested to see how many appreciate a nice bike. There's no problem with cheap bikes at all (I'm looking at getting a vintage "grocery getter"), and the differences may be wasted on some who don't require anything better, but they get stolen too.

    There's never been anything that said bikes were meant to be cheap.

    Personally, given that my bike takes the place of a car, I think $2500 is pretty cheap compared with even entry level cars, and the maintenance, parking, insurance, gas, etc I don't have to pay for makes it the best personal finance decision I've ever made.

    Owning the crappiest bike on the block isn't going to solve the problem in any way, but it will make for a far less pleasurable daily commute for me. I love my bike.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 04-07-2009 at 08:59 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    I've driven countless 1000's of kilos on bikes and for several decades. I've done Jasper to Banff, I routinely ride 100k, I've commuted, I've had no problem but a sore butt which I will say starts to adapt.

    I simply don't see the problem with a cheap bike. Bikes were meant to be cheap. Its really a large point to them as vehicles. I'm sure the vast majority of the world that rides cheap bikes agrees with me on that one.

    I have no idea why you think I am so limited with my choice in cheap bikes. (Only limitation being extreme rock hopping rides which I have no interest in anyway)
    I've driven cheap touring and mountain bikes and never a problem in close to 5 decades.

    If anything the less technological alloys seem to be more forgiving of some curb transgressions than the latest lightweight rim benders of the day.

    As for your query "aren't we allowed to have anything nice anymore" of course you are but expenisve bikes being very visible of course elicit theft which was my whole point.

    I don't tend to have expensive things that are highly visible. Its been a sensible approach.

    I avoid theft in this way.
    Aluminum (Cromoloy) doesn't rust, for one thing, which is important if you ride in wet conditions and snow. Ride a nice bike, properly set up, for a day, and if you can't see the difference, then stick with the cheaper bike. Some people just aren't that sensitive to what I find to be significant differences. Like I said, I've had three bikes over the last couple of years. The other two were tanks compared to my TriCross Comp.

    I ride a lot, as do you, and many others on this forum as well. I'd be interested to see how many appreciate a nice bike. There's no problem with cheap bikes at all (I'm looking at getting a vintage "grocery getter"), and the differences may be wasted on some who don't require anything better, but they get stolen too.

    There's never been anything that said bikes were meant to be cheap.

    Personally, given that my bike takes the place of a car, I think $2500 is pretty cheap compared with even entry level cars, and the maintenance, parking, insurance, gas, etc I don't have to pay for makes it the best personal finance decision I've even made.

    Owning the crappiest bike on the block isn't going to solve the problem in any way, but it will make for a far less pleasurable daily commute for me. I love my bike.
    For me I have the benefit of brute force and reasonable physical condition. Really doesn't matter that the bike is a little heavier and absorbs shock less.

    Could care less that theres a little give to the frame and gears as I'm grinding up a hill.
    All it means is I need to work a little which is a large reason I'm ever on the bike in the first place..i.e. I WANT it to be harder. More physical benefit.

    Aside from that with all the arthritis in my knees and aging joints it really doesn't matter what bike I ride as one learns to just tune out any nature of pain and just keep going.

    Most activity for me is painful by now. (but not due to cheap bikes) Riding a good bike would not offer me the same differential benefit it might to somebody that does not always experience pain anyways.

    In short the comfort you feel in a good bike I wouldn't feel anyway. I wouldn't notice the difference.

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    Then you're right not to spend a bunch more money.

    I used to buy two or three bikes at a time from Goodwill for $13 ea. The locks cost more than the bikes. Guess what - they were all stolen. I just didn't care that much.

    The irony is not lost on me that I can spend thousands more to save a few grams of weight, and still have to carry a five pound lock around.

    The best way to avoid having your bike stolen is to secure it properly. I keep my bike in my apartment, in my cubicle at work, and I have a bike locker downtown. I'm paranoid. A lot of bikes get stolen from garages and backyards. If you're going to leave it either place, make certain it's still locked securely. Best to lock it up in a highly visible, well-lit location. And it's always a good idea to use at least two different kinds of locks.

    And I'm working on a remote control exploding bike seat.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 04-07-2009 at 09:30 PM.
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    i wonder if the police have thought of putting some sort of gps tracking device into some target bikes then when they get stolen just follow it to wherever this huge cache of bikes are.

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    The GPS bike systems I've found are all quite expensive (the ones I've seen used by police in other areas are around $1K+ - I don't know why). I know there are cheaper ones, but I don't know why we can't develop real cheap ones if we can put it in a cheap phone.

    I have always had a feeling bike theft isn't taken seriously enough, especially by EPS. I'd like to see a bait bike program set up. They've had them in other cities for years, and in the Netherlands they are trying to put GPS on every bike. I still like my exploding bike seat idea.

    Good suggestion RichardW. Check out BaitBike.com

    Here are some examples:
    Sacramento CA My favourite busted thief stories.

    Minnesota

    Wisconsin

    Victoria "the program was originally introduced in Victoria, B.C., where police credit it with a 19 per cent decrease in bicycle thefts in a six-month period."

    Toronto "Since the pilot Bike Bait program was introduced on Sept. 29, a number of charges have been laid, including four arrests in a single day."
    & The huge bike theft (1500+ bikes) bust in Toronto last year. "Last week, police set up a “bait” bike operation that led them to stolen bicycles at the Bicycle Clinic, as well as at the owner’s residence, and two other storage garages."

    Of course in one case I saw the thieves got between a $200 & $400 fine and no jail time. When they can pay that off with one day's thefts, it's not a deterrent.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 05-07-2009 at 02:30 PM.
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    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) seems like a possible solution. I don't know a thing about this though, but it seems promising. GPS systems are still too big in many cases, and can't be hidden inside of a bike. You can't track the RFID from what I understand, but you can point a scanner at the bike to see details.

    From the stolen bike registry.
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    GPS installed on personal transportation that can be tracked by gov't? Over my dead body. I'd rather deal with my stuff being stolen than have the gov't be able to track my every move.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    GPS installed on personal transportation that can be tracked by gov't? Over my dead body. I'd rather deal with my stuff being stolen than have the gov't be able to track my every move.
    Better get rid of your phone then.

    The GPS stuff I've seen is monitored by a specific device as opposed to general, but I'm no high-tech guru. Not sure why the Government would want to track you, but I'm paranoid too!
    Last edited by Jimbo; 10-07-2009 at 12:33 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    There's no way 1500 bikes a year can just disappear in Edmonton.
    There's about a dozen natives that hang out at a joint by my place and all of them have nice bicycles, and I can say with confidence from their clothing and hygiene that these folks didn't walk into United Cycle and purchase them. Throw in the pile of bikes every week I see bent and wrecked around town as I tour about, and I don't think 1500 stolen bikes a year would be very difficult for those that have no fear of consequences.
    I had my new bike stolen by 3 whites guys...

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    Ouch. Sorry to hear that.

    You saw the guys that did it? Can you describe them very well? 3 guys stole it? I'm curious how three guys steal a bike. Usually it's only one, since it's hard for three guys to take off on one bike. Did they have a vehicle? Were you mugged or something. Do you have a description of the bike, or, even better, a picture you could post?

    If you go to the Edmonton Bike Commuters site, I think there's a stolen bike registry.
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  25. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    Ouch. Sorry to hear that.

    You saw the guys that did it? Can you describe them very well? 3 guys stole it? I'm curious how three guys steal a bike. Usually it's only one, since it's hard for three guys to take off on one bike. Did they have a vehicle? Were you mugged or something. Do you have a description of the bike, or, even better, a picture you could post?

    If you go to the Edmonton Bike Commuters site, I think there's a stolen bike registry.
    3 guys in an old blue pickup truck - license plate starting with either TAM or JAM


    http://s973.photobucket.com/albums/ae218/LostBike/




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    Good job. I hope you get it back.

    I've had a couple of bikes stolen, and one there's no way they could have easily gotten the second lock off. I suspected it had to be a truck.

    These aren't random crimes of opportunity. This is organized crime. Police forces need to get together and get on top of this. I'm certain it involves sending bikes, or parts, to other jurisdictions.

    Good luck. I'll keep my eyes peeled.

    Post to http://edmontonbikes.ca/stolenbikes/ . Of course you should also report it asap. Especially with the description of the truck and dirtbags. I hate bike thieves!

    I sent the pic in an email to United Cycle. I hope you have the serial number and everything.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 24-10-2009 at 10:58 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Well one of the fellows that cleans the lot spent the weekend scouring the downtown area and found the bike abandonned in the brush beside the Shaw. He held the bike for two days to ensure it got back to its' rightful owner.
    Don't wanna poo-poo the story but maybe he stole the bike and then collected the reward for returning it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stolenbikeedm View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    Ouch. Sorry to hear that.

    You saw the guys that did it? Can you describe them very well? 3 guys stole it? I'm curious how three guys steal a bike. Usually it's only one, since it's hard for three guys to take off on one bike. Did they have a vehicle? Were you mugged or something. Do you have a description of the bike, or, even better, a picture you could post?

    If you go to the Edmonton Bike Commuters site, I think there's a stolen bike registry.
    3 guys in an old blue pickup truck - license plate starting with either TAM or JAM


    http://s973.photobucket.com/albums/ae218/LostBike/



    Very similar bike on Kijiji, just different seat. No contact info on post or photo page. Hope you check it out.

    http://edmonton.kijiji.ca/c-buy-and-...dIdZ167981639#

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  29. #29

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    I'm looking to register our bikes on an online database in case they get stolen. However, it seems there are several choices available to Canadians. Any thoughts or experience with these registries? Do the police search them at all or just check their own stolen bike records?


    The one below is recommended by Crime Stoppers:
    https://www.operationhandsoff.com/en/register.php
    Last news item is 2011.


    The one below is recommended by the EBC http://edmontonbikes.ca/services/bike-registry/. but looking at the site there's no noted affiliation with any local organizations.
    https://bikeindex.org
    https://bikeindex.org/where



    Per the following site: "BikeRegistryCanada.com and Bike Shepherd have joined forces to become Canada’s only national bicycle database":
    http://www.bikeshepherd.ca
    Last blog entry is 2013.



    I see that the Toronto Police have their own registry. It would be nice to see our police "borrow" their software and get local shops to register every new bike sold though on second thought, I assume insurance claims support many shops.


    Anyone have some ideas on secretly identifying ones own bikes?

    Or using things like Tiles/Chipolos/etc?

    And with kid's bikes, I imagine bullies or crooked young teens just come along and say the bike is theirs if caught nabbing a bike, so is it possible that any markings could deter that?
    Last edited by KC; 06-08-2016 at 08:38 PM.

  30. #30

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    My solution to bike theft is to drive Costco type bikes (also known as Canadian tire type bikes) that nobody wants to steal. Can lock it up anywhere, leave it as long as I like unattended. Never had a theft.

    My mountain bikes have 18gears, two wheels, and a crank. About all I ever need.

    Should also mention I use a cheap bike lock anybody could cut through with bolt cutters if they wanted to.

    I save money and aggravation and have never come back to a parked bike that isn't there. Have used my most recent mountain bike for at least a dozen years and still doing fine with it.

    Total cost of bike purchase in my lifetime (+50years) and about 5-6 bikes in my life has been less than 2K combined. In that figure was a pretty good touring bike I had back in the day. That's the only bike I ever had to worry about leaving somewhere.
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    Bicycle thefts in the last couple years have apparently gone through the roof.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    My solution to bike theft is to drive Costco type bikes (also known as Canadian tire type bikes) that nobody wants to steal. Can lock it up anywhere, leave it as long as I like unattended. Never had a theft.

    My mountain bikes have 18gears, two wheels, and a crank. About all I ever need.

    Should also mention I use a cheap bike lock anybody could cut through with bolt cutters if they wanted to.

    I save money and aggravation and have never come back to a parked bike that isn't there. Have used my most recent mountain bike for at least a dozen years and still doing fine with it.

    Total cost of bike purchase in my lifetime (+50years) and about 5-6 bikes in my life has been less than 2K combined. In that figure was a pretty good touring bike I had back in the day. That's the only bike I ever had to worry about leaving somewhere.

    Sooo solution buy crap??

    Thats not a solution at all. I have had two bikes stolen over the past decade. One off a 2nd story Balcony, other off my roof rack of my car (left it overnight stupid mistake) But thankfully for the second bike I had insurance.

    Since that one I have never had any stolen. But my current bike definitely isn't cheap so I don't leave it outside anywhere. And well you get what you pay for, there was a video a guy did taking a walmart full suspension bike downhill, it fell apart that day. I will have to dig it up and share. But I sure as hell ain't gonna buy cheap **** as a solution to theft lol.

  33. #33

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    You equate cheap with crap?

    Cheapness often results from production characteristics like economies of scale, minimizing rejects, efficiencies of production, standardization, etc. plus marketability / market share allowing for a lower price made up through greater volume is sales.

    If you look at big box retailers like Home Depot they offer very high "quality" paints and stains for very reasonable prices (price points). The so called "best" paints like Benjamin Moore, having lower market exposure, etc. have to charge significantly more for what is likely marginal quality improvements.
    Last edited by KC; 25-08-2016 at 09:52 AM.

  34. #34

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    In my experience of bikes, yea usually cheap does not equal quality.

    the review I spoke of.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkMnk_eCDQU

    Perhaps an extreme test for said bike, but proves the point of you get what you pay for.

  35. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ponto View Post
    In my experience of bikes, yea usually cheap does not equal quality.

    the review I spoke of.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkMnk_eCDQU

    Perhaps an extreme test for said bike, but proves the point of you get what you pay for.
    You "spoke" of

    Good video. Seems like pretty honest reporting, as he admitted that he likely exceeded its design purpose. So, change out the brake pads and the handle bars and does it stop being crap?
    Last edited by KC; 25-08-2016 at 10:01 AM.

  36. #36

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    Its crazy right now, twice bike thieves have cut through chain link fence at back of my condo and stolen bikes (which haven't been stored in the proper bike storage room, but outside it). I don't know what they do with these bikes, I presume they are taken to another city and sold on kijiji or similar.

    As to the quality of bike issue, I have a $700 Alumninum road bike (specialized sectur), most expensive bike I have ever owned. Its not as good as a $5,000 carbon fiber bike, but to be honest, I don't really care about maybe going 1km/hr faster (probably not even that). The Aluminiun is just as light, only issue is not quite as stiff re power transfer. Before this bike, I had an older steel hybrid which I got for $20 at a garage sale, I didn't notice a big improvement in speeds. I would regret buying current bike, but I think I probably need it as some of the road events I do would have not been open to me with previous bike, as it is mine is typically the cheapest bike there.

    I think if you drop down ridiculous sums on a bike, you probably shouldn't be too shocked when someone goes to ridiculous lengths to steal it. Bike theft is definitely a serious issue right now though, I'd be scared to buy a bike anywhere other than a bike store, as I expect most on second hand market are probably stolen from some poor person somewhere.
    Last edited by moahunter; 25-08-2016 at 10:04 AM.

  37. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ponto View Post
    In my experience of bikes, yea usually cheap does not equal quality.

    the review I spoke of.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkMnk_eCDQU

    Perhaps an extreme test for said bike, but proves the point of you get what you pay for.
    You "spoke" of
    Lol did I miss a joke?

  38. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    Its crazy right now, twice bike thieves have cut through chain link fence at back of my condo and stolen bikes (which haven't been stored in the proper bike storage room, but outside it). I don't know what they do with these bikes, I presume they are taken to another city and sold on kijiji or similar.

    As to the quality of bike issue, I have a $700 Alumninum road bike, most expensive bike I have ever owned. Its not as good as a $5,000 carbon fiber bike, but to be honest, I don't really care about maybe going 1km/hr faster (probably not even that). The Aluminiun is just as light, only issue is not quite as stiff re power transfer. Before this bike, I had an older steel hybrid which I got for $20 at a garage sale, I didn't notice a big improvement in speeds. I think if you drop down ridiculous sums on a bike, you probably shouldn't be too shocked when someone goes to crazy lengths to steal it. Bike theft is definitely a serious issue right now though, I'd be scared to buy a bike anywhere other than a bike store, as I expect most on second hand market are probably stolen from some poor person somewhere.
    Very good points, and with road bikes - they get crazy prices to drop grams of weights, which in reality only matters for those doing races trying to shave off every second possible.

    I've done a few mountain bike races, two 24 hour ones and intend to do more - so having that expensive bike that can take the abuse of the mountains and last me is worth it in my mind. But it stays in my house 100% of the time, or if I take it to work it comes inside the office.

    Sucks that people are suck a holes.

    I know the Police auctions usually have a ton of recovered bikes every year. (not a bad place to try and pick up a nice bike for a decent price)

  39. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ponto View Post
    Very good points, and with road bikes - they get crazy prices to drop grams of weights, which in reality only matters for those doing races trying to shave off every second possible.
    I find it funny when you see a weekend warrior clearly overweight riding a 5k bike, unless you are at something crazy like 6% body fat, there is a lot more to be gained I think by losing weight than spending thousands of dollars Its more about style / status / toys for boys/girls I think, still, better than a jacked up truck I guess.

  40. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ponto View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ponto View Post
    In my experience of bikes, yea usually cheap does not equal quality.

    the review I spoke of.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkMnk_eCDQU

    Perhaps an extreme test for said bike, but proves the point of you get what you pay for.
    You "spoke" of
    Lol did I miss a joke?
    You wheely need to ask that?

  41. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ponto View Post
    Very good points, and with road bikes - they get crazy prices to drop grams of weights, which in reality only matters for those doing races trying to shave off every second possible.
    I find it funny when you see a weekend warrior clearly overweight riding a 5k bike, unless you are at something crazy like 6% body fat, there is a lot more to be gained I think by losing weight than spending thousands of dollars Its more about style / status / toys for boys/girls I think, still, better than a jacked up truck I guess.
    A family member of mine is overweight and is well over 55. He's done two or three or more iron man competitions (or whatever they are called). Rides, runs, swims regularly (and not casual stuff. 20+k runs, 50-100k rides on weekends, swimming across lakes, etc...Owns one of those outrageously costly lightweight bikes (which makes supreme sense for someone overweight compared to someone that is underweight buying a lightweight bike).

    It's funny when people have major misperceptions about other people.


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2IGRzAbCnQ8

    They were asked what their day jobs were. :/)


    Old Men Grooving
    http://oldmengrooving.net/videos/
    Last edited by KC; 25-08-2016 at 10:22 AM.

  42. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    I find it funny when you see a weekend warrior clearly overweight riding a 5k bike, unless you are at something crazy like 6% body fat, there is a lot more to be gained I think by losing weight than spending thousands of dollars Its more about style / status / toys for boys/girls I think, still, better than a jacked up truck I guess.
    haha this is true - I learned from last years 24hr race to this years 24hr race that the right bike does matter though. I went from more of an a downhill all mountain bike, to much more of a x-country all mountain bike. That coupled with different training and dropping about 10lbs of weight (more cardio less weights) I managed to shave 30 minutes off my 2hr lap time down to 1:34 and that was in the mud an rain.

    A lot cheaper to drop 5lbs of fat than 5 lbs of bike haha.

    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ponto View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ponto View Post
    In my experience of bikes, yea usually cheap does not equal quality.

    the review I spoke of.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkMnk_eCDQU

    Perhaps an extreme test for said bike, but proves the point of you get what you pay for.
    You "spoke" of
    Lol did I miss a joke?
    You wheely need to ask that?
    Damn I need stronger coffee.

  43. #43

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    ^biggest things that have helped me is getting clipless pedals, and riding more. I think a stiffer road bike would give me a little more speed, but not really any significant improvement (I read that top road bikers can actually put up very good times on Aluminum bikes), only way I will get improvement is by biking a lot more, which is a commitment I'm not really ready for I've noticed a lot of heavier people are a lot faster than me, stronger legs and better cardio are the reasons though, and they got that from biking more, or natural ability, not spending more. Nice little article on it here:

    http://www.over40cyclist.com/carbon-...luminum-bikes/
    Last edited by moahunter; 25-08-2016 at 10:27 AM.

  44. #44

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    Clipless is one of the greatest inventions ever... minus when I go to fast downhill and bail, but at that point you gotta commit 100% lol.

    Aluminum bikes are actually really good - friend of mine bought a steel one due its added stiffness instead of worrying about weight.

  45. #45

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    One day I'll convert from flatties to clipless. My biking friends keep pushing me to do it, telling me it will make a vast improvement in my climbing abilities, but for the most part, I have no issues keeping up to them on long climbs (there are no long climbs in Edmonton btw). I have the same fear going clipless - the bail factor. You can't as easily just put your foot out and dab to save you from crashing...

  46. #46

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    ^I was worried about it as well, but they actually come out pretty easily, especially in a panic type situation. But crashing is less of a concern on a road bike, than a mountain bike, if you hit bike wheel in front re drafting, it won't matter if you have clipless pedals or not, there wont be time and its gonna hurt. I'd probably be a bit more nervous going down a hill on them on a MTB, might be worth exploring hybrid clipless, which you could put in for going uphill, then spin them over and ride as normal pedal downhill (shoe cleat might be a bit annoying then though downhill, but probably not a big deal).

    https://www.amazon.ca/Shimano-PD-M32.../dp/B001AT33CW
    Last edited by moahunter; 25-08-2016 at 11:10 AM.

  47. #47

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    It takes some practice, once you are used to them you can unclip pretty quickly. I have managed to get my feet out for most bails. Only one time i went over my bars and I ended up on the ground upside down with my bike on top of me haha.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Good video. Seems like pretty honest reporting, as he admitted that he likely exceeded its design purpose. So, change out the brake pads and the handle bars and does it stop being crap?
    No. That bike would continue to fall apart in pretty much every way imaginable. A proper downhill bike starts at 2-3k and it goes up from there. Top end ones are 10-15k, which admittedly is ridiculous. Trying to ride double black runs on that bike was damn near suicidal. But it does make for a good video. The abuse that downhill bikes are subjected to is incredible. I agree that for a commuter or road bike you don't need to spend a ridiculous amount of money to get a decent bike. But for downhill, enduro, or trail riding you are literally risking life and limb riding a cheap bike. Downhill especially. First person cam views don't really do the terrain that he was tackling justice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards
    One day I'll convert from flatties to clipless. My biking friends keep pushing me to do it, telling me it will make a vast improvement in my climbing abilities, but for the most part, I have no issues keeping up to them on long climbs (there are no long climbs in Edmonton btw). I have the same fear going clipless - the bail factor. You can't as easily just put your foot out and dab to save you from crashing...


    I don't think it makes nearly as much of a difference in pedaling efficiency as people claim. I finally put some clipless on my trail bike this year, and I didn't notice a huge difference. You do get a lot more control over your bike being clipped in though. I didn't find the adjustment too bad. I had mine set at the easiest dis-engagement setting, and my feet come off very easily. First ride I fell over once, but after that I was fine. They did become a bit of a pain at 24 HOA this year though, as they were getting so packed with mud. Pretty sure they've actually done scientific studies on pedal stroke efficiency and found that it's actually no more efficient to "pull" up on your pedal stroke.

    I do scratch my head when I see guys riding at Whistler and Silverstar with clipless though. That just seems crazy to me. XC/Trail? Sure! Enduro? Meh. Downhill? Are you out of your mind?

  49. #49

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    Hard tail mountain bikes can be good quality at around $1000, but won't have the real downhill forks. Still you can do anything that most people will do on it. Full suspension on a bike that costs less than $1500 will be worse than the comparably priced hardtail.
    There can only be one.

  50. #50

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    My rule of thumb is generally $1,000 for a good hard tail (which are awesome for a majority of Edmonton trails and a lot of XC)

    Then full suspension minimum $2,000 - better off to get one with a little less travel and better components than one with a ton of travel and **** components.

  51. #51

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    Full suspension with remote lockoffs is boss. Being able to switch from trails/ascent/descent modes was a big selling feature to me on my latest bike.

  52. #52

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    The new suspension tech these last few years has been fantastic. Love it compared to my 2011 Reign.

  53. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ponto View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    My solution to bike theft is to drive Costco type bikes (also known as Canadian tire type bikes) that nobody wants to steal. Can lock it up anywhere, leave it as long as I like unattended. Never had a theft.

    My mountain bikes have 18gears, two wheels, and a crank. About all I ever need.

    Should also mention I use a cheap bike lock anybody could cut through with bolt cutters if they wanted to.

    I save money and aggravation and have never come back to a parked bike that isn't there. Have used my most recent mountain bike for at least a dozen years and still doing fine with it.

    Total cost of bike purchase in my lifetime (+50years) and about 5-6 bikes in my life has been less than 2K combined. In that figure was a pretty good touring bike I had back in the day. That's the only bike I ever had to worry about leaving somewhere.

    Sooo solution buy crap??

    Thats not a solution at all. I have had two bikes stolen over the past decade. One off a 2nd story Balcony, other off my roof rack of my car (left it overnight stupid mistake) But thankfully for the second bike I had insurance.

    Since that one I have never had any stolen. But my current bike definitely isn't cheap so I don't leave it outside anywhere. And well you get what you pay for, there was a video a guy did taking a walmart full suspension bike downhill, it fell apart that day. I will have to dig it up and share. But I sure as hell ain't gonna buy cheap **** as a solution to theft lol.
    Not crap, the bike has lasted over a dozen years, more than you can get out o 90% of vehicles, and has considerable mileage. Only thing that's worn out is the tires. Still on original brake pads because I anticipate stopping and don't abuse them. I should mention I'm not into any extreme mountain biking like in the video. Obviously if that's your gig then a better mountain bike is necessary but theres nothing crap about a bike that has gone around the planet in mileage and is still standing and in almost perfect working order. I use the bike within its capability and within that capability its fine.. A bike is just transportation/exercise/recreation to me. I take it on asphalt, I take it on reasonable trails. I don't do hardcore trail riding like in the video.

    So what to you is crap to me is the best and most reliable transportation I've ever had. Best 289bucks I ever spent. Costco bike btw. Circa around millennium.
    Last edited by Replacement; 25-08-2016 at 12:45 PM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  54. #54

  55. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Good video. Seems like pretty honest reporting, as he admitted that he likely exceeded its design purpose. So, change out the brake pads and the handle bars and does it stop being crap?
    No. That bike would continue to fall apart in pretty much every way imaginable. A proper downhill bike starts at 2-3k and it goes up from there. Top end ones are 10-15k, which admittedly is ridiculous. Trying to ride double black runs on that bike was damn near suicidal. But it does make for a good video. The abuse that downhill bikes are subjected to is incredible. I agree that for a commuter or road bike you don't need to spend a ridiculous amount of money to get a decent bike. But for downhill, enduro, or trail riding you are literally risking life and limb riding a cheap bike. Downhill especially. First person cam views don't really do the terrain that he was tackling justice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards
    One day I'll convert from flatties to clipless. My biking friends keep pushing me to do it, telling me it will make a vast improvement in my climbing abilities, but for the most part, I have no issues keeping up to them on long climbs (there are no long climbs in Edmonton btw). I have the same fear going clipless - the bail factor. You can't as easily just put your foot out and dab to save you from crashing...


    I don't think it makes nearly as much of a difference in pedaling efficiency as people claim. I finally put some clipless on my trail bike this year, and I didn't notice a huge difference. You do get a lot more control over your bike being clipped in though. I didn't find the adjustment too bad. I had mine set at the easiest dis-engagement setting, and my feet come off very easily. First ride I fell over once, but after that I was fine. They did become a bit of a pain at 24 HOA this year though, as they were getting so packed with mud. Pretty sure they've actually done scientific studies on pedal stroke efficiency and found that it's actually no more efficient to "pull" up on your pedal stroke.

    I do scratch my head when I see guys riding at Whistler and Silverstar with clipless though. That just seems crazy to me. XC/Trail? Sure! Enduro? Meh. Downhill? Are you out of your mind?
    Jimbo several times has tried to convince me how much benefit he gets from Clipless pedals. As Medwards states you can keep up on hills without them, provided a cyclist is good on hills. I used to be. i'm over the hill a bit, (cycling pun).

    I wonder whether clipless make more of a difference for people that might have differential leg strength from other sports. This can happen to some people, and so that they do not exert the same force on crank with either foot which could throw off torque a bit. Others I've cycle with are just clumsy, or through injury, clank their crank a fair bit. (wherein force is not always equally applied to crank at all points in the rotation, its annoying when you hear it but it happens to some cyclists a lot) With proper crank rotation and consistent leg strength I can't see how there would be much difference. It would make sense to use clipless if you had one pedal, lol. But a two pedal is like two pistons with the downstroke and upstroke being simultaneous and providing continual consistent rotation of the crank, ideally, with very little variation.
    Last edited by Replacement; 25-08-2016 at 12:48 PM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  56. #56
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    We've had a ton of bikes stolen in Strathcona. Most were in garages, and I know one was locked to a stud in the garage - the thieves just cut the stud. There's definitely some kind of professional bike ring operating in the area, as other items of value are left behind.
    They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

  57. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Jimbo several times has tried to convince me how much benefit he gets from Clipless pedals. As Medwards states you can keep up on hills without them, provided a cyclist is good on hills. I used to be. i'm over the hill a bit, (cycling pun).
    On the road bike, I have found clipless a lot more comfortable than the old straps I used to have. It just feels nice to have your feet "connected" always to the pedals, and I do find it easier up hill. Some of that's probably mental, if I had a perfect stroke I guess it wouldn't matter that much, but I do find it makes me think about engaging the hamstrings to pull up when climbing, which is just a good variation on a long ride from always using quads. Maybe its not technically more efficient, but I think it does give your legs some variation and work some different muscles, which is good when your quads burn out. A bit like what this person is saying:

    In terms of clipless efficiency; I feel the benefit doesn’t manifest as immediate, raw power transfer but, given the perception of connectivity, you are more likely to focus on a circular pedaling action, which helps keep constant cadence and a higher overall speed.

    Clipless efficiency comes into play more when you are fatigued and need to recruit other muscle groups (hams and calves) to help pedal. Also, when standing, as you pump the opposing forces of core/obliques and handlebar pressure to drive power into your pedals, being clipped in helps stabilize that motion (especially when tired).
    http://www.tetongravity.com/story/su...lipless-pedals

    And, if nothing else, its a pretty cheap upgrade to try. I got some shimano road bike clipless for about 40, and purchased a shimano shoe for 100 at MEC. I don't think bike tech gets much cheaper than that (and we all need shoes anyway). Clipless is a no brainer for road bikes (there is no real downside), I wish I had got them sooner. I think if I switched to MTB I would use just because I am used to them now and really enjoy the feel, but I can understand why its debated because risk of falling/crashing is much greater.
    Last edited by moahunter; 25-08-2016 at 05:01 PM.

  58. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gord Lacey View Post
    We've had a ton of bikes stolen in Strathcona. Most were in garages, and I know one was locked to a stud in the garage - the thieves just cut the stud. There's definitely some kind of professional bike ring operating in the area, as other items of value are left behind.
    It's happening all over the city. My bikes are in my locked garage, locked to each other, and locked to a bolt in the cement pad of the garage. Still don't feel it's enough. I have special insurance on my bikes, just in case.

  59. #59
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    Only place my bikes are left unattended is in my condo or office. And at Whistler when I'm grabbing lunch while downhilling. My DH rig is worth about a quarter of what the bikes beside it are, so typically I don't worry about it too much. Although I'll try to keep it within view at Longhorn's or GLC.
    Last edited by Marcel Petrin; 25-08-2016 at 05:41 PM.

  60. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gord Lacey View Post
    We've had a ton of bikes stolen in Strathcona. Most were in garages, and I know one was locked to a stud in the garage - the thieves just cut the stud. There's definitely some kind of professional bike ring operating in the area, as other items of value are left behind.
    It's happening all over the city. My bikes are in my locked garage, locked to each other, and locked to a bolt in the cement pad of the garage. Still don't feel it's enough. I have special insurance on my bikes, just in case.
    I still think this all means that a great tracking invention sits undiscovered or uninvented so far.

    Or, as I believe I posted earlier, stick a Chipolo or Tile on it somewhere in the hopes you can find the bike before they find the chip.


    Or spray paint it some awful colours.

  61. #61
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    KC, yeah, I wonder why there isn't a good bike tracking device. I've looked into dog tracking devices before, and they seemed reasonably-priced (you could pay per "ping" to a GPS), so it's weird that there isn't a GPS bike tracker... or maybe there is and we just don't know about it.
    They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

  62. #62

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    To bad they did not make bicycle frames with glow in the dark paint. Paint them trendy colors that glows when it gets dark. After the coats of trendy colors have been painted on a person could get their name put on the frame then a coat or two of transparent paint put on top of the name. Glow in the dark and also your name will show up. The name and transparent paint can be done after the bike is bought. Added bonus of safety riding at night.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  63. #63

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    Bike theft in Vancouver drops 30% thanks to new app. Will other Canadian cities catch on? | Globalnews.ca

    https://globalnews.ca/news/3847638/b...ct-529-garage/

  64. #64
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    This is a HUGE issue here.
    www.decl.org

    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

  65. #65

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    Bigger than Huge... YUGE issue.

    Many friends have had their bikes stolen. Most of them didn't take proper steps to secure them, thinking inside a garage would be enough. Thieves will break into your car, steal your garage door opener, or break a window, or kick open the door, and your bike is gone.

    And regular house insurance will only cover the first 1000 after editable. Many bikes are worth 3-6k, and are being sold for a hundred or two.

    Sad...

    I personally keep my bikes locked to each other, and to a bolt in the my garage pad, and make sure to keep my garage door opener with me if I'm leaving my truck on the road. I also leave my cheap bike unlocked. You can have that one, just leave the others alone! (yes plural)

  66. #66

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    Garage security:

    You could also put a motion detector light switch or separate motion detector security flood light in the garage to light it right up if anyone enters - though it might just help them in their shopping. I’ve considered getting an external light similarly wired in so if anyone entered the garage at night, it would be very obvious.



    FYI:

    The 6 Second Garage Door Break-In You Can Prevent - YouTube
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kSO_HTBHLFI


    Chain comments are interesting
    How to Stop Thieves | Family Handyman
    https://www.familyhandyman.com/home-...p-thieves/amp/
    Last edited by KC; 15-11-2017 at 08:41 PM.

  67. #67
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    Honestly, KC, the motion lights don't really work to deter people. They're checking things out at 3, 4, 5 in the morning, when no one is even up to see a light go on. I know of 3 instances where our motion lights in the back yard came on, and people still poked around. I caught a guy on camera about 2 months ago, and after the garage light went on he still approached the house and looked on our porch for anything to grab (nothing there, fool!), and set off another light in doing so.

    If you REALLY want to know if someone is in the back yard, get one of these:
    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B007HKOKXE

    It's meant for an acreage so you know when someone is coming up your driveway. The brown box runs off batteries (mine have been in 2 years already), and transmits to the black box in the house that beeps any time there's motion. Put it in the garage, or alongside the back gate and it'll beep in the house whenever there's motion. Since it plugs into the wall you can also have it on a timer so it only beeps during certain times (10pm-6am, for example). This is extremely easy to install, costs under $100, and can be moved to a different location if you need to (you can also buy a second one and monitor two different areas if you want).
    They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

  68. #68
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    Crawford Plains, Millwoods since 1985
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    2,713

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    I remember asking my dad when I was about 18 that maybe a motion light was needed in the back alley and he promptly retorted "Why, so they can see what they're doing as they're thieving?"

    We never got a motion light.
    Time spent in the Rockies is never deducted from the rest of your life

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