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Thread: 3D Printing

  1. #1

    Default 3D Printing (on TED)

    On TED... something I've been following for a while now. ...and something for Edmonton's entrepreneurs to jump on. In our economy creative minds should finds loads of applications...

    http://www.ted.com/talks/lisa_haroun...m_medium=email


    I also started this thread (see below). Advances like 3D printing fall into my view of my ideal economy. Low grade tasks of simply exporting logs and bitumen so other countries create the infrastructure, schools and educated workforce to take advantage of the upgrading goes against my belief that Alberta should create a diversified economy that also works on our known potential strengths. Moreover, places like Texas may have a temporary advantage of having old lower cost infrastructure to utilize (sometimes to re-export the resulting products) but we could be creating leading edge, more efficient and profitable infrastructure geared to the future.

    Your ideal economy
    http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/forum...ad.php?t=22865
    Last edited by KC; 27-01-2012 at 02:59 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    On TED... something I've been following for a while now. ...and something for Edmotnon's entrepreneurs to jump on. In our economy creative minds should finds loads of applications...

    http://www.ted.com/talks/lisa_haroun...m_medium=email


    I also started this thread (see below). Advances like 3D printing fall into my view of my ideal economy. Low grade tasks of simply exporting logs and bitumen so other countries create the infrastructure, schools and educated workforce to take advantage of the upgrading goes against my belief that Alberta should create a diversified economy that also works on our known potential strengths. Moreover, places like Texas may have a temporary advantage of having old lower cost infrastructure to utilize (sometimes to re-export the resulting products) but we could be creating leading edge, more efficient and profitable infrastructure geared to the future.

    Your ideal economy
    http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/forum...ad.php?t=22865
    we've been using 3d printing for years and years now. We have our own printers in company, but anyone can go online to a rapid prototyping company, email them a CAD file and get a prototype in any colour within about 36 hours. The printers aren't very expensive for the basic ones. There are a few companies in town that offer this service. There are also ones that can 'print' in metals. I believe it uses a laser to sinter metal powders.

  3. #3

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    Cool!!

    When I'd heard that low cost printers had come available I'd toyed with the idea of buying one myself - but that would just lead to one more successfully started but unfinished project on my slate.

    The printers sure seem like the ideal tool for someone with an idea, modification or even an invention to test out and perfect their concept.

  4. #4
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    ^ Well, I guess those 'perfecters of concept' types went as far as they could before the gov't brought out these new plastic $100 bills.
    Nisi Dominus Frustra

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    nob. are you using them for engineer prototyping or what ?
    Still waiting for the Arlington site to be reborn .......

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueline View Post
    nob. are you using them for engineer prototyping or what ?
    yes, we use the plastic ones for prototyping, but mainly for building displays for tradeshows, giveaways. Much faster, easier, lighter and cheaper to make plastic copies than the real steel thing.

    The metal 3D printers are much cooler. You can make metal parts that would not be machinable in real life (hidden cavities and channels in solid parts, etc). Plus complex geometries and surfaces that would take a lot of machining otherwise (with great tolerances).

    The university has several of the rapid prototype machines for student design project use. I believe the Mechanical engineering department has some as well as the industrial design group.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by nobleea View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Blueline View Post
    nob. are you using them for engineer prototyping or what ?
    yes, we use the plastic ones for prototyping, but mainly for building displays for tradeshows, giveaways. Much faster, easier, lighter and cheaper to make plastic copies than the real steel thing.

    The metal 3D printers are much cooler. You can make metal parts that would not be machinable in real life (hidden cavities and channels in solid parts, etc). Plus complex geometries and surfaces that would take a lot of machining otherwise (with great tolerances).

    The university has several of the rapid prototype machines for student design project use. I believe the Mechanical engineering department has some as well as the industrial design group.
    Yeah, when I first read about them I thought; "This is SOOO Cool!!! Like in 1994 when I discovered the internet!"

    A game changer in many ways - especially for little guys wanting to change the world.

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    My son (age 22) built himself a 3-D printer from plans off the internet. He ordered some parts off the internet and got some locally. By the time he finished it (just before Christmas 2011) some parts already needed to be upgraded and he was able to print the new versions. It's very cool - almost hypnotic to watch it building up the object.

  9. #9

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    Only a few years old - are any Edmonton companies looking to get into making these?



    Bre Pettis: 3D Printing's First Celebrity



    http://www.businessweek.com/articles...irst-celebrity

    "Founded in 2009, MakerBot used to specialize in selling hobbyist 3D printer kits..."

    "During my visit, Pettis, a former school teacher, douses my hair with cornstarch and then uses a laser to make a 3D scan of my head. ..."


    "Pettis boasts about bringing some manufacturing chops back to Brooklyn. “These streets used to be lined with manufacturing companies,” he says. “Show me another one now besides us.” Fair enough. But Pettis does not exactly ooze “titan of industry.” “We like what we are doing and are having a good time,” he says. “We treat our customers as our friends. They are the coolest people in the world, and we’re supporting them being creative.” Meanwhile, the manufacturing floor at the BotCave seems more reminiscent of a college dorm room than a Toyota production line, with its ..."

    Source: Bre Pettis: 3D Printing's First Celebrity, by Ashlee Vance, May 09, 2012, Bloomberg Businessweek


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    U of A has been doing research into 3D printing for years a former co-worker of mine is now there. As well they do have 3D printing services
    http://www.aict.ualberta.ca/units/research/3d-printing

  11. #11
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    There was an article on popular science talking about a 3D printed working gun. I now its not really appropriate but it is a big advance in 3D printing.

    Does any one in the area actually have a hobby 3D printer? would be fun to learn more about them.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by sundance View Post
    U of A has been doing research into 3D printing for years a former co-worker of mine is now there. As well they do have 3D printing services
    http://www.aict.ualberta.ca/units/research/3d-printing
    That's excellent news! Do they have a manufacturing interest or patents? How much revenue are they generating! i.e. Since they were in early how much of the market have they captured? Will they be spinning off a company into Alberta's economy?


    3D Printing Market Forecasted For Explosive Growth To 8.4 Billion By 2020 - HotHardware

    "According to a report from MarketsandMarkets, the 3D printing industry is poised for huge growth in the next several years. By 2020, the industry should hit upwards of $8.4 billion, with a compound annual growth rate of a healthy 23%. "

    http://hothardware.com/News/3D-Print...llion-By-2020/




    Since I started this thread, 3D Systems a NASDQ traded stock, is up close to 800%. Similarly for a few others, so I imagine the UofA's stake in the technology is also taking off!!! Most excellent! The entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well in Edmonton!!!




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    Last edited by KC; 22-12-2013 at 07:50 AM.

  13. #13

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    The article mentions how the US has already taken the lead. If 3D printing has been in our own backyard for years, why...

    3D printer boom lures new wave of Japan entrepreneurs
    BY STANLEY WHITE
    TOKYO Mon Dec 2, 2013

    "Whether these entrepreneurs can lay the foundations for a new era in Japanese products though may depend on whether Abe can tear down barriers in a wider business culture that shuns risk and supports the status quo."

    ...
    "Japan needs a more fluid labor market, where people can quit a major company, start their own and get re-hired somewhere else if they fail," Obayashi, who spent 26 years at camera-and-printer-maker Canon Inc before starting her 3D printer business Smilelink last year.

    "A lot of Japanese people think entrepreneurs are strange, but they are good for the economy."
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...9B10UX20131202



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    Last edited by KC; 23-12-2013 at 09:01 AM.

  14. #14

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    Not printing but interesting. Sooo... it’s a “volumetric” or 3D display as opposed to what we call 3D displays which really aren’t 3D?

    Soooo.... is this semantic-situation like when colour photography replaced the old colour photos (like postcards) that were really colourized black and white photos?

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0124151154.htm

    “..."We refer to this colloquially as the Princess Leia project," Smalley said. "Our group has a mission to take the 3D displays of science fiction and make them real. We have created a display that can do that."

    ...
    “First things, first, Smalley says. The image of Princess Leia is not what people think it is: It's not a hologram. A 3D image that floats in air, that you can walk all around and see from every angle, is actually called a volumetric image. Examples of volumetric images include the 3D displays Tony Stark interacts with in Ironman or the massive image-projecting table in Avatar.

    A holographic display scatters light only at a 2D surface. If you aren't looking at that surface you won't see the 3D image because you must be looking at the scattering surface to see the image. A volumetric display has little scattering surfaces scattered throughout a 3D space -- the same space occupied by the 3D image -- so if you are looking at the image you're are also looking at the scatters. For this reason, a volumetric image can be seen from any angle.”
    Last edited by KC; 29-01-2018 at 06:31 AM.

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