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Thread: The Edmonton CFC refrigeration

  1. #1

    Default The Edmonton CFC refrigeration

    CFC - CANADIAN FREE COLD

    Let's design a cheap, simple cold air intake for refrigerators to offset electricity usage and take advantage of our climate.

    So, as I've mentioned elsewhere... run a couple tubes ( one or both insulated as needed ) to one's refrigeration unit either under the 'fridge'/cooler or right up through the ceiling (i.e. in bungalows) and stick an insulated plate on the fridge (probably on top) to chill it.

    When simple convection wouldn't draw in cold, then something like a computer fan could move the air through the tubes... and/or a mini whirlybird.


    How would this work? What improvements?




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    Last edited by KC; 07-02-2012 at 07:09 AM.

  2. #2

    Default

    While out of the box green thinking is always a good idea, I don't foresee a viable amount of energy to be saved with this.

    Most of the heat dispersed by your fridge is used in your home to keep it warm, reducing load on the furnace. With efficiencies ever increasing in appliances this option become less viable.

    If you are looking for a big energy stealer in the winter months look at your clothes dryer - exhausting warm air and drawing in huge volumes of cold air to make up for this exhaust. Yes some people do just vent to the house but the excess humidty can cause mold and the lint can be a fire hazard.

  3. #3
    I'd rather C2E than work!
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    Default

    While the waste heat from a fridge isn't really wasted for 8 months of the year, electricity is substantially more expensive than natural gas. Remember that most electrical generation in Alberta is mostly coal fired and not much more than 40% efficient, while a furnace burns natural gas and is between 60 and 98% efficient.

    There is also the 4 months of summer when that waste heat is either reducing the comfort level of your house or costing you energy to pump it outside. A solution to both problems could be to move the condenser outside. In the summer, all the waste heat goes outside instead of into your kitchen, while in the winter the lower condenser temperature reduces the pressure that the compressor needs to pump against, which should lower power consumption.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by JJMorrocco View Post
    While out of the box green thinking is always a good idea, I don't foresee a viable amount of energy to be saved with this.

    Most of the heat dispersed by your fridge is used in your home to keep it warm, reducing load on the furnace. With efficiencies ever increasing in appliances this option become less viable.

    If you are looking for a big energy stealer in the winter months look at your clothes dryer - exhausting warm air and drawing in huge volumes of cold air to make up for this exhaust. Yes some people do just vent to the house but the excess humidty can cause mold and the lint can be a fire hazard.
    Like CF bulbs... Misdirected policy eh. Incandescent bulbs heat the rooms we use, why CFs cause our furnace to run more, heating an entire house. It's a tough call when one thinks through to the second nd third order consequences.

    Good point on the dryer.

  5. #5

    Default

    Since we'll all eventually be shifting off natural gas to solar or wind or something electric heat, the idea above is dead in the water.

    However, there's this - which might mean lower solar storage needs.


    Ice blocks make fridges less 'stupid'

    27 May 2016 Last updated at 21:22 BST
    A factory in Wales is producing prototype fridges that could use less electricity than conventional models.

    Its coolers freeze large blocks of ice during the night, when some energy providers charge less for electricity, and use this to keep food cold during the day.

    A version of the fridge designed for storing vaccinations can stay cold for two weeks, reports the BBC's Roger Harrabin.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36397679

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