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Thread: How to get people to drink local beer

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    Default How to get people to drink local beer

    Quote Originally Posted by IanO View Post
    When I spoke with the owner of Amber's, he mentioned the prohibitive environment for microbrews due to the big guys not playing nice.

    But more to that, he said Edmonton simply does not support independent beers very well at all.... and i quote 'Because it is from Edmonton, many think it is subpar or not good enough' and simply don't buy it.
    I think what's needed is marketing and more marketing.
    The media can play a role too. They review wines, why not review local brews?
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Jim from Amber's comments are bang on!

    It doesn't matter how often I offer his range of product at my house, so many people just say "I'll have a Canadian or a Bud instead" In their minds a Sleeman's honey brown is a "craft brew"!

    I still keep on trying to get friends and family to try - the strange local stuff!!

    Marketing is needed, but it's not really affordable for a lot of small 3 or 4 man operations>

    The best we as consumers can do is ask for local product wherever we are and better yet ask for it by name!
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    ^ Just stock the local stuff.. free beer is free beer.

    its how I get people to try Amber's.
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    That's mostly what I do, then they bring out there 24 of #@^(&!!
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    I try to buy craft when possible, but I know for a fact the big guys made it incredibly hard for bars to stock local/other.
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    Exposure is definitely a problem. I don't blame Big Beer like Inbev as much as I blame operators for not having the guts to consider alternatives in lieu.

    That said, the few local microbrews I've tried weren't very good, so maybe quality is a secondary problem. Good beer gets around.
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    Then they were never gonna drink it even if you got them to try it....
    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmontonfan View Post
    That's mostly what I do, then they bring out there 24 of #@^(&!!
    are you saying they didn't like it - or would not try it - lol

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    One of the biggest issues is that a lot of people, with anything, prefer certainty. You know when you drink Canadian that you will get a Canadian taste (blah). Why are McDonalds, Boston Pizza etc. so popular.

    A big part of it though is for US TO ASK FOR IT. When you get a beer, ask them why they do not have locals on their tap. Ask for the manager even. When they do have it, let them know that it is a very good thing.
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    They were selling Yellowhead at the Taste of Edmonton beer tent. The other 2 should follow suit.

    Would TV ads help? That Uptown Girl Beer ad out of Calgary looks low budget enough, so surely a local could do better than that?
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Too costly... they just need to get out to more events, tastings and smaller scale stuff.
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    Whenever I bring beer over to a friend's house, I try to bring a local brew. (Amber's Australian Mountain Pepperberry seems to be a popular choice.) Raising awareness starts with your friends, I think!

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    Like at farmers markets!!! Perfect venue as the customers already understand the local focus... where is the outdoor beer area at the DT farmers market?!

    sigh.
    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

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    ^ I can stand the pepperberry... just my personal taste.
    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

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    It is really no different than when eating out, shopping etc.

    How many people go to junction burger, culina, blue plate, dadeos etc. versus Oliver Garden/Boston Pizza/Timmies.

    Who here shops at colorblind, bamboo, red ribbon versus Club, A&F, GAP etc.
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    Quote Originally Posted by edmonton daily photo View Post
    Like at farmers markets!!! Perfect venue as the customers already understand the local focus... where is the outdoor beer area at the DT farmers market?!

    sigh.
    The Mercer Tavern wants to have a small patio beer garden during market as Lit is going to have a wine area this year apparently.
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    Yep.. and we forget that people who are raised on the oliver garden type experience have a certain expectation for their food to be Bland/taseless and often cant handle things like the taste of fresh veggies.. its just to foreign to them.

    Don't expect someone raised on chicken nuggets to all of a sudden appreciate food. You are fighting peoples addiction to salt and sugar as well... but that is apart from the beer talk.
    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

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    Booths at the downtown and Old Strathcona Farmers markets are great ideas.
    We also need more beer stores like the Sherbrooke.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    We have tons of local events, we just need to creatively marry the beer to the events.

    At one time Kokanee was a small local brew , they sponsored a lot of local beer league teams in small BC towns . They threw in a couple of trophies and asked that people call for a kokanee at the bar etc.

    I cant see why that kind of strategy cant work with an Edmonton twist ie . Involvement at the fringe , kalieideo etc.

    I second the motion also about more stores like sherbrooke. There is hope here as they also manage a smaller store across from the mayfield inn. I hope this is a prototype for other locations.

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    Or how about... At a local winter event with a polar bar, we require local brew rather than bud. But alas...
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    One of the better beer blogs around town: http://www.onbeer.org/about/
    Jason Foster also has a regular column on Radio Active and in VUE. He often discusses local beers and is a tireless promoter of local beer scenes around the country.

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    How? Easy... Have it available. Make it cheaper than everything else

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    Cheap means shop at walmart, value... Taste... Quality
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    Quote Originally Posted by DTrobotnik View Post
    How? Easy... Have it available. Make it cheaper than everything else
    Cheaper than everything else means Lucky 7 or Boxer Beer. Not exactly premium beers.

    It's not that easy when the small independents have to compete with multinational conglomerates. No different than McDonald's being able to market a 49 cent cheeseburger.

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    ^ I've never tried those brands. So just what is missing (apart from, presumably, taste) in these cheaper beers?
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanO View Post
    I try to buy craft when possible, but I know for a fact the big guys made it incredibly hard for bars to stock local/other.
    Indeed. I know of a bar that had draws for Oilers jerseys and Oilers tickets during televised Oilers games. A Molson's rep saw the roadside sign advertising the contest.

    He told the bar owner that since Molsons is a major sponsor of the Oilers, any promotion linked to the Oilers/NHL has to have Molsons approval. In other words if a lounge wants to give out an Eberle jersey after the game (even if the owner paid for it), it has to acknowledge Molsons and sell their product in the bar.

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    As a manager in food and beverage, I will say this. Service sucked when dealing with local brewers.

    The "big" Alberta brewer "rocks" in the service department, so they got most of my taps but the local guys? Nope. Never saw them, never heard from them, so they came off the taps. Simple.

    Nothing to do with quality, or taste, or perception. Service. Pure and simple.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    That said, the few local microbrews I've tried weren't very good, so maybe quality is a secondary problem.
    This is the biggest problem. I have had 2 or 3 bad experiences with local beer, which makes me hesitate trying more. If I am paying $6 for a pint or $12 for a six pack, it better be drinkable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RatSOHC View Post
    As a manager in food and beverage, I will say this. Service sucked when dealing with local brewers.

    The "big" Alberta brewer "rocks" in the service department, so they got most of my taps but the local guys? Nope. Never saw them, never heard from them, so they came off the taps. Simple.

    Nothing to do with quality, or taste, or perception. Service. Pure and simple.
    I can appreciate that concern... see Maverick Beer for a good story on supply/consistency issues.
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    I stopped into Vinomania to buy a bottle of wine and decided to check out their beer selection. They definitely carry Amber and Alley Kat. Yellowhead is sold in individual bottles, which I found odd.

    My first stop was going to be deVine but they closed by the time I got there.
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    I've never seen Yellowhead sold in anything BUT individual bottles...

    And DeVine's hours are super annoying, IMO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    Exposure is definitely a problem. I don't blame Big Beer like Inbev as much as I blame operators for not having the guts to consider alternatives in lieu.

    That said, the few local microbrews I've tried weren't very good, so maybe quality is a secondary problem. Good beer gets around.
    This for me as well.

    If you want to get market share bottle a good product. I often find that the same local microbrew that people go on and on about tastes like swill after its bottled.

    I can buy any number International beers that I like and I find the quality to be quite predictable and consistently satisfying. Alternately I find with the local microbrew products its very inconsistent and especially the bottled product. Really hit and miss experience that I tend not to repeat too often.

    It seems odd that brews could travel all the way around the world and end up here in good shape. But that microbrews can't deliver the same standards of quality bottled product. Thats outright fail.

    I simply won't drink beer I don't enjoy just to support a local.

    Finally, I find that local microbrews try to get by on having really odd brews. Yeah I could care less about something called Raspberry pepper plum ale. That kind of marketing and product line is obscure for a reason and with very few customers for a reason. Which will only remain the case.

    Brew good quality beer with 100% less gimmicks that appeals to a larger audience. Its not rocket science.
    Last edited by Replacement; 06-04-2012 at 09:30 PM.
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    I've been an all-grain homebrewer for decades. The main reason for pursuing the hobby was due to living overseas and tasting such fantastic beers and ales, when we moved back in the early 2000's the selection was terrible, it's much better now.

    Perhaps one local brewer they should go super niche with some Imperial Stouts, or Lambics, Trappist style ales and the like. And really nail the recipes. I really like Cannery Brewing in Penticton, no reason why such quality could not be brewed here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesL View Post
    I've never seen Yellowhead sold in anything BUT individual bottles...

    And DeVine's hours are super annoying, IMO.
    Many places, as noted in the other thread, have it on tap.

    Hat being one of them
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    I haven't been anywhere in the world where I have actually liked Microbrewery product. If you think about it, if the product was so good, why don't they increase sales onto a country, and then international stage? The reality is such beers typically suck. And yes, I understand the novelty of it (I used to brew beer for a bit, but it was highly inconsistent and never came close to matching a European product like Gunniess or Carlsberg).

    Of Canadian beers, the only two I like to date (and I have tried many), are Grasshoper's Wheat Ale, and Keiths Pale Ale. Which is fine, most countries outside Europe only produce a couple of really world class beers.
    Last edited by moahunter; 09-04-2012 at 10:32 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter
    If you think about it, if the product was so good, why don't they increase sales onto a country, and then international stage?
    Because there's 3-4 behemoth breweries that dominate the planet's brewing and won't let anyone else come up through the ranks. And it takes a lot of money to successfully market and distribute beer, against a lot of entrenched interests.

    I'm not picky about my beer, other than light beer, but I do try to support smaller brewers when I can.

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    ^if a microbrewery beer is any good, those large corproations will buy them up and market it. I am picky about my beer, the reality is, the beers just aren't that good.

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    By definition, if a craft beer is bought by one of the super brewers and marketed in large volume around the world, it is no longer a craft beer.

    Beer, wine and other liquor's taste/quality are a completely subjective opinion. You don't think they're very good. Good for you. Not everyone shares your opinion, and in fact the craft beer market in general is growing as a proportion of the total beer market:

    http://www.brewersassociation.org/pa...atistics/facts

    -Growth of the craft brewing industry in 2011 was 13% by volume and 15% by dollars compared to growth in 2010 of 12% by volume and 15% by dollars.

    -Overall U.S. beer sales were down an estimated 1.3% by volume in 2011, 1.2% in 2010.
    It's still small by comparison, but they must be doing something right if their popularity is growing. Variety is a good thing. Imagine if the wine industry was dominated by only a dozen or so kinds of wine.
    Last edited by Marcel Petrin; 09-04-2012 at 10:45 AM.

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    ^fair enough, just because I don't like it, doesn't mean it isn't good for street life and the local economy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    I haven't been anywhere in the world where I have actually liked Microbrewery product. If you think about it, if the product was so good, why don't they increase sales onto a country, and then international stage? The reality is such beers typically suck. And yes, I understand the novelty of it (I used to brew beer for a bit, but it was highly inconsistent and never came close to matching a European product like Gunniess or Carlsberg).

    Of Canadian beers, the only two I like to date (and I have tried many), are Grasshoper's Wheat Ale, and Keiths Pale Ale. Which is fine, most countries outside Europe only produce a couple of really world class beers.
    Hit and miss, sure, but in my travels I have had a great variety of micro/local brews that have been a nice break from the typical selection. Some I am glad I just had one of, some I wish I would import, but typically I will always try a local when somewhere just for fun.
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanO View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesL View Post
    I've never seen Yellowhead sold in anything BUT individual bottles...

    And DeVine's hours are super annoying, IMO.
    Many places, as noted in the other thread, have it on tap.

    Hat being one of them
    Not what I meant -- I was referring to liquor stores. I don't think I've ever seen an option to buy a "six pack of Yellowhead". (It would be nice, though.)

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    ^correct. Big bottle only.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    Because there's 3-4 behemoth breweries that dominate the planet's brewing and won't let anyone else come up through the ranks. And it takes a lot of money to successfully market and distribute beer, against a lot of entrenched interests.

    I'm not picky about my beer, other than light beer, but I do try to support smaller brewers when I can.
    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    By definition, if a craft beer is bought by one of the super brewers and marketed in large volume around the world, it is no longer a craft beer.

    Beer, wine and other liquor's taste/quality are a completely subjective opinion. You don't think they're very good. Good for you. Not everyone shares your opinion, and in fact the craft beer market in general is growing as a proportion of the total beer market:

    http://www.brewersassociation.org/pa...atistics/facts

    -Growth of the craft brewing industry in 2011 was 13% by volume and 15% by dollars compared to growth in 2010 of 12% by volume and 15% by dollars.

    -Overall U.S. beer sales were down an estimated 1.3% by volume in 2011, 1.2% in 2010.
    It's still small by comparison, but they must be doing something right if their popularity is growing. Variety is a good thing. Imagine if the wine industry was dominated by only a dozen or so kinds of wine.
    One of your points conflicts with the other. On one hand you're arguing that microbrew isn't more popular because of market domination by the big players and on the other hand you're arguing increased market share by the microbrewers which shouldn't be possible given your first point.

    Which point are you making?
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    the uni bottles are being sold this way due to the increased cost that a 4 pack or 6 pack box or carrier would cost
    Still waiting for the Arlington site to be reborn .......

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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement
    One of your points conflicts with the other. On one hand you're arguing that microbrew isn't more popular because of market domination by the big players and on the other hand you're arguing increased market share by the microbrewers which shouldn't be possible given your first point.

    Which point are you making?
    You're trying to be too clever by half, and picking an argument for the sake of it. The two points are not mutually exclusive.

    It is difficult for small brewers to suddenly "blow up" and become major players for the reasons mentioned. They either can't grow due to lack of capital or inability to compete with the big boys in marketing or distribution, or if they do get big enough, they get swallowed whole and bought out. That doesn't preclude the market segment as a whole (comprising hundreds or thousands of individual brewers) growing as a proportion of the total market.

    http://www.economist.com/node/18651308

    Meanwhile, the biggest brewers are consolidating. The combined market share of the top four grew from 22% by volume in 1998 to nearly 50% in 2010 (from which they pocket two-thirds of combined global revenues).
    At the other end of the scale, microbreweries are bubbling. Mikkel Borg Bjergso, the proprietor of a bar in Copenhagen, makes a wonderfully light and floral pilsener, and markets it through word of mouth. He has helped to pioneer a crafty new business model. “Gypsy brewers” produce tiny quantities of inventive and flavoursome beers by hiring or borrowing other people’s breweries.

    These little brewers are so tasty that big ones are lining up to swallow them. In March ABI bought Goose Island, one of the larger American microbrewers, for $39m. Molson Coors recently bought Sharps, a British brewer of stupendous real ales. But such microdeals make little impact on the bottom line. America’s 1,800 craft brewers account for a mere 5% of the domestic market.
    So like I said, the big brewers are consolidating, and by definition are not "craft" brews (the definition varies by country). But as per my previous post, craft brews are growing as a proportion of the total market. There's no conflict there.

    So tell me, what point were you making other than arguing for the sake of it?
    Last edited by Marcel Petrin; 09-04-2012 at 04:21 PM.

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    MP the large brewers also control the expansion hopes of some brewers thru their control of access to things like bottles as well as bottling and related packaging equipment
    Still waiting for the Arlington site to be reborn .......

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    Travelling in Oregon, California there are craft brewers all over and many are producing some fantastic stuff. Mind you they're not getting stupidly rich doing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement
    One of your points conflicts with the other. On one hand you're arguing that microbrew isn't more popular because of market domination by the big players and on the other hand you're arguing increased market share by the microbrewers which shouldn't be possible given your first point.

    Which point are you making?
    You're trying to be too clever by half, and picking an argument for the sake of it. The two points are not mutually exclusive.

    It is difficult for small brewers to suddenly "blow up" and become major players for the reasons mentioned. They either can't grow due to lack of capital or inability to compete with the big boys in marketing or distribution, or if they do get big enough, they get swallowed whole and bought out. That doesn't preclude the market segment as a whole (comprising hundreds or thousands of individual brewers) growing as a proportion of the total market.

    http://www.economist.com/node/18651308

    Meanwhile, the biggest brewers are consolidating. The combined market share of the top four grew from 22% by volume in 1998 to nearly 50% in 2010 (from which they pocket two-thirds of combined global revenues).
    At the other end of the scale, microbreweries are bubbling. Mikkel Borg Bjergso, the proprietor of a bar in Copenhagen, makes a wonderfully light and floral pilsener, and markets it through word of mouth. He has helped to pioneer a crafty new business model. “Gypsy brewers” produce tiny quantities of inventive and flavoursome beers by hiring or borrowing other people’s breweries.

    These little brewers are so tasty that big ones are lining up to swallow them. In March ABI bought Goose Island, one of the larger American microbrewers, for $39m. Molson Coors recently bought Sharps, a British brewer of stupendous real ales. But such microdeals make little impact on the bottom line. America’s 1,800 craft brewers account for a mere 5% of the domestic market.
    So like I said, the big brewers are consolidating, and by definition are not "craft" brews (the definition varies by country). But as per my previous post, craft brews are growing as a proportion of the total market. There's no conflict there.

    So tell me, what point were you making other than arguing for the sake of it?
    You first stated the "Entrenched big brewers" are keeping the microbrewers down, followed by the craft brewers are gaining market share.

    May not be mutually exclusive but doesn't make a whole lot of sense arguing both and I didn't follow how you could conclude both points. Thanks for clarifying.

    I still don't buy your argument and I'll pick the simple occams razor deduction that most microbreweries aren't doing all that well because their product isn't really all that great. i.e. limited market.

    Really it seems that you confirm the point that any worthwhile microbreweries are snapped up by bigger breweries(probably for excellent price and return on initial investment)While those that aren't much are left catering to limited customers that don't mind inconsistent product.
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    Or it could be that niche products like craft beers are, well, niche products that don't necessarily even want to "go big." Again, compare the beer industry to wines. No one would say that the predominance of small wineries that produce most of the world's wine are all producing poor quality products. It's simply a market where variation and uniqueness is desired by the customers, as opposed to mass market dominance. Even if the occasional bottle/batch is mediocre or not to your taste. I see no reason why beer should be any different.

    If you want to drink the same small handful of beers over and over, that's fine. Generally if I'm just at a bar where I don't trust their taps and don't know their bottle selection I'll go for a trusty old Heineken or even a Kokanee. I have no problem drinking Pilsner or Brewhouse in the dressing room after a hockey game (screw guys who bring Coor's Light though, seriously). But if I'm at a liquor store buying a case or a couple six packs, generally I'm going to go for variety and either try something new or something that I haven't had in awhile.

    Nothing wrong with either. And I couldn't care much less what you're drinking. But you and moahunter repeatedly saying "most craft beers suck" strikes me as two people saying something just to be contrarian for the sake of it, as you often are here.

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    Marcel: thank you for being you. That was great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    Or it could be that niche products like craft beers are, well, niche products that don't necessarily even want to "go big." Again, compare the beer industry to wines. No one would say that the predominance of small wineries that produce most of the world's wine are all producing poor quality products. It's simply a market where variation and uniqueness is desired by the customers, as opposed to mass market dominance. Even if the occasional bottle/batch is mediocre or not to your taste. I see no reason why beer should be any different.

    If you want to drink the same small handful of beers over and over, that's fine. Generally if I'm just at a bar where I don't trust their taps and don't know their bottle selection I'll go for a trusty old Heineken or even a Kokanee. I have no problem drinking Pilsner or Brewhouse in the dressing room after a hockey game (screw guys who bring Coor's Light though, seriously). But if I'm at a liquor store buying a case or a couple six packs, generally I'm going to go for variety and either try something new or something that I haven't had in awhile.

    Nothing wrong with either. And I couldn't care much less what you're drinking. But you and moahunter repeatedly saying "most craft beers suck" strikes me as two people saying something just to be contrarian for the sake of it, as you often are here.
    Thanks for the reasonable reply. Not trying to be negative for the sake of it. Theres a substantial difference in brewing from batch, craft, microbrewery to that which is much more standardized product that bigger breweries put out. I used to brew beer, I like to think I got decent at it, but admittedly I didn't know from one batch to another what it would turn out like and I was picky enough that I didn't like a lot of my product. I have a great respect for the difficulty involved in brewing and how many variables can go wrong. Or not 100% right. That said I have a firm tongue for picking out must, skunk, and anything less than stellar in a brew.

    Microbrewery beer I find much more variable than mass produced beer. Much more likely to be hit or miss. If I buy a bottle of Mcewans, or Warsteiner, or Guiness I know exactly what I'm getting everytime. Reasonable quality and very consistent brew. Not so if I crack open a microbrew and misses have outnumbered the hits.

    I don't drink much beer anymore so when I do I require that it be good. I'm disappointed when its not. Distracts from my enjoyment.

    As far as contrarian a lot of that has to do with the dynamic on this board, i.e. urban vs suburban views, and that I don't subscribe much to popular thought. Right or wrong I like to evaluate anything fairly independently and often take a different view for that reason.

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    Yellowhead Brewery - business is booming

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...s-booming.html

    Beer produced by an Edmonton microbrewery has become such a hit that the company is improvising to keep up.

    The Yellowhead Brewery Company has been in business for less than two years and business is booming, success the company attributes to a heightened interest in locally-produced food.

    "We had to figure out how we're going to deal with this demand, otherwise we may run out of beer," said brewmaster Scott Harris.

    "So we decided to scale back the bottle side of things and focus on the draft side of the business right now."

    The company was bottling 1,000 brews a day at its site in downtown Edmonton until a part broke on a machine. The company will shift most of its production to draft until repairs can be made.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    I hope they fix that thing soon... for shortages of big bottles and store presence are a haunting presence in that brewery.
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    Alberta Brewing Company needs new home
    However, the business’ future years are a bit more uncertain, now that it has to pick up shop and move by July 6th.

    One week ago, the micro brewery learned rent was going to nearly triple, so it’s forced to find a new home.

    "It took us 4 months to set up and get brewing when we set up in 1st place, so this is a very nerve-racking thing," says Gibbon. “We have to find a place and literally start moving equipment tomorrow, and we don't know where we're going yet.”

    http://www.globaltvedmonton.com/albe...#ixzz1xX7cZ0lL
    This is the warehouse on 9926-78 ave. Went there for a tour in April for a friend's birthday party. Hopefully they will find a more desirable location.

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    ^ Just saw a bit on them on Global news. Never heard of them. How is the beer?
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    Just to alleviate the confusion, it's Ambers Brewing Company, not "Alberta Brewing Company"
    http://www.ambersbrewing.com/
    Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 11-06-2012 at 09:06 PM.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    ^ Good eye, thanks! Who's in charge at Global Edmonton?

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    ^ The blind monkey, the deaf and mute monkeys are on holidays.

    I wish Amber's could take over the old Molson brewery
    Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 12-06-2012 at 09:53 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bulliver View Post
    ^ Just saw a bit on them on Global news. Never heard of them. How is the beer?
    Really?

    The pale ale is in more than a few stores, mountain pepperberry is on tap around the city and Grog is often a seasonal option in better stores.

    That said, it is sad how few places carry them.
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    How about a brewery/brewpub in the warehouse district in the old Healy building
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    ^YES PLZ.

    Something with a little visibility would be awesome.

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    Amber's moving to St. Albert:
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/busin...179/story.html

    EDMONTON - Edmonton may lose one of its three microbreweries to another city later this month. Amber’s Brewing, founded by Jim Gibbon in 2006, plans to move into the Riel Business Park in St. Albert and share space with Spider Beverage Co., a beverage import company.

    The move has received approval from St. Albert’s municipal government, but the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission has yet to show thumbs-up. Gibbon expects to complete the relevant paperwork soon.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    But... but... St. Albert is an overtaxed hellhole where no business can be profitable...?
    I think of art, at its most significant, as a Distant Early Warning system that can always be relied on to tell the old culture what is beginning to happen to it. —Marshall McLuhan

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    Better than closing, but that's shame as it was in a great location.
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