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Thread: This Day in Journal History

  1. #101
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    Great photo and cool read. Very interesting.

  2. #102

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    From the Edmonton Journal, September 15, 1978. An article amidst talk of Edmonton's business focal returning to Jasper Avenue after having moved north due to Oxford's Edmonton Centre development. This was all pretty exciting shyte at the time. Still thought we compared to Calgary office development. We've waited a long time to once again witness such heady days.

    Redevelopment primer
    Redevelopment plans for west Jasper Avenue that have come to light to date:
    • The Construction of a new parkade on the site of the former Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) building on 103 Street. [Assumedly the monolithic block across from the All Saints' Anglican Cathedral.]
    • A 30-storey, $36 million office tower backed by the Montreal-based Yale Properties Ltd. between 104th and 105th Streets on the south side of Jasper Ave. [Ultimately the Standard Life Centre.]
    • A major redevelopment by Hudson's Bay Co. and Edmonton Properties Ltd. on jointly-owned property between 103rd and 104th Streets on the south side of Jasper Ave. [Never happened.]
    • An 18-storey complex proposed for the Strand Theatre site on south Jasper between 102nd and 103rd Street by First Northern Building Developments Corp. and Edmonton Properties Ltd. [IPL Tower aka Enbridge Tower.]
    • A 32-storey office tower on the south-west corner of Jasper Avenue and 103 Street by the Ottawa-based Campeau Corporation on the current site of Baydala Drugs. [Principal Plaza aka Canadian Western Bank Place.]
    • A major hotel chain will likely locate on the site across from Edmonton House, on 100th Ave. and 102 Street. [Never happened.]

  3. #103
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    Here's something I didn't know until I came across this article about a week ago: : March 7, 1968: No shopping Wednesdays hits wrong note for entertainer Liberace.

    It's not about the late entertainer, but rather, the fact that Edmonton had a law against shopping on Wednesdays 11 months of the year (I'd assume December was obviously the exception due to Christmas season) from 1938 until 1976.

    Sure, we all know that many cities, including Edmonton, used to not allow shopping on Sundays. But Wednesdays? That sounds kind of weird. Was there a reason behind this kind of ruling?
    Is there hope for Edmonton? Yes!!! The Oilers? Wait and see.

  4. #104
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    March 31, 1982: Socreds call it quits

    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...181/story.html
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  5. #105

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    March 31, 1982: Socreds call it quits

    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...181/story.html
    Amazing position to take (see below). I'd say every other party since has also lost grass roots support but had continued as long as funding has been available.

    The historic decision made at a party board meeting, effectively signalled the party’s end as the active political force that once held power for 36 years,” the Journal’s Duncan Thorne wrote.

    Before the meeting, interim leader Ray Speaker said the party had lost its grassroots support.

  6. #106
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    April 14, 1967: Move to save Rutherford House falters
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...388/story.html

    We almost lost this, for the same excuses being bandied about today for not preserving historical buildings
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    April 30, 1982: Journal restaurant reviewer is persona non grata
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...763/story.html

    Basile’s Restaurant pulled the welcome mat on the Journal’s food editor and restaurant reviewer after she gave it a less than stellar review.

    “Judy Schultz of the Journal is not welcome at Basile’s,” read a sign at the entrance to the restaurant in the Continental Bank Building, 10250 101st St.
    The butthurt was strong with that one.
    BTW where in the current HSBC building was this restaurant located?
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  8. #108
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    To Top_Dawg's recollection the whole lobby was configured way differently than now.

    The place was on two levels.

    Main floor was the dining lounge.

    Upper floor was the lounge which turned into a nightclub in the evening.

    You could accress it several different ways.

    From City Center East ( then Eaton Center ) and from 101 Street ( where Mucho-Burn-O-ring is now ).

    You could also access it directly from a parkade somehow.

    Top_Dawg remembers that the servers were really hot.

    Then again seventeen year olds are basically walking boners trying to find any warm hole to stick it in.

    For its time it was a pretty happening place.

    But thinking about it now - in today's context - it was actually pretty lame.

    Top_Dawg is not surprised to read that the place owed money everywhere.

    Everyone there had a real pretentious air about them but you could sense it was all phony.

    After having lived a little Top_Dawg soon realized that those who so desperately try to blow smoke up your azz about how smart they are, how accomplished they are, how successful they are, how educated they are, how sophisticated they are - almost invariably turn out to be none of the above.
    Last edited by Top_Dawg; 30-04-2015 at 10:37 AM.

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    May 4, 1995: Edmonton Queen finally launched
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...069/story.html

    Hundreds of spectators lined the banks of Whitemud Creek to watch the Edmonton Queen riverboat splash into the North Saskatchewan River for the first time.

    The 210-tonne, all-steel paddlewheeler “slowly, noisily, slithered down wooden ramps made slick with lard,” before hitting the water, the Journal’s Don Thomas wrote.

    It had been ready for the river almost two years earlier but was tied up by litigation.

    Development company Carrington Properties bought the troubled riverboat for $800,000 in early 1995 after the Federal Court of Canada ordered it put up for sale following the failure of the North Saskatchewan Riverboat Company.

    The Edmonton Queen had been the lifelong dream of Edmonton businessman Ray Collins, who had been captivated by stories of the steam boats that had churned up and down the North Saskatchewan a century earlier. Collins and two other businessmen had formed the North Saskatchewan Riverboat Company.
    Collins’s first bid to recreate the riverboat era came in 1964 when he had a 15-metre sternwheeler, called the Little Klondike Queen, built to run between Laurier Park and Big Island. The business venture failed and in 1967 the Klondike Queen was sold.

    Collins revived the idea 20 years later. On April 2, 1992, Mayor Jan Reimer called a news conference to announce a $3.4-million venture, with money from the province and the federal government. The city spent $196,000 to build a dock site below the convention centre.

    The boat was built that winter by Scott Steel in east Edmonton and was to be launched May 2, 1993. The launch date was delayed due to late delivery of equipment. Then Scott Steel refused to release the boat, saying it was still owed $1.35 million.

    The Queen remained in Scott Steel’s yard during two years of legal wrangling before Collins’s company declared bankruptcy and Carrington Properties stepped in.
    I also recall Michael Phair trying to prevent the launch of the riverboat for a long time, can't remember why.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    May 15, 1986: Mobile phone service arrives in Edmonton

    Edmonton Telephones, now Telus, initially aimed its cellular service at the business community, which could afford the high cost of the equipment and the steep user charges.

    Monthly access charges ranged up to $44.95, with a per-minute charge in peak periods of from 28 to 90 cents, depending on the rate package selected. The phone company did not handle the hardware.

    There were four suppliers of cellular equipment, ranging from Tandy’s $1,900 portable unit, to fancier units by Novatel and Canadian General Electric, and a deluxe briefcase-housed phone by Brooktel, costing more than $6,000.

    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...105/story.html

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    May 26, 1995: Groups campaign for a business-friendly city council
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...616/story.html
    An anonymous group of young businessmen calling themselves the Edmonton Stickmen paid for billboards with pointed messages aimed at city council and at citizens as a whole.

    “Edmonton. Does anybody care anymore?” read one sign posted downtown above 104th Avenue.
    It was followed by other messages: “Do we need a change?” and, calling council “the best advertising Calgary ever had.”

    Their purpose was to get a pro-business council elected that October.
    Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 31-05-2015 at 02:19 PM.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    May 28, 1967: St Joseph's Basilica opens
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...211/story.html

    For almost 30 years, St. Joseph’s Basilica was known as the “church without locks” — the only church in Western Canada open for prayer 24 hours a day.

    On this day, the then cathedral’s doors — which had no locks — were wide open from 2 to 5 p.m. for 1,800 Edmontonians who attended the open house.

    The unlocked doors were among the many facts and figures they learned about one of the city’s largest churches and the only basilica in Alberta. Visitors of nearly all denominations were organized in groups of 30 to 40 for the 30-minute tours. Groups of 10-15 had been expected.

    The groundbreaking took place in 1913 and the parish came into being in 1917 with the separation of English parishioners from their French counterparts at nearby St. Joachim.

    Construction was interrupted by two world wars and the Great Depression before it was completed in 1963.
    The church without locks began locking up at night after an arsonist set the altar and crucifix on fire in February 1980.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    May 30, 1990: ‘Beer bellies and big bikes’ get the boot from Whyte Avenue
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...615/story.html

    Ald. Lance White shared other bikers’ frustration after a city decision to heave Harleys from Whyte Avenue.

    City council’s executive committee voted unanimously to outlaw a special motorcycle parking area in front of the Commercial Hotel that had been a fixture for Saturday afternoon blues jams, wrote Journal reporter Mike Sadava.

    Bikers from then on had to park their hogs hidden away in a parking lot behind the hotel.
    The long-standing row between the bikers and Whyte Avenue merchants had resurfaced the previous month when Princess Theatre owner Susan Morrow complained about the bikers disturbing kids and parents waiting in line for the Saturday movie matinee.

    “Don Belanger, executive director of the Old Strathcona Foundation, said about five other businesses had complained, but he wouldn’t name them,” Sadava wrote.

    “It’s not sanitization of Old Strathcona,” Belanger said. “The bikes are still part of the ambience — we just want them to park in the back.”

    Transportation general manager John Schnablegger said other denizens of Whyte Avenue were dealing with “very subtle intimidation” from the bikers.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  14. #114
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    heh read that too and thought about posting. Thanks SDM. Were there that many bikes parked along the (dead) strip back in the day?

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    June 29, 1982: The Clash unleashes furious set at Kinsmen
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...255/story.html

    “For a few minutes in the smoke-filled Fuehrerbunker known as the Kinsmen Fieldhouse, it seemed The Clash might not have the chance to live up to its legend as ‘The Only Band That Matters,’ ” began a Journal concert review.

    “After kicking off with a rousing London Calling, followed by Spanish Bombs, the British quartet had to halt a crunching rendition of Know Your Rights when the press at stage front became so oppressive it seemed some of the audience might fall on a thicket of nail-filled boards.”

    Guitarist-lead vocalist Joe Strummer (born John Graham Mellor) exhorted everyone to “try not to be an animal out there,” as police officers (one with cotton balls in his ears) mounted the stage. The boards were removed, the crowd stepped back and “The Clash proceeded to unleash the most powerful and uncompromising rock rave-up since Elvis Costello and Bob Marley visited here in 1978 and 1979, respectively,” the review said.

    “True, somebody spat on Strummer during Bankrobber (prompting him to say he would ‘brain’ the offending individual should he continue). True, you had to be in an arc 60 metres from the stage to really appreciate the band, the Kinsmen being an acoustic nowhere land. True, the heat near the stage was almost suffocating. Yet The Clash — not to mention a good number of its 7,000 devotees — persevered.

    “In a sense, the show was almost too much to take. Wearing ‘designer’ fatigues (Strummer had a Special Forces-Mohican cut à la DeNiro in Taxi Driver), playing through a brutally loud sound system, the band drove through tune after tune like possessed rock shock troops, as a rear-screen projector splayed pictures of want ads, handguns, Margaret Thatcher, Lech Walesa, the Ayatollah, brick walls and Lord knows what else behind the net-covered stage.”

    The highlights of the show were Somebody Got Murdered, The Magnificent Seven, Career Opportunities and Police and Thieves.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    July 13, 1993: Lang strikes a pose that would make Norman Rockwell blush

    The August edition of Vanity Fair with a steamy cover photo of Edmonton-born singer k.d. lang and celebrity supermodel Cindy Crawford in a playful take on a Norman Rockwell scene hit Canadian newsstands.

    Lang, dressed in manly clothing, sits in a barber’s chair with her head resting against Crawford’s chest while the model, in a skimpy swimsuit, shave’s the singer’s face with a straight razor. The photo was lang’s idea.

    Another photo, that showed the two women face to face in a hands-on horizontal embrace, also shot by photographer Herb Ritts, illustrated a cover story about the 31-year-old singer who grew up in the central Alberta farming community of Consort.
    “Just in case there’s anyone out there who hasn’t yet heard that lang is a lesbian, the gender-bending performer talks in great detail about the subject,” the Journal wrote in advance of the magazine coming out.

    Lang publicly declared her homosexuality in an interview with a U.S. gay and lesbian publication the previous year.


    Funny thing is I remember this.

    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...017/story.html

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    July 15, 1952: Jasper Park Lodge main building burns to the ground

    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...998/story.html
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    ...long-haired freaky people need not apply...
    July 18, 1970: Court dismisses charge against restaurant owner who wouldn’t serve ‘hippies’


    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...454/story.html
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    July 30, 1960: World’s smallest two-storey building to be demolished

    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...893/story.html


    The Mite Block, billed as the world’s smallest two-storey building, has been sold for $3,000 and will be torn down.
    The structure, made of hollow terra cotta brick, and located at 9701 Jasper Avenue, just east of what is now Thornton Court, had been featured in Ripley’s Believe It Or Not newspaper feature in 1947 and was declared a historic landmark.
    George Andrew Collins, owner of the wedged-shaped structure, said sold the building and its 2.7 metres of frontage to a clothing store proprietor next door. The land would be used to expand the clothing store.
    Collins also owned Imperial Taxi which had used the 46-year-old building as a main office.
    The Mite had two storeys and a basement. It was built in 1913 by Arthur Bloomer, a real estate and insurance agent. It would go on to house a jewelry store, candy stores, and of taxi cab operations.
    Collins said he regretted selling the historic building almost from the moment he signed the sales agreement. “I couldn’t sleep last night,” he said. “This morning I offered to take the building back. I said to the man, ‘do you want to make $200 if you’ll tear up the agreement?’ He wouldn’t go for it.”
    The buyer of the building, Ben Birenbaum of Ben’s Bargain Store. said he planned to demolish the building in August.
    “Asked about the historical value of the building, he said Edmontonians should be glad to see if go because “it isn’t good for anything, and it doesn’t look good on Jasper Avenue.’”
    James Falconer, chairman of the city archives and landmarks committee, said it was “disappointing to hear that the building will disappear, but I guess we can’t stand in the way of progress.”
    The committee would probably be looking into the matter, he added, but he doubted anything could be done.
    “I’d like to see it incorporated in the new building in some way,” he said. “It would be a first-rate attraction for any store.”
    Attempts were made to save the Mite, but the terra cotta brick it was made of was too fragile to move and rebuild on another site. The structure was dismantled Aug. 17, 1960.


    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Aug. 1, 1974: Province swoops in to take over Pacific Western Airlines

    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/opini...523/story.html


    The Alberta government entered the airline business by acquiring controlling interest in Pacific Western Airlines (PWA) *— the B.C.-based air carrier which did about 75 per cent of its gross revenue in Alberta.
    The acquisition of the country’s third biggest airline cost the government an estimated $36 million.
    In so doing, “Premier Pete (Peter Lougheed) apparently decided to borrow from the tactics of the NDP governments that flank Alberta to the east and west,” noted a Journal editorial titled ‘Pete’s Wingy Asset.’
    “He offers us the spectacle of a Conservative free-enterprise government slipping across the border into socialist B.C. with the NDP-style objective of nationalizing a free-enterprise corporation,” the editorial said.
    Lougheed described the takeover of the 21-aircraft operation as a very logical move — one of the keys in the government’s move to diversifying the provincial economy, and to assure the development to north and Western Canada.
    “The threat of a takeover of the airline by outsiders; the important function PWA played in Alberta’s role as the gateway to the north; and the need to wisely invest the province’s oil revenues, expected to be $900 million in 1989, were the premier’s reasons for the takeover,” Journal writer Armin Hecht reported.
    Dr. Charles Allard, president of Allarco Developments Ltd., said the government’s fears of PWA being taken over by interests outside the province were completely groundless. International Jet Air of Calgary, a wholly-owned Allarco subsidiary, had been on the verge of completing an agreement under which International’s routes and assets would have been traded for a controlling bloc of PWA stock.
    The government was fully aware of these negotiations, and had no reason to suspect control of the airline would leave Alberta, Allard added.
    “This intrusion into a business that does not require government participation is rather shocking and disappointing to me, and I think it’s an action that’s hardly consistent with a government that’s supposed to be oriented toward free enterprise.”
    Lougheed said he hoped that with an injection of provincial capital into PWA’s freight operation the airline would be able to build bridges between landlocked Alberta and its world markets.
    The government returned the airline to the private sector in 1983.
    PWA later became Canadian Airlines, and was taken over by Air Canada in 2001.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Aug. 22, 1965: There’s little glamour on the ‘McMurray Special’
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...491/story.html

    This was a train to Fort Mac that stopping running in 1991
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Whoah. Never knew. And as recent as 1991.

    Thanks for this!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    Aug. 22, 1965: There’s little glamour on the ‘McMurray Special’
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...491/story.html

    This was a train to Fort Mac that stopping running in 1991
    Think of the savings in fuel and lives had it kept running. Maybe instead of twinning the highway, the rail should have been double tracked to improve speed.

    Then there's the potential to just get trucks off the highway...
    ... For example, an average BNSF train hauls as much freight as does 280 trucks. ... , as it can move an average of one ton of goods 470 miles on a single gallon of diesel fuel. ...

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=Dfp...rucks.&f=false
    Last edited by KC; 23-08-2015 at 09:56 AM.

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    Aug. 24, 1990: After 10 years, Edmonton Trappers are outta here! Almost
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...919/story.html

    On the verge of their first playoff appearance in six years, the Edmonton Trappers of the Pacific Coast League were sold by owner Peter Pocklington to a New York businessman for $5 million.

    The buyer was Mike Nicklous of Staten Island, who announced he was moving the Triple A baseball team to Memphis, Tenn. for the next season.

    The Trappers were the former Ogden A’s of Ogden, Utah, the Triple A farm team of the Oakland Athletics. Pocklington bought and moved the team here before the start of the 1981 season. They became the farm team of the California Angels in 1984.
    Nicklous backed out of the deal two months later, after fans rallied to keep the Trappers in Edmonton.

    A task force was formed to study the funding possibilities of a new baseball stadium, something Nicklous said was necessary if the team was to stay in Edmonton.
    The 45-year-old John Ducey Park was replaced by the 9,200-seat Telus Field in 1995.

    The Trappers remained in Edmonton until 2004, winning PCL titles in 1984, 1996, 1997 and 2002.

    The Edmonton Eskimos of the Canadian Football League bought the Trappers franchise from Pocklington for $8 million in 1999, then shocked baseball fans in 2003 when they sold the team for $10.5 million to former Major League Baseball pitcher Nolan Ryan and his son, who moved the team to Round Rock, Tex.

    The Eskimos justified the sale by saying their PCL partners were unhappy having to travel great distances to and from Edmonton. Other PCL teams also didn’t like Edmonton’s playing conditions in spring and fall.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Day in History, Oct. 15, 1945: Alberta miners end two-week strike over meat rationing

    Approximately 1,500 miners in Edmonton and other parts of central Alberta returned to work after a two-week strike protesting government meat rationing.

    Even though the Second World War had officially ended Sept. 2, rationing continued, due in part to Canada shipping a lot of food and other goods to help postwar Europe.

    Strikes, or what the miners called “holidays,” started in various parts of the province after miners complained they were not receiving sufficient meat under the dominion (Canadian) government’s rationing system.
    http://edmontonjournal.com/news/nati...meat-rationing

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    Day in History, Oct. 23, 1945: Trapp Family Singers perform in Edmonton
    http://edmontonjournal.com/news/loca...rm-in-edmonton

    Twenty years before they were immortalized by Hollywood in the 1965 musical drama The Sound of Music, the Austrian von Trapp family performed before 1,500 people at the Empire Theatre.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Day in History, Nov. 9, 1960: Farm family evicted for new Edmonton International Airport
    http://edmontonjournal.com/news/loca...tional-airport

    Four-year-old Dennis Prysko and his mother, Mabel, cried as their family was evicted from their 80-acre farm in Nisku on the site of the new Edmonton International Airport.

    William Prysko, 46, had rejected government offers and an exchequer court award of $24,659 (which would be $200,500 in 2015) for the land, prompting a deputy sheriff and a five-man crew, accompanied by RCMP officers, lawyers and department of transport officials, to arrive on his property and begin hauling away his machinery and equipment. The airport was set to open within a week.

    The group arrived in a fleet of cars and truck. Lawyer William G. Morrow, representing the Crown, offered Prysko the exchequer cheque, which he refused.
    “It’s not that we’re so attached to this place, but where can we go for $24,300?” Mabel Prysko asked. “We wouldn’t be able to buy anything but the poorest land, and we wouldn’t be able to build a house.”

    Cpl. D. L. Madill with the Leduc RCMP asked the farmer if he had any guns on the property. “Sure, but you don’t have to worry,” said Prysko and led the way to his garage, where Madill removed a 12-gauge shotgun and .22 calibre rifle and handed them to the deputy sheriff.

    The expropriation case had been ongoing since 1957. Prysko wanted $98,650 for the land. The government initially offered $24,300, later increasing that to $26,750. The case went to court, where the judge ruled Prysko’s claim was excessive and awarded the family $24,300, plus $350 in court costs.

    Prysko, his wife and son Dennis were at home during the eviction. Another son, six-year-old Garry, was at school in Leduc.

    “Let them move us. They’re the ones who are doing it,” Mabel said tearfully. Asked if the family had any place to go, she replied: “None whatsoever.”

    The family had lived for 20 years in a four-room frame home on the farm property. They had 62 head of Hereford cattle and grew some grain.

    The family’s possessions were hauled to a neighbouring farm and their cattle taken to the municipal pound at Leduc. The farmhouse was torn down and the airport began operating Nov. 15.

    After the eviction, the family briefly lived for free in a hotel in Leduc. They eventually moved to a farm near Camrose.
    Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 09-11-2015 at 08:22 AM.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  28. #128
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    Wow, $200,000 for 80 acres of Nisku land. Somebody made out like bandits. What a steal.

  29. #129
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    Day in History, Nov. 27, 1948: New oil town developed in less than a year

    The discovery of oil at Leduc on Feb. 12, 1947, brought in a gush of workers and their families into the area. Inadequate water, power and sewage infrastructure to handle the sudden population increase prompted Imperial Oil to create a new, company-built town for its employees.

    The company paid $24,000 for a quarter section of wheat field on the south bank of the North Saskatchewan River, three kilometres north of the Leduc No. 1 well site, 26 km southwest of Edmonton. Ten months later, it was occupied by a modern $2-million village with 500-600 residents. It was incorporated as a town in 1950.

    The boom town was named Devon after the Devonian period, the geological formation within which the Leduc oilfield was found.

    “Devon’s overnight development is unique in construction annals of the history of Alberta,” the Journal reported. “It is unique that at present there is no town council or administration other than Imperial officials who are guiding the estate organization.”

    With the initial assistance of the town planning branch of the Alberta government and the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, “the administration has done in a few months a job that has taken other towns in Alberta 40 years to half a century to do.”
    Residents lived in 123 houses, costing $3,600-$6,800 each. There were also dormitories for single workers.

    According to Alberta Culture and Tourism’s website, not all rig workers could afford to buy a home in Devon, so a trailer and shack community called Shack Town sprang up on the outskirts of town.

    Recreational and entertainment facilities included a theatre, swimming pool, fitness centre, auditorium, and curling and skating rinks, as well as public buildings and services like a hospital and fire and emergency services. The town had a modern water and sewer infrastructure and used natural gas for heating.

    As of 2014, Devon had a population of 6,650.
    http://edmontonjournal.com/business/...ss-than-a-year

  30. #130

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    Day in History: Dec. 23, 1957: Massive blaze razes downtown dry-cleaning plant

    Chris Zdeb, Edmonton Journal

    "Christmas shopping was temporarily forgotten by hundreds of people who crowded the sidewalks on 103rd Street to watch firefighters battle a massive fire that destroyed Trudeau’s Cleaners and Dyers Ltd.

    Two employees were taken to hospital with burns. Damage was estimated at $560,000.

    Fire broke out shortly before 1 p.m. after an explosion rocked the three-storey brick building, located a half-block south of Jasper Avenue. "

    Full story - http://edmontonjournal.com/business/...cleaning-plant
    www.decl.org

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    Day in History: Dec. 24, 1925: Journal newsies show 'remarkable self-control' at annual Christmas dinner

    "Some 150 boys gathered in front of the Journal building at 7 p.m. sharp, and led by the “redoubtable” H.V. ‘Curly’ Wootton, assistant circulation manager, paraded down 101st Street to the Royal George Hotel for their annual Christmas banquet, the Journal reported the next day.

    The newsies, who “day in and day out ‘midst winter’s blast and in summer heat sell the Journal on street corners demonstrated their loyalty and enthusiasm toward the Journal and its ideals,” the paper reported. “The pep with which they bellowed out the famous, ‘Sell-Sell-Sell, Yell-Yell-Yell, J-o-u-r-n-a-l’ was a treat and perhaps a little dangerous even to the stout timber of the Royal George dining room."

    Full story - http://edmontonjournal.com/news/loca...ristmas-dinner
    www.decl.org

  32. #132
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    No More History!

    Chris Zdeb got the boot.

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    Awful. One of my favorite reads within the Journal is no more. Just sad.

  34. #134
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    I hope someone else takes it over. In the meantime, new Day in History articles are still being published, although they are the remainder of Zdeb's articles.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  35. #135
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    Wasn't sure where to put this, thought a little bump of this wonderful thread was needed.

    August 17, 1987: New Eaton's opens its doors

    With just a sign on the sidewalk and letters to loyal customers, a new Eaton's store in downtown Edmonton opened its doors.The giant four-level department store was the anchor for the Eaton Centre mall featuring 55 stores and services. The new mall opened a few days later and became a hub for downtown commerce.

    Edmonton was experiencing a boom in new shopping centres. Mill Woods Town Centre was being built and the second phase of Kingsway Garden Mall was set to open the following year.
    A flurry of shoppers filled the new Eaton's store on the day it opened, getting cash registers beeping.

    Some shoppers were delighted to have a new large-scale department store downtown so they could avoid heading to West Edmonton Mall, which had opened in 1981.

    The downtown Eaton's closed its doors in 1999 when the Eaton's chain went out of business.

    The Bay moved in to the former Eaton's space.

    Eaton Centre eventually joined with neighbouring Edmonton Centre to become Edmonton City Centre.

    We are now experiencing another boom in Edmonton's downtown but some complaints remain the same, as one Eaton's customer said on opening day: "The biggest problem is still parking, I love shopping downtown."

    In the video there are many scenic views of downtown Edmonton and a frenzy of shoppers in the newly opened store, as reported by Harry Nuttall on Aug. 17, 1987 on CBC Newsday.
    Check out the archived 2 minute CBC video newstory within the link. Gotta love the 80s!

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...oors-1.3726664

  36. #136

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    Thanks for that.

    They also mentioned a new Woodward's store for Millwoods...

    Where are Woodward's and Eaton's now? So sad that they are gone. The old Eaton's restaurant/diner and the Woodward's food floor were favorite haunts for me.
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

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    Edmonton Oilers history: Paul Coffey scores four goals in 6-5 win over host Calgary Flames, Dec. 26, 1984

    Coffey is very crisp in Calgary

    Oilers 14 points up in Battle of Alberta


    By JIM MATHESON
    Journal Staff Writer

    Oilers 6 Flames 5


    CALGARY — Paul Coffey leaves most of the dirty work to the butlers of the sport, the bangers like Kevin Lower and Lee Fogolin. But be cleaned up on the Calgary Flames Wednesday night, scoring the first four-goal game of his National Hockey League career.

    All four of his goals were scored at Reggie Lemelin’s doorstep as he used his big wheels to get into the play as a fourth forward. Three came on Wayne Gretzky plays as he dipsied and doodled in picture efforts.

    “Give all the credit to Coffey,” said Lemelin, who was beaten for the winner with 194 seconds to play, “but it’s always Gretzky circling, then zingo! We just turn away from Wayne and circle.

    We may as well circle and go to the big red circle at centre ice.”

    Coffey, who only had one other hattrick in his five NHL years (at Minnesota, Dec. 11,1982), had just nine goals this season before outburst against Lemelin. In none of the Oilers’ previous

    33 games had he scored more than once. But he raced into the play to bang a rebound past Lemelin as the Flames tried for their fifth power-play goal in the dying stages.
    http://edmontonjournal.com/sports/ho...es-dec-26-1984

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