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Thread: With soylent would your kitchen be a luxury room?

  1. #1

    Default With soylent would your kitchen be a luxury room?

    While not a new idea, and not involving eating people yet, this is pretty neat, basically a geek is developing a nutritionally complete diet that may cost five dollars a day:

    http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog...08/20/soylent/

    Better than the crap (eg tv dinners, hamburger helper) most North Americans eat.

    Does this appeal to you? While I don't think I could exclusivley do this, the idea of not cooking during the work week has an attraction to me.

  2. #2
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    Gross.

    I love to cook, and I'm quite good at it. I can cook a tasty, nutritional meal in under a half hour for $10, and have leftovers for lunch the next day

    Can't say the idea of soylent is appealing in the least.
    Over promise and under deliver. It’s the most Edmonton thing you can do.

  3. #3

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    I love to cook, and I'm quite good at it. I can cook a tasty, nutritional meal in under a half hour for $10, and have leftovers for lunch the next day
    Which is great, sounds much like my cooking, but many people (including me when tired) also eat a lot of crap. This product aims to be nutritionally about perfect, which is way better thaN a frozen pizza, tv dinner, or big mac and fries.

  5. #5

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    We are omnivores

    All these fad diets, purging & cleansings, just seem to make people less healthy.

    We should eat & drink everything in moderation and get a reasonable level of exercise and enjoy life. Remember that James Fixx died at the age of 52 of atherosclerosis.

    Last edited by Edmonton PRT; 06-09-2013 at 07:15 PM.
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  6. #6

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    http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog...08/20/soylent/

    More than likely a new diet fad of the week. It will be advertised like hell, someone will get very rich, then it will fade away only to be tweaked and resurrected a couple of years from now. If you do not want to cook a meal for any reason have a replacement meal product like Boost or Ensure. At least they are products that hospitals and dieticians recommend when solid food can't be ate or are not available.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
    We should eat & drink everything in moderation and get a reasonable level of exercise and enjoy life. Remember that James Fixx died at the age of 52 of atherosclerosis.
    Fixx was genetically disposed to heart attacks, and smoked heavily and was obese before finding exercise.

    My personal view is that eating poorly can shorten your life (the fat builds up in your arteries over your life, finding exercise late in life wont "fixx" that). Good eating and exercise, I'm not sure will extent your life, but will likely leave your last years more enjoyable with less weakness / illness.

    I think the attraction of this product could be that it has a similar convenience factor and price as fast food, but has much better (if not perfect) nutritional value. As Gemini mentions, hospitals can keep people healthy with drip food that is nutritionally sufficient - this products tries to achieve the same but in an easier drinkable form.
    Last edited by moahunter; 07-09-2013 at 07:07 AM.

  8. #8

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    Ars Technica: Nothing but the Soylent: We’re trying 1 full week of the meal substitute



    At least they use BioWare mugs to drink the future!
    I think of art, at its most significant, as a Distant Early Warning system that can always be relied on to tell the old culture what is beginning to happen to it. —Marshall McLuhan

  9. #9

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    It's not really healthy to just drink liquid meal substitutes for weeks at a time. Your body needs to chew real food (gets the gastric juices flowing) and digest it. Your stomach needs the texture and bulk of different foods to keep your digestive track healthy and working properly. If you are convalescing or trying to loose a little bit weight I guess it's O.K. to go the liquid route but it's not something a person should do for long periods of time.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  10. #10
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    You know, I totally get that the body needs a variety of food textures and composition to maintain optimum health. But, unlike 240GLT, I do not like to cook. I don't even really usually like to eat (though you couldn't tell by my waistline). I mostly like the sensation of fading out and tremours even worse. I would do well with a prescribed meal plan. So I find these experiments fascinating.

    Eve

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dialog View Post
    Ars Technica: Nothing but the Soylent: We’re trying 1 full week of the meal substitute



    At least they use BioWare mugs to drink the future!


    Looks like something that comes out of Top_Dawg after a four day bender.

  12. #12

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    ^some reviews say it has a similar consistency to semen. Still, no cooking...

  13. #13

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    ^source......................
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^some reviews say it has a similar consistency to semen. Still, no cooking...
    Wow, I guess it will fly off the shelves with reviews like that. Wonder what demo-graph he is trying to reach with those insightful reviews.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^some reviews say it has a similar consistency to semen. Still, no cooking...
    Or did they mean Seamen?



    Soylent Green "Now fish flavored with real seamen!"
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  17. #17

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    We don't have to eat soylent, yet, but I imagine the day will come, sooner rather later, when it will be the subsistence diet for the 99%.

    As for additives and what not -- it's easy enough to label anything you like in any way you like.

  18. #18

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    OK, I'm using soylent now, its available to Canadian's, and relativley cheap. I am replacing dinner with it, so one pack lasts for two nights. The latest version, 1.5, does not require added oils or similar. Its fully vegan, and meets recommended fat / protein / carb needs.

    My review? I love it - easy to prepare. Its cheap. Tastes ok (a bit like mild soy milk). That 2,000 calories for two days meets half of my macro and micro nutrient needs. And, I don't feel hungry after. Beats junk food, or pre-packaged food. Two people in my work who also live alone at the moment, have also decided to try it, and are liking it. I'll put in a plug, if you want to try it, per below:

    www.soylent.com

    There are people living just on Soylent now. I read they needed to tweak the formula a bit to add more salt because people were fainting without it, I guess over time it will get better.
    Last edited by moahunter; 28-07-2015 at 01:46 PM.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    Beats .. pre-packaged food.
    Isn't that the same?

    It's not a diet fad, is it? You can still supplement your Soylent shake with a prime rib steak, sushi, etc..

  20. #20

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    ^I guess you are right, its packaged food, although its nutritionally complete (unlike a TV dinner), even meets fiber needs. I am just using to replace a couple of meals, but it could be used just to replace snacks or similar.

    Its not a diet fad, more a creation by a bunch of geeky people who don't want to bother to make food anymore. Its got broader application though I think. For example, if you were to replace your meals with a product like Ensure, you would be ingesting a huge amount of sugar (and it would cost a lot). With this product, that's not a concern.
    Last edited by moahunter; 28-07-2015 at 03:07 PM.

  21. #21
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    There is a new "Soylent"-esque product called Ambronite that supposedly tastes better, and is made with 100% organic foods rather than extracts and artificial supplements.

    http://us.ambronite.com/

    Seems to me that this might be good while lightweight hiking. I can't imagine why someone would want to replace meals with this junk. That is just cutting out the best part of life - eating.

  22. #22

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    ^massive difference in price and different shelf life. Personally, I don't believe GMO's are harmful, but can pay if think otherwise.

    As to me, I'm still eating fruit / vegetables for lunch, and my regular breakfast (eggs, toast, or similar). I just find, living alone, this is a very convienent way to make dinner. And, I'm not alone in being lazy about dinner, as any supermarket will show you (filled with processed junk full of sugar or salt / not even trying to be nutritionally complete).

    Here's a comparo of the two (note, Soylent has improved quite a bit since this article):

    http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/...its-not-cheap/

    Soylent’s runaway crowdfunding success (and its large DIY community) has made it clear that there’s a geek market for easy-to-prepare nutrition, but inherent mistrust of "lab food" is still a huge roadblock to widespread adoption. Ambronite handily leaps that barrier, offering what it categorizes as comparable nutrition benefits. However, as with foods of all types, Ambronite’s organic components come at a huge premium over Soylent’s processed ingredients.
    Another interesting quote:

    Rhinehart acknowledges we will never know everything about the human diet. But he counters that the bulk of the company’s investment is poured into optimizing Soylent’s nutritional profile based on established knowledge and current research; most other modern food companies spend their money on marketing. He rejects the idea that another system is already optimized for human nutrition: natural food.

    “Plants didn’t evolve to sustain humans, they evolved to sustain themselves. It’s really somewhat of a workaround that we’ve put so much work into agriculture and selective breeding,” he says. “What if we just looked at the specifics of what we need nutritionally and tried to get those directly? I find that a much more efficient process.”

    Rhinehart also believes that food-processing technology, when harnessed for consumer good rather than corporate profit, is far more efficient than relying on many smaller laboratories filled with variable equipment, a.k.a the home kitchen. He noted the massive scale of food waste, for one. But Soylent’s plan isn’t to replace cooking entirely.

    “Cooking should be more of a hobby. Eating should be more of a social activity rather than a manufacturing bottleneck, where you have to produce these calories for your body every single day. Doing so with manual labour seems a little arcane.”
    http://www.thestar.com/news/world/20...to-canada.html
    Last edited by moahunter; 28-07-2015 at 03:52 PM.

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^I guess you are right, its packaged food, although its nutritionally complete (unlike a TV dinner), even meets fiber needs. I am just using to replace a couple of meals, but it could be used just to replace snacks or similar.

    Its not a diet fad, more a creation by a bunch of geeky people who don't want to bother to make food anymore. Its got broader application though I think. For example, if you were to replace your meals with a product like Ensure, you would be ingesting a huge amount of sugar (and it would cost a lot). With this product, that's not a concern.
    Cripes, how lazy can people get if they don't want to make food anymore.
    I get real tired of these princesses on who say they don't cook or, better yet, they don't know how to cook. Food is not just to sustain us, it's also a reason we sit down as families or socialize with friends etc. I fail to see how drinking some green/blue/yellow/whatever goo is going keep people happy for any length of time. If a person has been under the weather or just wants to loose a few quick pounds I guess at a stretch this stuff could be useful. By no means should it be used as a product that is taken to replace too many meals. There is absolutely very little to digesting these types of products. We need the bulk that actually food produces to keep stomach and bowel muscles working. Getting back to not cooking or not knowing how to cook. You people out there who fall under this banner please get help. If you have kids it's not healthy for them to be brought up on take-outs, pre-packaged foods, refined crap and supplementary liquids.
    Enjoy food but eat everything in moderation and try to move around a bit.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Cripes, how lazy can people get if they don't want to make food anymore. .
    You mean, like about 90% of the population, who seem to just buy packaged food (like pasta sauce or KD or Hamburger helper) and heat it up? Have a look next time you go shopping at the cart next to you, and how much of the food will result in real cooking, versus something they are going to microwave or heat up that meets few nuritional needs and is full of potentially harmful substances (excess sugars, salts, artificial flavours).

    Its interesting, we have dishwashers, clothes washers, clothes dryers. What so scary about automating the food aspect, and at least having nutritionally complete food (has fiber) as opposed to what most people are eating today (hence the obestiy epidemic)? If everyone only had Soylent in the correct calorie amounts, then the population would be much more healthy than is currently the case with most people overweight or obese. Its fine to preach "everyone should eat raw food" or "everyone should cook without processed food", but the reality today, when people are living alone, or both partners working full time, is that most people are failing miserably. Having a snack glass of Soylent beats reaching for the Lays any day of the week, its just as cheap, and fills you up just as much.
    Last edited by moahunter; 28-07-2015 at 04:29 PM.

  25. #25

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    ^For one thing your nutritionally complete food will taste the same every time drink it. How boring is that. It may have fibre in it but it has no bulk. I should imagine after a few days of drinking it you would be bored out your mind and have diarrhea/constipation to contend with.
    As for looking at the shopping cart next to me in the supermarket. Well, if I was next to you and you were buying supplementary drinks I would either think you were trying to loose a few pounds, had someone sick at home, to lazy to cook or at the worst, had an eating disorder.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  26. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    ^ you would be bored out your mind and have diarrhea/constipation to contend with.
    I've been using for about 3 weeks now for dinner, and aren't bored of it yet, I look forward to each night. Its no worse than the rice and beef or chicken dish I used to make most evenings. On the bowle movements, its perfectly normall on the product, you still have just like do with regular food.

  27. #27

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    Diverting people from junk food/processed food etc. is a good thing. Re-directing them to supplementary drinks is not. Everything should be on the table but the key ingredient is moderation.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  28. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Gross.

    I love to cook, and I'm quite good at it. I can cook a tasty, nutritional meal in under a half hour for $10, and have leftovers for lunch the next day

    Can't say the idea of soylent is appealing in the least.
    When I was single and young, I could barely boil rice, but then after gaining weight and a health scare I had to learn to cook. I consider knowing how to cook basic meals in a reasonable amount of time one of the best life skills one could have.

  29. #29

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    ^Kudo's to you.
    Even stir-fry is a quick meal. Raw veggies, chicken/beef/pork/tofu thrown in with sauce of your choice. Can be made real fast and it's nutritional.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  30. #30

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    ^frying food creates carcionogens (just saying ). Nothing is perfect, and nothing is "right". I think Soylent is a valid option as part of a healthy diet and would help a lot of people, but to each their own. I won't stop cooking, eating or enjoying food, but its a lot less hassel now, and I'm a lot more sure I'm getting all the nutrients I need.
    Last edited by moahunter; 28-07-2015 at 04:58 PM.

  31. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    ^ you would be bored out your mind and have diarrhea/constipation to contend with.
    I've been using for about 3 weeks now for dinner, and aren't bored of it yet, I look forward to each night. Its no worse than the rice and beef or chicken dish I used to make most evenings. On the bowle movements, its perfectly normall on the product, you still have just like do with regular food.
    Why don't you just keep on making a meal in the evenings and take a good multiple vitamin each day. Not sure what you reason is for drinking this stuff. Is it to loose weight, are you sick or too lazy/tired to cook in the evening?.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  32. #32

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    ^a few reasons:

    1. Its cheaper
    2. I have reduced the meat I eat (meat consumption is linked to early death)
    3. Its quick / easy (this is important when I have a tough day at work, it removes the stress that leads to junk)
    4. Its allowed me to completely eliminate junk food
    5. I am on a "lean up" phase in my exercise program so it helps to calculate exact calories deficit.
    6. I beleive in the science, like the concept (my geeky side).

    Lets face it, telling people to cook and eat healthy has failed miserably in North America. If Soylent can help some people, I think its a good thing. But don't take my word for it, try it (or don't ).
    Last edited by moahunter; 28-07-2015 at 05:06 PM.

  33. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^frying food creates carcionogens (just saying ). Nothing is perfect, and nothing is "right". I think Soylent is a valid option as part of a healthy diet and would help a lot of people, but to each their own. I won't stop cooking, eating or enjoying food, but its a lot less hassel now, and I'm a lot more sure I'm getting all the nutrients I need.
    Frying food creates carcinogenics.
    Boy, some people will go to any lengths to prove a point.
    Are you a Soylent salesman.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  34. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Are you a Soylent salesman.
    Good idea, I should ask for a commission from them lol.

  35. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^a few reasons:

    1. Its cheaper
    2. I have reduced the meat I eat (meat consumption is linked to early death)
    3. Its quick / easy (this is important when I have a tough day at work, it removes the stress that leads to junk)
    4. Its allowed me to completely eliminate junk food
    5. I am on a "lean up" phase in my exercise program so it helps to calculate exact calories deficit.

    Lets face it, telling people to cook and eat healthy has failed miserably in North America. If Soylent can help some people, I think its a good thing. But don't take my word for it, try it (or don't ).
    So what have you substituted for not eating meat, tofu, lentils?.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  36. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    So what have you substituted for not eating meat, tofu, lentils?.
    Soylent has proteins from rice and other vegan sources, in the "exact" quantity you supposedly need.

  37. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Are you a Soylent salesman.
    Good idea, I should ask for a commission from them lol.
    If someone had of asked me what Soylent was I would have said paint thinner, cooking oil, denture fixative. It's not really an appealing name to me. Never heard of it until today. Heard of Boost, Ensure not Soylent.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  38. #38

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    ^the movie is cool in a sort of "B" cult way, Charleton Heston. I found it on youtube for free.

  39. #39

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    ^Stay off the stuff, due to that comment I think it's making you crazy.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  40. #40

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    It is awfully depressing to think this is something taken seriously.

    Food is so much more than about the basic nutrition it provides us. Every culture has massive celebrations and rituals around food because it's so important to our very beings. Even dieticians are starting to formally recognize that our rituals and attituds around eating are just as important, if not more important, than what we actually eat.

    We're omnivores, we're hardwired to search for food.Eating a variety of foods of different textures, colours, and tastes was the only way to ensure we got the nutrition we needed. It's likely our brains got so big and memories so good because we needed strategies to find it and to remember the ones that were edible and the ones that weren't.

  41. #41

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    ^we have basically evolved to buy the items with the most colourful packaging at the supermarket, based on what I see most people purchasing, and it has lead to an obesity epidemic. I'd rather a more scientific approach.

  42. #42
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    While I'm not interested in it myself I don't understand the self-righteous dismissal it gets from some. It's just another choice and there are many ways to sustain oneself. This seems ideal for busy people who don't really care about what they eat.

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

  43. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^we have basically evolved to buy the items with the most colourful packaging at the supermarket, based on what I see most people purchasing, and it has lead to an obesity epidemic. I'd rather a more scientific approach.
    I don't think this is really a solution. It's more of the same unnecessary shortcutting and just another layer of societal eating disorder. It's hubris to think a single supplement can actually contain all the nutrition a human needs. Can it sustain a human? No doubt, it doesn't take too much to do that. You could live a very long time off buttermilk and potatoes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Turnbull
    While I'm not interested in it myself I don't understand the self-righteous dismissal it gets from some. It's just another choice and there are many ways to sustain oneself. This seems ideal for busy people who don't really care about what they eat.
    To each their own.

  44. #44

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    The answer is to steer people towards better food choices and not food supplements.
    Not saying a food supplement is not helpful in some instances but it should not be used as a long term solution.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  45. #45
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    It's also not for *every* meal. I know I'm not a minority in that most of my meals are necessitated purely by hunger. They are not celebrations. It's getting enough fuel at your desk so that you can finish off the afternoon. Even on weekends, sometimes I'm simply hungry but because of an ever growing list of food aversions, I can't even think of something I would *like* to eat. I'm grateful that I have my jug of Schmilk (another version of the same concept) so I can keep going and feel healthy.

    According to the 2011 Census, about 25% of households are single-person. That's an awful lot of people whose meals are solitary affairs.

  46. #46

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    ^that's my thought too, I see this as just meeting nutritional needs, not preventing me from eating other food. I'd recommend trying this, you might like it, I like a good meal, but I like not cooking to. The two people in my office both now using it (man and woman), are both single.

    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Eyes View Post
    It's hubris to think a single supplement can actually contain all the nutrition a human needs. Can it sustain a human? No doubt, it doesn't take too much to do that. You could live a very long time off buttermilk and potatoes.
    I think the founder says it better than me, I'm not sure I agree with your assumption that it can't be nurtrionally "perfect" in and of itself, on a budget. Just because its different from your belief system, doesn't mean the science doesn't work:

    “Plants didn’t evolve to sustain humans, they evolved to sustain themselves. It’s really somewhat of a workaround that we’ve put so much work into agriculture and selective breeding,” he says. “What if we just looked at the specifics of what we need nutritionally and tried to get those directly? I find that a much more efficient process.”
    http://www.thestar.com/news/world/20...to-canada.html
    Last edited by moahunter; 28-07-2015 at 05:46 PM.

  47. #47

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    I don't eat a lot of red meat, mostly chicken, ham. Once in a while I think I should cut out meat altogether for three months just to see if I feel any different. What I would do to replace the protein I would be missing is to make lentil soups. Make a big batch in the slow cooker then freeze it in smaller portions. I don't think it would be on my radar to take a liquid supplement. More than likely I would take a vitamin pill.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  48. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^that's my thought too, I see this as just meeting nutritional needs, not preventing me from eating other food. I'd recommend trying this, you might like it, I like a good meal, but I like not cooking to. The two people in my office both now using it (man and woman), are both single.

    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Eyes View Post
    It's hubris to think a single supplement can actually contain all the nutrition a human needs. Can it sustain a human? No doubt, it doesn't take too much to do that. You could live a very long time off buttermilk and potatoes.
    I think the founder says it better than me, I'm not sure I agree with your assumption that it can't be nurtrionally "perfect" in and of itself, on a budget. Just because its different from your belief system, doesn't mean the science doesn't work:

    “Plants didn’t evolve to sustain humans, they evolved to sustain themselves. It’s really somewhat of a workaround that we’ve put so much work into agriculture and selective breeding,” he says. “What if we just looked at the specifics of what we need nutritionally and tried to get those directly? I find that a much more efficient process.”
    http://www.thestar.com/news/world/20...to-canada.html
    The assumption is that scientists already know everything about nutrition, and that's just not true. You said yourself people were passing out from not getting enough salt. Salt is one of the MOST understood nutrients. If that's overlooked, what about nutrients we don't really understand yet?

    Now granted if it's a one meal supplement a day, there's going to be no harm in that, assuming one has a balanced diet in one of the other meals of the day. One thing we know about food quite well is the healthiest diet is the "not too much" diet.

  49. #49

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    ^its a process of constant improvement (they are at verison 1.5), they had salt but it turned out the established nutritional science had it wrong on how much was needed. That they are actually monitoring people who are solely taking Soylent (there are thousands of guniea pigs) is pretty interesting, and that they are modifying the ingredients based on that, quite encouraging, especially if you use it as a supplement. Does anyone monitor the exact effects of KD, or Rago pasta sauce, or Lays potatoe chips? I know which, I'd trust more.
    Last edited by moahunter; 28-07-2015 at 06:00 PM.

  50. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^its a process of constant improvement (they are at verison 1.5), they had salt but it turned out the established nutritional science had it wrong on how much was needed. That they are actually monitoring people who are solely taking Soylent (there are thousands of guniea pigs) is pretty interesting, and that they are modifying the ingredients based on that, quite encouraging, especially if you use it as a supplement. Does anyone monitor the exact effects of KD, or Rago pasta sauce, or Lays potatoe chips? I know which, I'd trust more.
    Comparing a supplement to pre-processed products is a false dichotomy. Anyone can learn to make an acceptable macaroni dish or spaghetti sauce from scratch in just a few minutes.

  51. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^its a process of constant improvement (they are at verison 1.5), they had salt but it turned out the established nutritional science had it wrong on how much was needed. That they are actually monitoring people who are solely taking Soylent (there are thousands of guniea pigs) is pretty interesting, and that they are modifying the ingredients based on that, quite encouraging, especially if you use it as a supplement. Does anyone monitor the exact effects of KD, or Rago pasta sauce, or Lays potatoe chips? I know which, I'd trust more.
    I agree it's your choice to eat/drink what you want and you said you don't like cooking. Now, there are hundred of different salads you could eat. I'm not saying have salad for every meal but maybe for your supper. At least a different type of salad each night would be more interesting than the same boring liquid supplement. Salads with lots of veggies and low cal dressings vs liquid pap.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^frying food creates carcionogens (just saying ). Nothing is perfect, and nothing is "right". I think Soylent is a valid option as part of a healthy diet and would help a lot of people, but to each their own. I won't stop cooking, eating or enjoying food, but its a lot less hassel now, and I'm a lot more sure I'm getting all the nutrients I need.
    Frying food creates carcinogenics.
    Boy, some people will go to any lengths to prove a point.
    Are you a Soylent salesman.
    yeah... on an individual basis frying food creates carcinogens we need to be concerned about (even though our expected life spans continue to rist) while as an entire species we apparently don't make any substantial impact on climate change. the only thing mankind is responsible for is the evil sprawl developer turning our downtowns into doughnut holes. (just saying ).
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  53. #53
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    It's not a supplement. It really is actual food in the same sense that a bowl of oatmeal is actual food.

    But I always find it curious when people urge other people they know don't like cooking (I don't) to prepare things. I dislike salads and find managing fresh fruits and vegetables difficult. No matter what my good intentions when buying them I always wind up throwing their rotting corpses out. I can prepare macaroni and enjoy it, but I get sick of it quickly. Making the sauce from scratch? Why?

    Every so often I pull out the slow cooker and wend through my recipes to find something I can make. These days recipes have many ingredients but I go around and try to find them. And then I have to choke down what I just prepared because it just isn't right for reasons I can't determine. And by the time I've had the same awful meal for two weeks (I live alone) I'm done. It's back to delis for me.

  54. #54
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    But I'm not telling others to stop cooking. I don't get the thrill that people have of trying to amend the life habits of strangers.

  55. #55

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    ^Not sure if you have trouble cutting up fruits but there are fruits that don't need cutting. Grapes, blue berries, bananas. I have a vegetarian in the family and I make dishes for them in the slow cooker. I then freeze them into individual containers. You could try doing that with your different recipes. Cook 3 - 4 dishes in the slow cooker then freeze them into smaller batches. Could be a bit more variety for you.
    Myself, I find it to be real expensive to buy pre-packaged foods all the time. Once in a while it's O.K. for convenience but not a big fan of doing that too often. Mind, I do have more time to cook than most since I work from home and I don't mind cooking.
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  56. #56
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    Why?

  57. #57

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    Just trying to give you an alternative. No ulterior motive intended.
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  58. #58
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    Because you think this is the first time I've ever been involved in a conversation like this? And the first time I've ever been given this advice?

    I'm 62 years old, have always lived alone and think I've got my life pretty well figured out.

  59. #59

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    ^Hey It's a forum, we make comments, we offer advise. We barely know each other How the he!! am I supposed to know how much advice you have had or have taken or are open to or how much you just want to listen to the band. Cripes, I had never heard of Solyent until today, just goes to show you learn something new each day. Or maybe I do learn everyday and you have already figured it all out.
    Last edited by Gemini; 28-07-2015 at 06:53 PM.
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  60. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by EveB View Post
    Making the sauce from scratch? Why?
    Because it's cheap, delicious, quick to make, stores well, can be made from ingredients most people already carry in their cupboards, and you can control the amount of salt and leave out extra additives like sugar.

  61. #61
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    ^ And even with everything I said you still don't get it do you?

  62. #62

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    ^What is there to get?. You said you don't like to cook, implied you were not a good cook, said you were 62 lived alone and it's not your first rodeo then end up going to the deli anyway. People giving you tips on how to maybe get you a bit interested in cooking. You getting owly about it. What do you want us to say?.
    Have a Snickers Bar, you're not you when your hungry.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  63. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Have a Snickers Bar, you're not you when your hungry.
    Or eat a healthy alternative like Soylent. If everyone drank Soylent when needing a snack, instead of reaching for a snickers or lays, there would be a lot less obesity in Canada. Sure, they could reach for fruit too, but the reality is, they don't.

  64. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Have a Snickers Bar, you're not you when your hungry.
    Or eat a healthy alternative like Soylent. If everyone drank Soylent when needing a snack, instead of reaching for a snickers or lays, there would be a lot less obesity in Canada. Sure, they could reach for fruit too, but the reality is, they don't.
    If everyone kept some cut up vegetables and hummus in the fridge and reached for that when needing a snack..or if everyone worked an extra 30 minutes of exercise into their lifestyle..or if everyone did X or Y or Z. The obesity epidemic is a lot more complicated than one food or activity.

  65. #65

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    ^Agreed, but the reality is, some people don't like looking for healthy food in a supermarket (they would rather grab the lays and the snickers). Its fine for you to say, "I avoid all these foods, and get the healthy stuff, so you should to", but that messeging, like it or not, has failed miserably. For me, Soylent means I can spend a lot less time in the Supermarket, and when I do go, its just for a few basic items (some fruit / carrots for lunch, bit of cheese, and some eggs, and bread (spoil myself for breakfast) and nuts). I like that, my wasted time is limited, yet I can have a healthy complete diet, to go with my exercise.

  66. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Have a Snickers Bar, you're not you when your hungry.
    Or eat a healthy alternative like Soylent. If everyone drank Soylent when needing a snack, instead of reaching for a snickers or lays, there would be a lot less obesity in Canada. Sure, they could reach for fruit too, but the reality is, they don't.
    Oh, FFS. You might not be a Soylent salesman but I'm wondering if you get a $1 for every time you mention it. Next thing we know you will be bathing in it.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Have a Snickers Bar, you're not you when your hungry.
    Or eat a healthy alternative like Soylent. If everyone drank Soylent when needing a snack, instead of reaching for a snickers or lays, there would be a lot less obesity in Canada. Sure, they could reach for fruit too, but the reality is, they don't.
    Oh, FFS. You might not be a Soylent salesman but I'm wondering if you get a $1 for every time you mention it. Next thing we know you will be bathing in it.
    What's wrong with mentioning Soylent in a thread about Soylent?

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

  68. #68

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    'Health is more than body size'; Don't use scale to measure health, experts say



    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/healt...544/story.html
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  69. #69
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    Ugh, not a fan of this new HAES thing. Yes, overweight people can still be perfectly healthy. But the fact is, is that a wide variety of diseases and conditions are more prevalent/likely when you're overweight, and those rates go up with weight. So sorry, no, someone who weighs 400 lbs is not healthy at that size. Not for the long term, even if they feel fine at the moment. Whether it's heart disease, diabetes, joint/back/leg/foot issues or whatever, being massively obese like that is bad for your health. Full stop.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3995323/

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-...b_1967677.html

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^Agreed, but the reality is, some people don't like looking for healthy food in a supermarket (they would rather grab the lays and the snickers). Its fine for you to say, "I avoid all these foods, and get the healthy stuff, so you should to", but that messeging, like it or not, has failed miserably. For me, Soylent means I can spend a lot less time in the Supermarket, and when I do go, its just for a few basic items (some fruit / carrots for lunch, bit of cheese, and some eggs, and bread (spoil myself for breakfast) and nuts). I like that, my wasted time is limited, yet I can have a healthy complete diet, to go with my exercise.
    I enjoy cooking too much to even consider something like Soylent, but can understand its allure. I mean I like pablum and all, but can and do choose to buy healthy groceries and take the time (and enjoyment) to put them together to form healthy delicious meals.
    www.decl.org

    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

  71. #71

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    Another way to look at it: Cut $75-100,000 off the cost of a house/renovation and eat out more. Hmm. How many a young couple's homemade meals are actually built into their 25 years of future mortgage payments - which are mostly interest for the first 20 or so years? They've mortgaged their future in order to eat at home.

    With more neighbourhood restaurants and cafes and lower cost / alternative foods, I could sure see reducing the size and cost of kitchens. Get out and walk for your food.

  72. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Have a Snickers Bar, you're not you when your hungry.
    Or eat a healthy alternative like Soylent. If everyone drank Soylent when needing a snack, instead of reaching for a snickers or lays, there would be a lot less obesity in Canada. Sure, they could reach for fruit too, but the reality is, they don't.
    Oh, FFS. You might not be a Soylent salesman but I'm wondering if you get a $1 for every time you mention it. Next thing we know you will be bathing in it.
    What's wrong with mentioning Soylent in a thread about Soylent?
    Look what soylent did to Charton Heston!


    This is also a classic...
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9IKVj4l5GU4



    ~
    Last edited by KC; 03-08-2015 at 08:16 AM.

  73. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Another way to look at it: Cut $75-100,000 off the cost of a house/renovation and eat out more. Hmm. How many a young couple's homemade meals are actually built into their 25 years of future mortgage payments - which are mostly interest for the first 20 or so years? They've mortgaged their future in order to eat at home.

    With more neighbourhood restaurants and cafes and lower cost / alternative foods, I could sure see reducing the size and cost of kitchens. Get out and walk for your food.
    When my wife to be and I were courting in Manhattan we ate out all the time, and most folks we knew did the same: no vehicles and tiny galley kitchens. We'd go for morning coffee and breakfast (many cheap and good places), often something with alcohol for lunch (beer and a sandwich), a snack in the later afternoon (leftover sandwich), then drinks with an 8 or 9-ish dinner out. NYC is a great dining out city, variety and tasty things in all price brackets. Many Manhattanites easily dispose of their income, mind you there's a large single demographic.

  74. #74

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    ^the "problem" with eating out, is you don't know what you are getting. A lot of resturants lace their food with massive quantities of fat, salt and sugars (keeps people coming back). Anything tastes good if you stick enough salt in it. I like to eat out, but I save it mostly for work events or dates now. When I spent time in Singapore, this sort of lifestyle of eating out every day was comon there, you could get a meal for $2 or $3, so most people just ate out (economies of scale I guess).

    http://globalnews.ca/news/2129802/fa...our-waistline/

    Turns out, those who ate at a restaurant were taking in more healthy nutrients, such as vitamins, potassium and omega-3 fatty acids than those who ate at home or at a fast food restaurant, but those benefits are cancelled out by all of the fat, sodium and cholesterol they were also getting from their meals.

    The difference was “substantial” – an extra intake of 58 milligrams of cholesterol, 10 grams more of total fat, and 3.49 more grams of saturated fat compared to their counterparts who ate at home.

    Those who ate at a fast food chain added about 300 milligrams of sodium per day to their daily intake while a restaurant bumped the salt up by 412 milligrams per day, on average.

    Ultimately, restaurant fare also tacked on an extra 200 calories to your waistline.
    Last edited by moahunter; 04-08-2015 at 08:46 AM. Reason: Resturant food worse than fast food

  75. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^the "problem" with eating out, is you don't know what you are getting. A lot of resturants lace their food with massive quantities of fat, salt and sugars (keeps people coming back). Anything tastes good if you stick enough salt in it. I like to eat out, but I save it mostly for work events or dates now. When I spent time in Singapore, this sort of lifestyle of eating out every day was comon there, you could get a meal for $2 or $3, so most people just ate out (economies of scale I guess).

    http://globalnews.ca/news/2129802/fa...our-waistline/

    Turns out, those who ate at a restaurant were taking in more healthy nutrients, such as vitamins, potassium and omega-3 fatty acids than those who ate at home or at a fast food restaurant, but those benefits are cancelled out by all of the fat, sodium and cholesterol they were also getting from their meals.

    The difference was “substantial” – an extra intake of 58 milligrams of cholesterol, 10 grams more of total fat, and 3.49 more grams of saturated fat compared to their counterparts who ate at home.

    Those who ate at a fast food chain added about 300 milligrams of sodium per day to their daily intake while a restaurant bumped the salt up by 412 milligrams per day, on average.

    Ultimately, restaurant fare also tacked on an extra 200 calories to your waistline.
    Interesting about the nutrients. I've always thought that those who eat at home settle down to living off just a few repetitive choices out of habit and likely suffer from suboptimal diets. Buying at places like Costco just worsen the situation by loading up a household with massive boxes of cereal etc.

  76. #76

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    I am a Costco shopper and buy in bulk as much as possible. If I buy meat products such pork chops, hamburger meat, chicken breasts, shrimp etc: I split them up into smaller portions then freeze them. Every day I make something different. One day chicken curry, next day shrimp stir fry etc. although I do have time to do this. I think one of the problems with meals is that both parents work and it's easier to make meals that just need throwing in the oven for 30 mins. Who wants to be at work all day then have to start a meal from scratch for their family although doing this is a way better alternative than throwing some powder in a blender then adding water then drinking it. Drinking your food is not the answer, drinking one type of food is even less of an answer. If a person feels they are not getting enough nutrients a good multi vitamin & mineral pill would work just as well.
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  77. #77
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    ^ This is why home ec should be mandatory in our schools.

    People don't realize how easy it is to make healthy, cheap, tasty meals from scratch with a little bit of preparation.

    If you plan your week out and do an hour of prep on Sunday, you won't spend more than 30 minutes a day making a nice meal. If you like leftovers, you could cook three times a week.

    The problem is that people don't know how to cook, shop, or plan.

  78. #78

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    ^I know how to cook simple quick healthy meals, I know how to make Soylent to though, and I know which I prefer. I still make myself a good breakfast with plenty of protein, and take fruit and vegetables for lunch. I've found I've had some decent exercise gains towards my goal since converting my dinners to Soylent, I'm able to control better my current cut without being as hungry.

    ^^There's quite a bit of evidence that vitamin/mineral pills are pretty much useless, over half of Candians already take them, but people are still getting cancer, heart disease etc. (mind you, no matter how healthy you live, we all end up dieing). Soylent is a bit different as it is actual food converted into powerdered form, much of the ingredients are potatoe and rice based.
    Last edited by moahunter; 04-08-2015 at 11:37 AM.

  79. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaerdo View Post
    ^ This is why home ec should be mandatory in our schools.

    People don't realize how easy it is to make healthy, cheap, tasty meals from scratch with a little bit of preparation.

    If you plan your week out and do an hour of prep on Sunday, you won't spend more than 30 minutes a day making a nice meal. If you like leftovers, you could cook three times a week.

    The problem is that people don't know how to cook, shop, or plan.
    Lot of truth in what you say. With preparation most people could make good meals every day of the week. On Saturday or Sunday set aside some time to slice or cube meat for stir fry's. Make a couple of pasta's for the freezers etc. Slice the veggies so they are ready for a wok or steamer. The more someone does this the faster a person gets at it. On a rainy day a person could do prep for a whole month of meals. Thing is getting people to buy into that. Make them realize they are not only eating healthier but are saving a lot of money by not eating out or getting take outs as often.
    I think a great wedding gift would be basic prep and cooking skills and an hour or two with a financial adviser.
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  80. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^I know how to cook simple quick healthy meals, I know how to make Soylent to though, and I know which I prefer. I still make myself a good breakfast with plenty of protein, and take fruit and vegetables for lunch. I've found I've had some decent exercise gains towards my goal since converting my dinners to Soylent, I'm able to control better my current cut without being as hungry.

    ^^There's quite a bit of evidence that vitamin/mineral pills are pretty much useless, over half of Candians already take them, but people are still getting cancer, heart disease etc. (mind you, no matter how healthy you live, we all end up dieing). Soylent is a bit different as it is actual food converted into powerdered form, much of the ingredients are potatoe and rice based.
    Eating out, by getting out, provides vitamin D the natural way. . We need more sidewalk cafes.

  81. #81

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    Learning to cook and eating cheap and healthy is about learning some basic skills and nutrition, and figuring out what works for you. Being open-minded helps too. It's also not all or nothing. Not every meal has to home-cooked, or be worthy of a Michelin star restaurant. Building habits is what it's important. Shortcuts and tips like buying a roast chicken or a bagged salad (but make your own dressing), keeping around some previously prepared frozen meals, canned/frozen vegetables and quick-cook proteins (fastfry steaks and porkchops, chicken thighs, frozen shrimp, etc.), can save you time or help when you're in a pinch. Omelettes, pastas, and stir frys are an example of food that are cheap, can be made quickly, and a good good way of using up leftovers or using whatever you have on hand.

    You don't need to spend a fortune on equipment, but a good Chef's knife is a must, as is owning a basic variety of pots and pans and some other basic equipment that can be bought pretty cheaply. I bought my knife at a restaurant supplies store for $30, and as long as it's cleaned and sharpened, it's as good as a knife ten times that price.

    When I learned to cook I bought this Calgary-based writer's book:
    http://www.amazon.ca/Starting-Out-Es.../dp/1552857069



    I found it helpful and still use many of the recipes. There are many books like this all more or less the same, so find one that has recipes that seem to speak to you and start there.

    I also find youtube videos helpful, especially when it's learning technique. Jamie Oliver has some good videos and shows, and a good website (http://www.jamieoliver.com). He straddles between Celebrity Chef and cooking teacher, so take it with a grain of salt (and cut down on the salt & oil), but he has a slapdash approach that is good for homecooking.

  82. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^I know how to cook simple quick healthy meals, I know how to make Soylent to though, and I know which I prefer. I still make myself a good breakfast with plenty of protein, and take fruit and vegetables for lunch. I've found I've had some decent exercise gains towards my goal since converting my dinners to Soylent, I'm able to control better my current cut without being as hungry.

    ^^There's quite a bit of evidence that vitamin/mineral pills are pretty much useless, over half of Candians already take them, but people are still getting cancer, heart disease etc. (mind you, no matter how healthy you live, we all end up dieing). Soylent is a bit different as it is actual food converted into powerdered form, much of the ingredients are potatoe and rice based.
    Eating out, by getting out, provides vitamin D the natural way. . We need more sidewalk cafes.
    If people understand ONE thing -- just one thing -- about modern food it's that we are hardwired to want salt, fat, and sugar. These are extremely necessary to our survival in small quantities, which is why we crave them so much, but become problematic in larger quantities. Restaurants and food processors push our buttons by putting as much of these in their food as possible.

  83. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    I am a Costco shopper and buy in bulk as much as possible.
    Costco doesn't really work for me here, although we used it a lot more when we lived in a community that doesn't have the options we have here. Regardless of where you shop, most of the foods you buy should be bought on the "peripherals" of the store, where most of the unprocessed and minimally processed foods are. I know I'm stereotyping, but on average, new immigrants, especially Asian families, are way, way better shoppers and healthier eaters than naturalized Canadians. If you want to know what you should be eating, pay attention to their grocery carts more.

  84. #84

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    I remember a few years back I was watching Oprah Winfrey. Now I know she has millions in cash and she can afford her own personal chef but she stated on her show that she did not cook. She said it in a way like 'me, cook, no way and I don't know how to'. She said it in such a way that it seems she was almost proud of it. I've heard regular people say the same thing. Like cooking is some kind of awful chore like cleaning out the cat litter or emptying the RV toilet. Or 'I'm too much of a princess to cook'. To me that's such a poor attitude if you have a family to feed. I think the more a person gives cooking a chance the more they get to like it. Food is a science but it's not a rocket science. I have had more spectacular dishes at pot luck suppers than I have had a restaurant buffets. Food can be just as flavorful with 4 ingredients as it can with 44. Unless you have digestive problems and cannot eat solid food there is a sunami of foods out their for anyone trying to eat sensible and loose weight. at the same time.
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  85. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Eyes View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    I am a Costco shopper and buy in bulk as much as possible.
    Costco doesn't really work for me here, although we used it a lot more when we lived in a community that doesn't have the options we have here. Regardless of where you shop, most of the foods you buy should be bought on the "peripherals" of the store, where most of the unprocessed and minimally processed foods are. I know I'm stereotyping, but on average, new immigrants, especially Asian families, are way, way better shoppers and healthier eaters than naturalized Canadians. If you want to know what you should be eating, pay attention to their grocery carts more.
    I can agree with you on Asian people eating a healthy diet, but it appears more younger Asians are being westernized and now starting
    to become overweight. Even the Asians in Asia that live in the big cities are eating more western food.
    One big problem is junk food, chips, chocolate, cookies, savoury snacks etc. etc. Some people consume more calories eating snacks than they do eating their regular meals. Foods are too tempting and will power is not in great supply.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  86. #86

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Eyes View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    I am a Costco shopper and buy in bulk as much as possible.
    Costco doesn't really work for me here, although we used it a lot more when we lived in a community that doesn't have the options we have here. Regardless of where you shop, most of the foods you buy should be bought on the "peripherals" of the store, where most of the unprocessed and minimally processed foods are. I know I'm stereotyping, but on average, new immigrants, especially Asian families, are way, way better shoppers and healthier eaters than naturalized Canadians. If you want to know what you should be eating, pay attention to their grocery carts more.
    I can agree with you on Asian people eating a healthy diet, but it appears more younger Asians are being westernized and now starting
    to become overweight. Even the Asians in Asia that live in the big cities are eating more western food.
    One big problem is junk food, chips, chocolate, cookies, savoury snacks etc. etc. Some people consume more calories eating snacks than they do eating their regular meals. Foods are too tempting and will power is not in great supply.
    I agree with that. Obesity in China is exploding, and I'm sure we've all seen students (of all cultures) have shopping carts filled with nothing but insant ramen noodles, so I don't want to generalize too much.

  87. #87
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    ^ $1 for 400 calories of spicy noodles is a steal. I eat healthy but still love a cheap ramen bowl from time to time.

  88. #88

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaerdo View Post
    ^ $1 for 400 calories of spicy noodles is a steal. I eat healthy but still love a cheap ramen bowl from time to time.
    Well once in awhile is fine, but it has much nutrition as a bag of doritos. If you're in the extreme minority who needs cheap calories, you can always eat straight up lard.

  89. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    I think the more a person gives cooking a chance the more they get to like it.
    I've taught elementary and junior high aged kids cooking, and if there's one thing they all have in common, it's they're extremely proud of what they made. Even the simple baked chocolate chip cookie is a million times more wonderful when you make it yourself.

    I think the rise of the celebrity chef and food television has sort of added to the allure and mythology of cooking, that it's this complicated laborious process only done well by Gordon Ramsay types and genius neurotics with twitchy hands and handle-bar mustaches.

    In reality, restaurant cooking is a completely different game than home cooking with different constraints and goals. A brilliant chef is not necessarily a good home cook and vice versa.

  90. #90

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    One of my favorite shows is American Test Kitchen. They sometimes explain the science of food. Like what has to happen for sauces to thicken, for food to rise, why you have to turn down the heat, what not to mix together, why you add the eggs first etc. Most T.V. chefs just show you how to cook the recipe and give you no hints or info why you have to do certain things.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  91. #91

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    I've been away but I'll jump in here:

    Food is fuel. Nothing more.

    Dining is entertainment. Every food company knows this. It's called "eatertainment". Watch a food commercial and you'll see what I mean. That the general public has bought into it is clear - just look at the rampant obesity. Food marketers have changed food from fuel into an excessive hobby.

    I've been considering trying Soylent, and after a few revisions I think it's time to try. Cooking bores me and the mess it is annoying. If I want eatertainment, which I do enjoy, I'll hit up a restaurant or host a BBQ. My body doesn't need that every day. It just needs fuel.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  92. #92

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    I don't think it was too difficult for food marketers to get the public on board on the 'food is entertainment' concept. People have been gathering round to eat food since tribes were first formed thousands of years ago. It's just in the last 100 years or so that they have kicked it up a notch to make food part of the 'going out and having fun' experience. Years ago a lot of people just ate out if it was a special occasion. A marriage, a birth, a death, a graduation etc. Now no reason is needed.
    Sure a body needs 'fuel' to function. We are humans and not cars. Most humans thrive on variety. There's nothing like biting into a fresh baked loaf with butter on it. Tasting the sweet and sour of chicken, the squirt of ketchup on a frank, the pleasure of lasagne, the sweetness of fresh fruit, the snap of green beans. The list is endless. To be drinking some green slush for any length of time would just be mind numbingly boring. After a hard days work it's not much to look forward at the end of the day.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  93. #93

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    Variety - that's a good word. I like eating the same thing day in day out so I can experience variety by doing different things every day, instead of the mind numbing boringness of cooking and cleaning every single evening.

    Each to their own, right?
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  94. #94
    C2E Long Term Contributor
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    Exactly.
    www.decl.org

    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

  95. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    Each to their own, right?
    Agreed. I think Soylent is an option that could help a lot of people, but its not for everyone. I'm quite surprised how many people seem genuinley offended by the concept, one of kickstarter crowdfunding's biggest succeses - originally driven by a lot of Californian geeks who like the science of it / see food as fuel - think, the Sheldon's of this world (but now going more mainstream). It seems some people believe that if you choose this option as part of your diet, it means you are lazy, incapable of cooking, a threat to the food industry, a threat to civilized society (oh no, there are people who don't derive much pleasure from eating), or similar. But, you could as easily write just as scathing judgement about most of the population today who are addicted to processesed and junk foods - when you look at obesity rates. There is no "right" or "wrong" way to eat, the "fuel" you consume (processed, not processed, eat out, eat in, solylent...) determines lots of things, sure its a major factor in your health and well being, and for many its a big part of their social lives, but not everyone has the same goals or concerns about the risk of shortning or extending their lives by a few years.
    Last edited by moahunter; 05-08-2015 at 07:57 AM.

  96. #96

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    Isn't "home cooking" as shown in most 'cookbooks' essentially creating home made processed foods? Add a ton of sugar, spices, flour or whatever and mix it together and you end up with - processed foods.



    Even with simple meals, nutritionally, I just don't see a lot of difference between a McDonald's hamburger and a home bbq'd steak and potato and extras.

    However, a meal minimizing the meats and breads and adding a variety of vegetables, berries, etc. to me added more nutritional diversity to one's diet. No fancy cookbooks required.
    Last edited by KC; 05-08-2015 at 12:23 PM.

  97. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Isn't "home cooking" as shown in most 'cookbooks' essentially creating home made processed foods? Add a ton of sugar, spices, flour or whatever and mix it together and you end up with - processed foods.


    Sure..except you are using quality ingredients. And you're not adding a ton of fat, salt & sugar as preservatives and to mask your poor quality ingredients.

    Even with simple meals, nutritionally, I just don't see a lot of difference between a McDonald's hamburger and a home bbq'd steak and potato and extras.
    Well for starters, nobody should be eating steak dinners every night, but at least with a steak dinner you will feel full and more satisfied after eating it. And if you use a moderate amount of meat, lay off the sour cream and other fats on your potatoes, and have lightly dressed vegetables as your side, it's still reasonably healthy.

  98. #98

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    I'm not offended by Soylent or threatened by it. I just think..it's ridiculous. 1) Nutritional science is still a developing science and we don't know the longterm effects of a restricted diet like this 2) In any case, everyone is a little different and has different needs 3) It's simply wrong that food is just fuel. The military and NASA have experimented with using food supplements, but the reason they give soldiers and astronauts real food-like things is because it has such a strong psychological effect that affects their morale and well-being. 4) It's not cheaper. YOu can go along way on a food budget if you restrict it to beans, grains, and vegetables.

  99. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Eyes View Post
    It's simply wrong that food is just fuel. The military and NASA have experimented with using food supplements, but the reason they give soldiers and astronauts real food-like things is because it has such a strong psychological effect that affects their morale and well-being.
    I just had a business lunch at a fine resturant, I had beef tenderloin and a roast pepper soup. It was nice, the conversation was good. But, I could have had good conversation without the food. I feel no more full or satisified right now, than I will after having two glasses of Soylent tonight. Food is fuel for me, unlike your astronauts, I don't feel psychologically damaged each night.

  100. #100

    Default

    ^I've read a lot of your posts, the jury is still out on the psychologically damaged aspect.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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