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Thread: Repeat that in Canadian please....

  1. #1
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    Default Repeat that in Canadian please....

    Many of the words we use can be confusing to other English speakers


    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/life/...422/story.html
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    Here's a link to the actual article:

    55 Canadianisms You May Not Know or Are Using Differently
    http://geekmom.com/2013/12/55-canadianisms/
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    That's a great article. Funny too! #8 offensive milk!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    Here's a link to the actual article:

    55 Canadianisms You May Not Know or Are Using Differently
    http://geekmom.com/2013/12/55-canadianisms/
    What a bizarre article. Appart from the Canadian brand names and booze bottle sizes most of these so say Canadianisms are common place English terms. Still, if it makes Canadians feel special to imagine they're unique to their "culture"...
    "The only really positive thing one could say about Vancouver is, it’s not the rest of Canada." Oink (britishexpats.com)

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    ^ ...but you're not going to add to our body of knowledge by correcting the record? Still, if it makes you feel... Which are uniquely Canadian?

    Canadian English
    Dane Jurcic, 2003

    Excerpts:
    "There are approximately two thousand words or expressions that are native to Canada, or which have a meaning peculiar to or characteristics of Canada. The latter words and expressions are referred to as Canadianisms. The term Canadianisms can also be extended to include words borrowed from other languages which do not appear in other varieties of English. "

    "Orkin in his book Speaking Canadian English in comparing Canadian English to American and British English states: “the truth seems to be that Canadians are not prolific coiners of words, being content for the most part to borrow American and British English expressions, inventing new words sparsely and reluctantly…” (69)."...

    http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~cper...362Jurcic2.htm


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    Last edited by KC; 01-01-2014 at 07:18 AM.

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    ^ Evolution, I suppose, but this sentence in that piece made me look up:

    "Indeed, eh? appears to be in general use wherever English speakers hand (sic) their hats; and in one form or another it has been in general use for centuries” (95)."


    Having grown up and lived in England for 35 years, I'd have to say that 'eh?' was very rarely used. Now, thirty years on, Brits tend to use 'yeah?' in the same way as Canadians use 'eh?'. To me, the British 'yeah?' seemingly tacked on to far more phrases or statements than necessary, comes across as a slovenly use of language. Canadians using 'eh?' somehow seems more acceptable to my ears. Weird, eh/yeah/huh/innit?
    Last edited by howie; 01-01-2014 at 05:02 PM.
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    I'm still trying to indoctrinate my wife into using the word tuque, not sure if she'll ever use bunny hug (I use the term hoodie too).

    The nice thing about Canadian English is that is a mixture of British and American with a smattering for French (poutine for example). As for donair vs. gyro both can be accurate depending on if you're Turkish or Greek.

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    Growing up here I remember one relative that would use "eh" all the time and it really stood out in my ears because it just wasn't very commonly used in my experience. So it also seemed odd and unfair for Americans to poke fun at all Canadians for saying it. I do hear it a lot more now in Edmonton though.

    Interestingly, I haven't encountered, or I no longer recognize the southern Alberta accent (among some but not all southern Albertans there was had a slight drawl maybe from American lineage) or the eastern Canadian-Toronto and area, accents anymore.

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    Never noticed a north/south divide in accent here. What is true though, is how some vowel sounds soften from east to west. Not just in Canada, but in the U.S., Britain, and possibly in other countries I'm assuming as I speak no other languages. Just as an example, the 'a' in the word 'car' has a hard edge in the maritimes compared with softer 'a' sound here. This has always puzzled me.
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    Many rural folks on the prairies speak in a distinctly flat but clipped manner...listen to PC MLA Doug Horner, former Oiler coach Ron Low or many rodeo guys as examples.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Growing up here I remember one relative that would use "eh" all the time and it really stood out in my ears because it just wasn't very commonly used in my experience. So it also seemed odd and unfair for Americans to poke fun at all Canadians for saying it. I do hear it a lot more now in Edmonton though.

    Interestingly, I haven't encountered, or I no longer recognize the southern Alberta accent (among some but not all southern Albertans there was had a slight drawl maybe from American lineage) or the eastern Canadian-Toronto and area, accents anymore.
    It's amazing given the size and diversity of Canada just how samey the accent is right across the country. That flat, whinny monotone with the upward inflected "eh" at the end of the statement seems to be the default setting apart from among some younger people who self consciously cultivate the cod Californian accent.
    Last edited by expat; 03-01-2014 at 03:39 AM.
    "The only really positive thing one could say about Vancouver is, it’s not the rest of Canada." Oink (britishexpats.com)

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    Very cool. When touring with a few American artists this past summer they looked at me like an alien when I explained what a toque was haha. They had never even heard the word before.

    I didnt realize that "Mickey" was a Canadian liquor slang. Also interesting is a "Texas Mickey" being a Canadian thing
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    I was watching a movie about a week ago, typical Hollywood one, and they used the word tuque in it, now I'm wracking my brain trying to think which movie.

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    I still don't hear people saying eh or oot here. Regarding the eh's, maybe it's the lack of French Canadians here.


    BBC - Culture - Why is Canadian English unique?


    "Another feature is the ‘low back merger’, which makes caught and cot sound the same. Following on this is what is called the “Canadian vowel shift”, whereby bit sounds a bit like bet, bet sounds a bit like bat, and bat is said a bit farther back in the mouth. This shift is still in progress. These changes seem to have originated in Canada, though similar patterns can be seen in some parts of the US."

    ...
    "These Canadianisms stand as evidence of the difference between Canadian and American culture. It is very important for Canadians to maintain that difference, even if people from Vancouver sound more like people from San Francisco than people from San Francisco sound like people from San Antonio. Though English-speaking Canadians remain loyal to the Queen, they aren’t truly interested in being British or sounding British; they’re just interested in using the British connection to assert their independence from the independent United States, which they left because they didn’t want to leave. An ambivalent situation indeed."

    http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/201...english-unique

    On great vowel shifts...

    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    The value of proper grammar is a moot point.

    This was interesting:

    Sunday School: The Great Vowel Shift
    Sunday, February 3, 2013

    "If you have ever wondered why there seems to be no semblance of logic to the way English words are spelled or pronounced, you might like to know that there is an explanation. It's just that Michael Enright has never really understood it. It's called The Great Vowel Shift, and that's the subject of today's Sunday School with Michael Enright.
    Michael speaks to Jack Chambers, a professor of linguistics at the University of Toronto. Professor Chambers could just as easily deliver a lesson on the music of Miles Davis...which some people find even more mysterious than The Great Vowel Shift. "
    http://www.cbc.ca/thesundayedition/s...t-vowel-shift/


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    http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/forum...reply&p=511501
    Last edited by KC; 23-08-2015 at 08:41 AM.

  15. #15

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    BBC - Culture - How Americans preserved British English

    “So do Canadians west of Quebec – ...”

    http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/201...ritish-english


    More:

    How the English language became such a mess
    http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/201...uage-is-sinful


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    Last edited by KC; 08-02-2018 at 07:31 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    I still don't hear people saying eh or oot here. Regarding the eh's, maybe it's the lack of French Canadians here.


    BBC - Culture - Why is Canadian English unique?


    "Another feature is the ‘low back merger’, which makes caught and cot sound the same. Following on this is what is called the “Canadian vowel shift”, whereby bit sounds a bit like bet, bet sounds a bit like bat, and bat is said a bit farther back in the mouth. This shift is still in progress. These changes seem to have originated in Canada, though similar patterns can be seen in some parts of the US."

    ...
    "These Canadianisms stand as evidence of the difference between Canadian and American culture. It is very important for Canadians to maintain that difference, even if people from Vancouver sound more like people from San Francisco than people from San Francisco sound like people from San Antonio. Though English-speaking Canadians remain loyal to the Queen, they aren’t truly interested in being British or sounding British; they’re just interested in using the British connection to assert their independence from the independent United States, which they left because they didn’t want to leave. An ambivalent situation indeed."

    http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/201...english-unique

    On great vowel shifts...

    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    The value of proper grammar is a moot point.

    This was interesting:

    Sunday School: The Great Vowel Shift
    Sunday, February 3, 2013

    "If you have ever wondered why there seems to be no semblance of logic to the way English words are spelled or pronounced, you might like to know that there is an explanation. It's just that Michael Enright has never really understood it. It's called The Great Vowel Shift, and that's the subject of today's Sunday School with Michael Enright.
    Michael speaks to Jack Chambers, a professor of linguistics at the University of Toronto. Professor Chambers could just as easily deliver a lesson on the music of Miles Davis...which some people find even more mysterious than The Great Vowel Shift. "
    http://www.cbc.ca/thesundayedition/s...t-vowel-shift/


    .
    http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/forum...reply&p=511501
    I actually say 'eh' quite a bit. Never did when I arrived here, but then my hearing has declined somewhat over the years.
    Nisi Dominus Frustra

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    A couple of years back my daughter was coming back on a U.K. flight and she was sitting next to this girl maybe a couple of years or so older than her. They got talking and my daughter said the girl had a real broad English accent. Like, 'whots up' and 'I met a laddie' etc. My daughter asked her if she was going to Canada on holiday. The girl said no and that she was born in Canada. She had 'met this laddie' on line and had been on two weeks holiday and was going back to somewhere near Flin Flon, Manitoba. Some people can do that, pick accents real fast.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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