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Thread: Old Computer Technology

  1. #1

    Default Old Computer Technology

    Thought I would open a discussion about old computer technology that would talk about the "good all days" of computers. I still remember the computer students in high school that walked around with a shirt pocket full of carefully sorted IBM punch cards.



    http://cacm.acm.org/news/146306-if-i...today/fulltext


    Here is an example of the price of storage from an old Radio Shack catalog that I had. Compare what a 2 TB drive costs today and what that would be worth back then.


    My brother was older than me and he was the first student at the UofA to have a pocket calculator. He bought the Sinclair, it had add, subtract, divide, multiply and square root functions; not even a memory key and it cost more than a year's tuition in Engineering back in the early 70's. He was not allowed to use it on tests as the professors said that they were a fad and that they would never replace a slide rule.


    devildogdailynews.blogspot.com
    Slide Rule
    Last edited by Edmonton PRT; 11-03-2014 at 10:53 AM.
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    I was watching Flight of the Navigator with my step-daughter the thing that amazed her was the size of the Motorola "brick" phones in that movie.
    http://starwinar.files.wordpress.com...__470x3620.jpg

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    Ahhh, the good old days!


    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

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    Around 1979/1980 my brother and I were the coolest kids on the block because our father bought this for his work:



    It took forever to upload a program using the cassette recorder. But it was worth it playing dot matrix chess and an X vs.0 football game.

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    My slide rule from when I enrolled in Engineering in 1971 still sits on top of my computer box. I never really used it because of my visual deficit (I used log tables instead), but it still brings back fond memories.

    Oh, and cats, punch cards and coffee tables are not a good combo.

    Eve

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    Post your website links please! or I expect admin to delete these posts.
    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

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    It's really amazing how technoclogy has advanced. Just yesterday I bought a 32 Gig memory card for my camera. It's about the size of a postage stamp.
    Fly Edmonton first. Support EIA

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    The games were awesome too!




    And every time I hear Castle Wolfenstein I think this:


    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by 24karat View Post
    It's really amazing how technoclogy has advanced. Just yesterday I bought a 32 Gig memory card for my camera. It's about the size of a postage stamp.
    When I was in the US last week, I picked up the latest SanDisk - Ultra 128GB SDXC Class 10 Memory Card for $125

    http://www.bestbuy.com/site/ultra-12...=buyingOptions


    Compared to this,
    My image

    My SD card has 8,500 times the storage and would be comparatively worth more than $20M
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  10. #10

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    I learned programming around 1983 on the IBM or Amdahl mainframe at the U of A that ran something called the Michigan Terminal System.

    (The first shot is the terminals. The second shot is of hardware that I never got to see, but I do remember the set of operating manuals in each terminal room in the old General Services Building and Assiniboia Hall -- that's the volume above -- I think it may have been actually the thickest single book in the world.)


    http://terminals.classiccmp.org/wiki...n_AJ_510-1.jpg



    (http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/gallery/pic/ibm67d.jpg)

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    When I started my word processing service (after several years of using typewriters), I got me a Kaypro II which I used until it cratered. After that, to keep me working, the professors I was working for gave me their accounts so I could work in the computer rooms. I was doing math typesetting using LaTeX on terminals similar to the previous post and batching them into the processing room so that I could get dot matrix feeds in my box.

    Eve

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    I remember working in Ontario in the late 80's where we had a computer room with an old (1973) ICL computer with Singer sewing machine company software. The disk drive was a 3' x 3' x 4' high cabinet with three 20 Meg 14" hard disc's spinning. I was outside the window with the computer guy when the pick up arm failed and the three discs exploded in a cloud of bytes. Scratch 60 Mb of data.

    I went with a friend to the Ont Ministry of Resources that had a $600,000 ink jet printer that was HUGE and spun a 3' x 2' piece of paper on a drum at 600 rpm while the jets slowly track that took an hour to do 72 dpi map.
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    A retired gentleman I met was telling me when computer first started to come into offices a techy told one of the guys that the computer needed re-booting. The guy kicked the tower and knocked it over.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

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    ^^ I'm guessing that old ICL was a 2903 or a 2904. I used to work for ICL typesetting the manuals for those models on a Linotype 505. We also used Datek keyboards producing punched tape. Fixing typos on those tapes was a joy (mild sarcasm) .

    Just to add: A lot of manuals were also typeset on old IBM 'golfball' typewriters on china clay coated papers where typos were fixed by scraping off the china clay coating with a scalpel blade, repositioning the carriage and typing the correction. Diagrams were hand-drawn with Rotring technical drawing pens on the same paper.

    I don't think the term 'geek' or 'nerd' had been invented at that time, c.1974, but the secret room upstairs had a sign on the door proclaiming Muppet Labs.
    Last edited by howie; 11-03-2014 at 11:47 PM. Reason: Additional hot info.
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    Speaking of disk drives, the first computer that I worked in the early 80s had a removable disk platter, the disks themselves were the size of large dinner plates. The disk "drive" was the size of a washing machine with a transparent door on the top through which you could access the platter. You would take a transparent cover that resembled a cake dish cover and align a key onto the top of the disk platter spindle and unscrew the whole platter to remove it from the disk drive. in effect removable storage. I remember once not screwing the platter on properly and having the whole thing slightly off kilter making it difficult to remove, I almost freaked out when that happened.

    Thinking back, it boggles my mind that you would expose the surface of the disk media to open air but I guess the magnetic density being far less than what is today, a particle or two might not cause data errors. Of course today's hard drives are totally sealed and wouldn't tolerate any foreign matter contamination.

    At a subsequent job, I was given a tour of the computer room and there was a separate room with double doors (obviously with a controlled environment) that had row upon row of IBM disk drives humming away like a sea of washing machines. A far cry from the thin disk arrays that one sees in a typical server rack today.
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    I didn't have much first-hand experience with a computer until windows 95 came out when I was in high school. But I remember my Dad working at one of the province's data centres in the Neil Crawford building in the early 90s. A huge cooled room with row after row of server racks. It was one of largest government data centres at the time (around 400gb) and cost a couple million to build. I wondered if they even imaged that 25 years later you'd be able to put the whole thing on a $50 portable usb drive that fits in your hand.

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    My old boss put the power cables in the old City Hall for the first voting computer. He always said that the xxxxing cables were huge.
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    While not really that old compared to some stuff, one of our guys at work found a computer running Windows NT 4 the other day. It was still being used as a regular workstation, and did not have a specific purpose, was just never replaced.

    The other thing that stands out was our first CD-Rom drive. I think it ran off the soundcard, as it all came in a bundle. But the thing I remember the most, was the size of the box it came in. The box was about 3 feet long, 2 feet tall, and about a foot deep. The box was mostly foam for packing. Was just massive. Now IF you buy an optical drive, you're lucky if you get a box.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lobbdogg View Post
    While not really that old compared to some stuff, one of our guys at work found a computer running Windows NT 4 the other day. It was still being used as a regular workstation, and did not have a specific purpose, was just never replaced.

    The other thing that stands out was our first CD-Rom drive. I think it ran off the soundcard, as it all came in a bundle. But the thing I remember the most, was the size of the box it came in. The box was about 3 feet long, 2 feet tall, and about a foot deep. The box was mostly foam for packing. Was just massive. Now IF you buy an optical drive, you're lucky if you get a box.
    haha, yeah, I remember my parents had to upgrade our 386DX with a "multimedia pack" or whatever that had a soundcard and CD-ROM drive so I could play SimCity 2000 way back in the day. I don't remember exactly how much it cost, but it was probably close to or around a thousand bucks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
    ... He always said that the xxxxing cables were huge.
    For a minute I didn't realize you were self-censoring, I was thinking huge xxx cables yup people still need extra bandwidth to handle all the porn they were surfing.

    I was told "washing machine" hard drives typically left the bottom and top sides of the platters empty because they were most likely to be exposed to dust, only the middle sides of the platters were used.

    PS: IBM used to use "Arizona Road Dust" during their testing phases for earlier hard drives. And one company was sending back Memorex disk packs because they were dinged up, only to find out their employees were playing hockey with them as the pucks and brooms for sticks.

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    In my large edmonton high school I jumped ahead of my grade level to take computing 30. I think there were only eight students in the class! All Chess Club types.
    I still have a stack of punchcards laying around somewhere...


    Later we had one of these at home... Used CPM2.2 (it was an early 'mobile' computer.)





    Some years later I was able to use Javelin Plus software. Used Lotus 123 daily but Javelin for big jobs. Multi-dimension views of data, pivot table like views, etc. Too bad it failed, it crashed the hardware of the day. Lotus IMPROV was sort of a knockoff that appeared later. Quantrix is about the only thing like it available today. I still don't care much for Excel in comparison to the now long gone Javelin.

    Watch the 10 minute mark:
    https://archive.org/details/Business1985

    "Products/Demos: Wordstar 2000, WordPerfect 4.1, Lotus 123, Javelin, ParadoxPC File/R
    This movie is part of the collection: Computer Chronicles"

    On Javelin:
    "Then there was the year Microsoft's new Windows spreadsheet, Excel, was up against start-up Javelin Software's Javelin spreadsheet for InfoWorld Product of the Year. Although Excel was a beautiful extension of the existing spreadsheet concept, Javelin had imaginative features, says Michael McCarthy, InfoWorld reviews editor from 1984 to 1990 and current publisher of IDG's San Francisco-based Web Publishing Inc., producers of JavaWorld and SunWorld. "I persuaded InfoWorld to give Javelin Product of the Year," McCarthy says. "At the InfoWorld dinner at Comdex, when they gave out the award for Product of the Year and Excel came in second, Bill Gates got up and stomped out of the room in front of everybody in a spectacularly rude manner." "Backstage: InfoWorld's movers and shakers By Scott Mace http://archive.infoworld.com/pageone...ackstage.shtml

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Javelin_Software

    .
    Last edited by KC; 12-03-2014 at 11:42 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AShetsen View Post
    I learned programming around 1983 on the IBM or Amdahl mainframe at the U of A that ran something called the Michigan Terminal System.

    (The first shot is the terminals. The second shot is of hardware that I never got to see, but I do remember the set of operating manuals in each terminal room in the old General Services Building and Assiniboia Hall -- that's the volume above -- I think it may have been actually the thickest single book in the world.)


    http://terminals.classiccmp.org/wiki...n_AJ_510-1.jpg



    (http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/gallery/pic/ibm67d.jpg)
    We may have been in the same classes. Did you take FORTRAN 77 or APL? All I remember from my stint in the computing science program was walking to another building to pick up hard copies of my runs and then seeing yellow everything as I drove home at 2am.
    Last edited by KC; 12-03-2014 at 11:24 AM.

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by EveB View Post
    When I started my word processing service (after several years of using typewriters), I got me a Kaypro II which I used until it cratered. After that, to keep me working, the professors I was working for gave me their accounts so I could work in the computer rooms. I was doing math typesetting using LaTeX on terminals similar to the previous post and batching them into the processing room so that I could get dot matrix feeds in my box.

    Eve
    Eve, is any of what you posted in English?
    j/k
    He who posteth too much, should moveth out of his parents basement and get a life.

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by bpeters View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by EveB View Post
    When I started my word processing service (after several years of using typewriters), I got me a Kaypro II which I used until it cratered. After that, to keep me working, the professors I was working for gave me their accounts so I could work in the computer rooms. I was doing math typesetting using LaTeX on terminals similar to the previous post and batching them into the processing room so that I could get dot matrix feeds in my box.

    Eve
    Eve, is any of what you posted in English?
    j/k
    English is banned from this thread. Acronyms and tech speak only - batch style preferred.

  25. #25

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    01010101000101010101010100001001011011110
    00010111010100100110010011001010001010010
    01110111010101001010011001100101001100111
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    Shift right double logical
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    We may have been in the same classes. Did you take FORTRAN 77 or APL? All I remember from my stint in the computing science program was walking to another building to pick up hard copies of my runs and then seeing yellow everything as I drove home at 2am.
    Fortran.

    $run *watfiv scards=assig1.for sprint=*print*

    with the data in the same input file at the end, separated by some job-control gobbledegook (all I remember is the // at the start of the lines).

    Submitted every other Saturday at midnight online, then a walk through the snow past the old SUB in its unmodified international-style, with CJSR playing weird, weird music...
    Last edited by AShetsen; 12-03-2014 at 10:34 PM.

  28. #28

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    Almost forget. - Big honkin daisy wheel printers and 11" x 17 city bock long paper (I striated sheet per box). With tear off perf'd side strips.

    Then $7,000 apple laser printers for the home office...

    Then cheap but impossible to read dot matrix printers.

  29. #29

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    And Space Age Font

    See Pressure Differential. And Protein Store

    http://catacombs.space1999.net/main/cguide/umsign.html

  30. #30

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    And who could forget the "good old days" when passwords were - easy to remember...

    Launch code for US nuclear weapons was as easy as 00000000
    Excerpt:

    "For nearly 20 years, the secret code to authorize launching U.S. nuclear missiles, and starting World War III, was terrifyingly simple and even noted down on a checklist.

    From 1962, when John F Kennedy instituted PAL encoding on nuclear weapons, until 1977, the combination to fire the devastating missiles at the height of the Cold War was just 00000000.

    This was chosen by Strategic Air Command in an effort to make the weapons as quick and as easy to launch as possible,..."

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-00000000.html

  31. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Almost forget. - Big honkin daisy wheel printers and 11" x 17 city bock long paper (I striated sheet per box). With tear off perf'd side strips.

    Then $7,000 apple laser printers for the home office...

    Then cheap but impossible to read dot matrix printers.

    And computer room dot matrix printers that printed an entire line in one hit. Everywhere you saw them the staff built sound insulating cabinets to keep down the noise.
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  32. #32

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    Kenbak-1


    The man who made 'the world's first personal computer'

    By Bill Wilson, Business reporter, BBC News, 6 November 2015


    http://www.bbc.com/news/business-34639183

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
    The games were awesome too!



    And every time I hear Castle Wolfenstein I think this:



    Many, many,hours wasted!

    Who knew 8 bit noise could sound like KAPUT
    Onward and upward

  34. #34

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    ^ "Many, many,hours wasted!"

    I've only played a couple computer games in my life. PacMan in the bars and then played Wolfenstein one night at home and kept going for several hours into the morning.

    It was a similar experience to my reading novels years before: I don't put the book down until I'm done. On fiction, I guess I'm a binge reader, so I stopped reading fiction. Experienced the same thing with Wolfenstein that night so I never went back to any computer game.



    Anyone notice who's pictured in the Kaypro photo above?
    Last edited by KC; 08-11-2015 at 11:05 PM.

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    Yes. Arthur C Clarke. It was a very popular computer including among people like archaeologists because it was built like a tank.

    My first purchased computer was a Kaypro II. And I transported it between my home and the campus all the time. It was stolen in a home burglary and because I had many files which belonged to others (I prepared Masters and Doctoral theses many of which were in the final stages), and because file formats were so proprietary back then, I bought a used Kaypro IV to replace it. (I had to tell one woman who bought an Osborne for her son for $2500 that I wouldn't even take it for free.)

    I still have fond memories of it. The Kaypro IV was given to an English major who just loved the look of it.

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    A long time friend was one of those geeks in school who did the punch card thing. He wound up graduating from U of A with a Computer Engineering degree, when they still had that.

    Undoubtably a genius (and Asperger's, for sure), there was a time when he was recognized as one of a handful of experts worldwide (I think I remember him saying he wasn't supposed to go to Russia), doing lectures at MIT, and working in the early Silicon Valley before returning home to Edmonton.

    He formed a company with another genius friend at U of A (now a math professor, I believe).

    That was quite a few years ago. Now their software is in more than half of the refineries in the world, and many nuclear reactors as well. Something to do with valves, but don't ask me Never had an incident. It just works.

    A big success, and a huge Edmonton success story, but he'd rather people didn't know about it so I won't mention their names. Now he says there are probably 1000 people in Edmonton that can do what he does. I think he's being very modest.

    He's ready to retire, but they keep offering him more money.
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  37. #37

  38. #38

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    An old, old tech firm - started in 1959!



    Thu Apr 21, 2016 4:35pm EDT Related: REGULATORY NEWS, BREAKINGVIEWS
    Solar developer SunEdison in bankruptcy as aggressive growth plan unravels
    BY TOM HALS AND NICHOLA GROOM


    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-su...-idUSKCN0XI1TC




    Foundation

    The establishment of Monsanto Electronic Materials Company (MEMC), a silicon wafer–manufacturing division to serve the emerging electronics industry, was announced on August 6, 1959, as an arm of the U.S.-based multinational corporation Monsanto.[6] In February 1960 MEMC started production of 19mm silicon ingots at its location in St. Peters, Missouri, 30 miles west of Monsanto's headquarters in St. Louis.[7] As one of the first companies to produce semiconductor wafers, MEMC was a pioneer in the field, and some of its innovations became industry standards into the 21st century.[8] MEMC used the Czochralski process (CZ process) of silicon crystal production,[9] and developed the Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) process of wafer finishing.[8][10][11] In 1966 MEMC installed its first reactors for the production of epitaxial wafers,[12][13] and developed zero-dislocation crystal growing, which made large-diameter silicon crystals possible.[8][14]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SunEdison
    Last edited by KC; 21-04-2016 at 03:46 PM. Reason: add history from wikipedia

  39. #39

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    US nuclear force still uses floppy disks
    4 hours ago


    Excerpt:

    "The report said that the Department of Defence systems that co-ordinated intercontinental ballistic missiles, nuclear bombers and tanker support aircraft "runs on an IBM Series-1 Computer - a 1970s computing system - and uses eight-inch floppy disks".
    ...

    The floppy disk - what is it?
    ....

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-36385839

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    Skynet will have problems taking that over.

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

  41. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
    Skynet will have problems taking that over.
    And it would never have guessed the nuclear balistic missle launch codes were: 000000


    Sorry, correction. Make that eight zeros.


    FOR NEARLY TWO DECADES THE NUCLEAR LAUNCH CODE AT ALL MINUTEMAN SILOS IN THE UNITED STATES WAS 00000000

    Today I found out that during the height of the Cold War, the US military put such an emphasis on a rapid response to an attack on American soil, that to minimize any foreseeable delay in launching a nuclear missile, for nearly two decades they intentionally set the launch codes at every silo in the US to 8 zeroes.

    problem that many U.S. commanders had the ability to launch nukes under their control at any time. Just one commanding officer who wasn’t quite right in the head and World War III begins. As U.S. General Horace M. Wade stated about General Thomas Power:

    I used to worry about General Power. I used to worry that General Power was not stable. I used to worry about the fact that he had control over so many weapons and weapon systems and could, under certain conditions, launch the force. Back in the days before we had real positive control [i.e., PAL locks], SAC had the power to do a lot of things, and it was in his hands, and he knew it.

    I used to worry about General Power. I used to worry that General Power was not stable. I used to worry about the fact that he had control over so many weapons and weapon systems and could, under certain conditions, launch the force. Back in the days before we had real positive control [i.e., PAL locks], SAC had the power to do a lot of things, and it was in his hands, and he knew it.
    http://www.todayifoundout.com/index....ates-00000000/


    http://cdn.moviestillsdb.com/sm/53d8...trangelove.jpg
    Last edited by KC; 26-05-2016 at 09:08 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    skytrain still runs on floppy disks too

    http://www.vancouversun.com/Inside+S...529/story.html
    And our metroline?

    Very interesting business lesson here! (See below)

    Maybe the old Royal Alberta Museum building should be deducted to Edmonton's globally monopolizing all the other defunct technology sites and sales.


    Think the floppy disk is dead? Think again! Here’s why it still stands between us and a nuclear apocalypse
    By Brad Jones — September 26, 2015


    Thankfully, the prescient Mrs. Persky wrestled the phone from his hands and agreed to the deal. ...

    His customer base has actually grown as retailers have abandoned the format. Today, there’s a pleasing sense of nostalgia to the business model that mimics the product that the company sells — while half of orders come via the web store, the other half are typically completed over the phone.
    ...




    But floppy disks were not.
    Replacing the machines would seem the logical option, but many of them are too valuable to scrap, or can’t be easily replaced by a modern equivilent. Tom lists the aforementioned embroidery machines, as well as ATMs, and some aviation tech as prime examples of devices that still have a need for data introduced through a floppy drive.

    The reach of the floppy disk today goes further than you might expect. If the thought of vital flight equipment using a floppy for input seems far-fetched, then you may well be surprised to hear that the format is still in use..."



    http://www.digitaltrends.com/computi...dgqRUNOArPG7vA
    Last edited by KC; 26-05-2016 at 09:21 AM.

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    The problems with the Metro Line began with the decision to try and integrate it's modern switching with the old system on the existing LRT lines. I wouldn't be surprised if that system did still have floppies.

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

  45. #45

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    Star Trek, 2001 Soace Odyssey, Space 1999... Among the first futurizations of computer tech


    FUTURE, PAST
    SPACE: 1999
    SEPTEMBER 28, 2010


    "When I was a kid I loved watching the 1970’s tv show Space: 1999. For some reason it was only on around 11 or 12 at night, and so I had to stay up late, which gave watching it a kind of other-worldly experience. A few months ago Sean Adams did a great post on the show’s fashions and interiors — and I’ve been meaning, since then, to post something on the show’s computer interactions.

    Watching it now, it’s fascinating to see the way that they use “Computer” — the master system that ran all of aspects of the moonbase. Computer was everywhere, and much of show, especially the command center, has the feeling of being set inside a computer lab. Strongly influenced by computer hardware designs of the 70’s, the sets have walls covered by rack-mounted, bold and colorful, units.
    ..."

    http://www.inventinginteractive.com/...28/space-1999/
    Last edited by KC; 29-05-2016 at 12:00 AM.

  46. #46

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    ^When I was a kid I used to call that the 60s sci-fi script font.

    For some reason it also evokes memories of that early 70s Canadian sci-fi series "The StarLost".
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    Or Space 1999

    [img]http://catacombs.space1999.net/main/...spttoa2236.jpg[/img]


    http://catacombs.space1999.net/main/...spttoa2236.jpg

    Moonbase alpha futuristic set design etc:

    http://catacombs.space1999.net/main/cguide/um.html







    See 20 minute mark - beats the USB stick. "What is planet tearth?"

    3 million people on board. Canadians think big!
    STARLOST:
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HqA0S_-b_Rs



    And Genesis II or Brave New World had the spinning disk/cylinder containing all known information. Plus the hyper loop.


    ~
    Last edited by KC; 29-05-2016 at 06:59 AM.

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    I loved every episode of Space 1999.

    But one thing abouthat most sci-fi movies and TV shows was that all the facilities are so clean and tidy.

    I liked the 1979 movie Alien because the mining ship was so realisticly dirty.
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    ^while I enjoy the gritty look, don't they have cleaning robots in the future? I remember space 1999 as a child, I loved the way ships looked, very cool memory. Neat, it's on YouTube
    Last edited by moahunter; 29-05-2016 at 12:23 PM.

  51. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^while I enjoy the gritty look, don't they have cleaning robots in the future? I remember space 1999 as a child, I loved the way ships looked, very cool memory. Neat, it's on YouTube
    Or the ability to create white walls and improve lighting. Blade Runnner on, all appear to occur in the post LED era. They are all as dark as a restaurant bathroom cubical.



    http://65.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lkd7hzJr6Y1qi4nyc.jpg


    http://www.steinerag.com/flw/Book%20...eckardInt2.jpg


    Skylab - before the dstopian future's destruction of the universe's white pigmentation and light bulbs.


    http://www.nasa.gov/centers/johnson/...nter12_med.jpg
    Last edited by KC; 29-05-2016 at 09:14 PM.

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    Even the ISS looks dark at night:


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    I grew up watching Space 1999, just finished watching an old Gerry Anderson show UFO their idea of a computer wasn't much more than a bunch of buttons and reel to reel tape. Garry stated that people liked the moon episodes of UFO which lead him to eventually develop Space 1999. I had heard they actually reused some of the set pieces from UFO for Space 1999 well.

    As an FYI the opening scene of Star Wars where the Blockade Runner fleeing the Star Destroyer was essentially lifted from Space 1999. Some of the same special effects artists where used in Star Wars and Alien notably Brian Johnson
    http://catacombs.space1999.net/main/...e/vccx.html#SW

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    UFO was one of my favorite sci-fi programs from that era. It was stylish, rather foreboding with all kinds of neat model vehicles e.g. submarines, various aircraft & spacecraft, tracked vehicles etc.

    And of course another Gerry Anderson creation Captain Scarlet and the Mysterions. Loved the cool vehicles and aircraft on that show as well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by norwoodguy View Post
    UFO was one of my favorite sci-fi programs from that era. It was stylish, rather foreboding with all kinds of neat model vehicles e.g. submarines, various aircraft & spacecraft, tracked vehicles etc.

    And of course another Gerry Anderson creation Captain Scarlet and the Mysterions. Loved the cool vehicles and aircraft on that show as well.
    Never heard of them. Any good links?

    I imagine thus stuff inspired a lot of computer people to come.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post

    Never heard of them. Any good links?

    I imagine thus stuff inspired a lot of computer people to come.
    UFO
    Looks like there are a number of full episodes on YouTube. The intro to each episode has a good number of model vehicle and special effects shots that will give you a taste of what it's like. Here's a couple of episodes

    Episode 17 (1970) - Sub Smash
    Episdoe 1 (1970) - Identified

    UFO Series Site

    A small bit of interesting trivia, Benedict Cumberbatch's mother Wanda Ventham was an actress on UFO and she was a rather attractive lady in her day.



    http://www.handjiveuk.com/index.php?...roduct_id=1014
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    Captain Scarlet and the Mysterions

    Episode 2 - Winged Assassin

    Episdoe 28 - Inferno

    The miniature model work is just great. No doubt Gerry Anderson influenced a lot of budding special effects people.

    BBC Captain Scarlet page
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    Interesting. It's always fascinating to go back and look at old portrayals of the future.


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    I never knew she was Cumberbatch's mom ... cool.

    The ironic part about Space 1999 is that they underestimated the computer technology, some of this was because of budget, some was this was what they guessed technology might be. Your car has more buttons and screens then the Eagles. The vast majority of monitors are black and white. While the clocks are analog, I prefer a simple analog clock over a digital clock.

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    Amazing that many of the Captains were Shakespearian actors.
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