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Thread: Will CBC kill the 6 o’clock news?

  1. #1
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    Default Will CBC kill the 6 o’clock news?

    Will CBC kill the 6 o’clock news?

    As it struggles with budget cuts and a changing media landscape, the public broadcaster considers overhauling its local TV news in cities like Edmonton, where costs are high, ratings are low and private broadcasters dominate.


    More:
    http://www.thestar.com/entertainment...lock_news.html
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  2. #2

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    A news service for barely 10,000 viewers doesn't make much sense. They should just have a national feed with some local reports.

    To be honest I never watch 6 pm news now, with smartphones it seems redundant. I like the national though mainly because it has some political commentary.

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    I think CBC Radio beats all the other radio stations by far, but I'm not sure if I'd even miss CBC TV at all beyond Marketplace and Fifth Estate and some documentary programming.

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    ^ Ditto. Maybe those shows could be moved to a CBC2. Then all the crap like Doyle, Heartland, Arctic Air, and that goofy-looking Newfie comedian, etc. could be abandoned on CBC and left to die a natural death.
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    ^^Agreed.
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  6. #6

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    But not CBC radio! Ever hear a private radio station interview the widows of fallen Canadian soldiers or anything really important in life?

    Private radio stations only seem superior in their ability to provide good music selection and mindless, meaningless banter but not much else. Though I do enjoy the 'spirited' programming like Roy Green, Charles Adler, etc. ...and I can't wait for my rare coloured diamonds to arrive and make me rich.

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    Quote Originally Posted by howie View Post
    ^ Ditto. Maybe those shows could be moved to a CBC2. Then all the crap like Doyle, Heartland, Arctic Air, and that goofy-looking Newfie comedian, etc. could be abandoned on CBC and left to die a natural death.
    They could do like Eddie Lampert is doing with Sears Holdings. Strip mining the company for its value like Craftsman, DieHard, home services, credit cards, etc. and licensing or selling them of and then putting the rest into "runoff" to free up its real estate, etc.

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    I never watch CBC TV news. Along with CKUA, I'm a fan of CBC radio though. Their music hosts are second to none, and their interview and commentary programs are terrific. Carol Off on As It Happens is one of the best interviewers I've ever heard.
    Fly Edmonton first. Support EIA

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    I was watching CBC News a few years ago until the tall foreheads decided to switch from a one-hour newscast to 3 half-hour segments between 5 PM and 6:30 PM. Now I might catch the occasional 5 PM or 5:30 PM show. The province-wide newscast will kill them.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by 24karat View Post
    I never watch CBC TV news. Along with CKUA, I'm a fan of CBC radio though. Their music hosts are second to none, and their interview and commentary programs are terrific. Carol Off on As It Happens is one of the best interviewers I've ever heard.
    Getting off topic but to me, CBC is to most private broadcasters, as the Edmonton Journal is to the Edmonton Sun.
    Private radio is amazingly generic in so many ways and generally horrible beyond music. (And I had an uncle that managed a few private radio stations and worked for Alberta's first radio station - CJCA - which apparently was originally owned by the Edmonton Journal. Maybe the change in focus of the private broadcasters has something to do with that loss of connection to the print world.)

    http://www.infoese.ca/CJCA%20History%201934.jpg

    http://www.infoese.ca/skutle.html

  11. #11

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    CBC should just stick to a single 24 hour news channel, plus local radio stations. Budget problems solved. Mandate maintained.

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    I would not really miss the local CBC TV news or the TV channel in general. I think the 30 minute forecast and the lack of resources or local content cut it back too far already, so I just don't bother. I flip between Global and CTV.

    Radio though is another story, at home I only listen to CBC radio1 and radio2 or CKUA, in the car I might bounce around a bit more, but the mainstream FM radio in Edmonton is just 'noise' and not my thing.

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    I swear by CBC Radio, it is amazing and has a formula that works and hardly changes.

    CBC TV however, you could make it all CBC News Network for all I'm concerned and get better programming.

    As for the local news casts, I remember in Newfoundland the local CBC supper hour news cast was more watched than the local NTV News. The local supper hour news cast will be market driven.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/...ticle18842102/


    Remembering Knowlton Nash is remembering a CBC that's long gone

    John Doyle - Television Critic

    The Globe and Mail

    Published Monday, May. 26 2014, 12:08 AM EDT

    The passing of Knowlton Nash on the weekend brought forth an outpouring of affection and admiration, from the public and from inside the Canadian news media.

    Deservedly so. Nash was a nice man, as gracious with pesky students as he was with CBC colleagues and powerful politicians. Years ago, when I was at university and involved in campus media, I directed a young woman, a first year student, to interview Nash about his book, History on the Run. He was still the anchor of The National at that point.
    More Related to this Story

    She returned from the assignment gushing about how charming, friendly and down-to-earth he was. He’d asked her many questions about her goals, her interest in news. “I can’t believe I was just chatting away with Knowlton Nash,” she said. I can still see her eyes glowing with excitement. She also liked the book, his ability to tell a story with clarity and precision.

    When Nash was anchor of The National and before that, for a decade, a CBC TV executive running the news and current affairs division, there was exceptional clarity and even precision to CBC TV’s role in Canada. It had a mandate, it had the resources and it forged ahead, telling stories, reporting on scandals and personalities. People paid close attention. The PMO paid attention. It mattered. Sure, I once heard Knowlton Nash joke that the firm line-up for The National was decided when the bulldog edition of the Globe and Mail appeared – the initial print edition that was sold on the street in Toronto in the early evening – and confirmed to CBC News the hierarchy of news stories. But CBC TV news started and controlled the national conversation to a forceful degree.

    Nash’s days at CBC, National anchor from 1978 to 1988, and just after, were extraordinary times. In Canada, the end of the Trudeau era and arrival of the Mulroney government. Abroad, the emphatic Reagan-era, the rise of neo-conservatism and the end of the Cold War. On CBC, The National was followed by The Journal and Barbara Frum, like Nash, directed a national conversation. Glory days.

    Nobody knew it then, but at the time of Nash’s departure, the dog days had just begun.

    It a short period, CBC TV news lost its leading role. It was partly self-inflicted diminishment and partly technology, along with a changing world. There was no persecution and no perfidious plot to undermine the CBC.

    There were bizarre decisions after Nash retired and his passing is an occasion to remember where a great deal went wrong at the CBC. The extraordinary decision to end The Journal following the death of Barbara Frum in 1992, was seismic, self-inflicted and suicidal. Next came the bizarre, utterly demented decision to replace The National with Prime Time News, a 9 p.m. program with Peter Mansbridge and Pamela Wallin as co-hosts of a news package which relied less on news stories for priority coverage than on trends and eccentricity. The timeslot was, like a lot of CBC decision at that time, lethal. Most people were watching hot U.S. network shows at that hour in prime-time.

    Then technology allowed cable and digital channels to flourish, the Internet to arrive and social media to influence everything about how we communicate. Knowlton Nash didn’t see it coming. Nobody did. In one of his books about the news business, Trivia Pursuit: How Showbiz Values Are Corrupting The News, published in 1998, Nash wrote, "A public that indulges primarily in tragedy, calamity, oddity, conflict, and sex is a public unprepared for intelligent discourse on major issues and knowledgeable decision-making." That’s a formidably prescient statement, given what has unfolded since then.

    And, as for the CBC News tradition that Nash so ably represented, that too has declined horribly. In fact it is lamentable to note that CBC TV’s own coverage of Nash’s death on Saturday was shabby, shoddy and so poorly done. On The National, anchor Kim Brunhuber struggled to suggest a narrative to Nash’s career as a repetitive series of footage of Nash, on The National, reporting from Vietnam Washington and Cuba, repeated endlessly and all the whole Peter Mansbridge nattered away, affectionately, but mindlessly, on the phone.

    Perhaps CBC TV News can do better in the coming days. Nash certainly deserves better. He epitomized the best of it, a national institution he helped shape as reporter, anchor and executive.

    His passing is an occasion to honour him as the affable, hardworking, respected news person he was. Shrewd, concise and clever. It’s also an occasion to realize that when we laud him, we laud a CBC that is long gone, and much missed.

    Follow John Doyle on Twitter: @MisterJohnDoyle


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    from the article:
    Michael Fulmes, the news director at Global, shrugs off the suggestion that the private broadcaster is beholden to the bottom line.

    “We wouldn’t be in the news business if we were there to make money, because there’s very few stations in this country that make money off of news,” says Fulmes, who has spent 37 years in the industry.

    Fulmes is sitting in his office, where a wall of TVs is tuned to his competitors’ stations — CTV, CBC News Network, and NBC for good measure.

    He says Global’s success is hard won with a focus on local stories that people talk about.

    “We’re very focused on our news agenda in terms of what we think our viewers want to see. We’re very focused on the community,” Fulmes said. “It’s relating to the folks and what resonates with them.”

    He says CBC has the luxury of being able to devote resources to investigative stories that don’t always connect with viewers.

    “I would do those stories, too, if the majority of my revenue came from taxpayers’ back pocket,” he says.
    Say hello to Mr. Smug..aka Michael Fulmes. His idea of "focus on local stories that people talk about", is the Global helicopter chasing the ambulance and firetrucks. Or piggybacking on the legwork of an Edmonton Journal reporter.

    Don't lie, you are in the news business to make money. Just air 9 hours a day of newscasts by repeating and beating the same news stories to fulfill the Canadian content regulations. It's cheap when Granny Gaga footage is replayed 5 times a day.

    The other major private broadcaster, CTV Edmonton, is way ahead of Global when it comes to local investigative reporting.

    There is an irony too. Over the years a lot of Global's on-air talent got their start by working at CBC. The government funded CBC trains them, so Global can snatch them. Nice luxury.

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