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Thread: Minneapolis-St. Paul: second light rail line opens

  1. #1

    Default Minneapolis-St. Paul: second light rail line opens

    http://urbanplacesandspaces.blogspot...ight-rail.html

    Minneapolis-St. Paul: second light rail line opens



    The new Green Line runs in within the street right of way but on dedicated lanes unlike the Blue Line which is mostly on dedicated right of way outside of street right of way.

    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

  2. #2
    highlander
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    Thanks, it looks like a decent project.

    A few notes:

    -There are only 3 blocks at the university that look like that picture, with the fancy median, and one of those is the station. This is a good thing, if the whole line were like that the train would be infernally slow.

    -On the main stretch down University ave there's a station about every 800m, or 4 200m blocks. half the cross streets are closed to vehicle traffic, but have a crosswalk, The crosswalks are done quite well, with 2 lanes of traffic, then a refuge, then the tracks, then a refuge, then the opposing traffic. Crosswalks at major street are more like our south line, with no refuge between the tracks and the street, at least on one side.

    -There's a freeway just 400m or so south of the line, so low ridership can be excused to some degree.

    -There's a station at Hamline next to what has to be the biggest decent TOD opportunity that I've seen. It's like Oliver square but with big square blocks instead of long skinny ones, and with many of the old commercial main street buildings still in place across the street, and with what looks like a solid neighbourhood behind.

    -There seems to be a whole lot of concrete around the tracks, for medians, etc. It'll look better than the gravel around SLRT, but it's not much better.

    -They seem to have placed the stations regularly with little regard for what's right there. The industrial surrounding station at Cleveland/Transfer makes Wagner look like thriving urbanity. They must be hoping for redevelopment

    - The stations are almost all located right at the more major cross streets, and very few others cross the interstate to the south (4 blocks) or the rail line 10 or so blocks north, so the stations are very well placed to intercept and connect with bus routes without requiring long transfers or inefficient detours.

  3. #3

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    45,000 ridership in the USA isn't low as an FYI

    The Minneapolis system is one of the most successful in the USA.

    I think the blue line is about 35,000 a year... I see if I can pull some stats.

    addition

    if the line achieves 45,000 rides a day it would make it the 11/10 most used LRT line compared to the entire systems in other cities. the apx 80,000 uses a day using both lines put the use of this system will sit around 7/8 most used LRT system in the USA up from it's current 17th place.

    but really to be fair you need to look at riders per km I feel.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...s_by_ridership
    Last edited by edmonton daily photo; 19-06-2014 at 01:12 PM.
    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

  4. #4
    highlander
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    45,000 is the estimate for 2030, and I wouldn't be too surprised to see it surpass that.

    But that's not all that impressive for an LRT line that serves 2 downtowns and a major university campus in a metro of about 3M people.

    But then, as I said, it's not the route's design at fault, it's the parallel interstates, and the sprawly urban design that's worse there than it is here.

  5. #5

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    ^ I find that they tend to underestimate the ridership on these systems only to have them over perform the estimates.

    you are right this goes through some pretty suburban low density areas....

    Look at SLT and their LRT with 44 KM of track and ridershilp of... 65,000.. If only we had 44 km of lrt here.

    Minneapolis system has spurred some pretty nice development in a hard hit area of the USA. Like the prior line this route did make choices that allowed for further development.

    HUD also helps a lot and is part of the reason you are seeing so many Streetcar systems being created in the USA.... When I say streetcar I mean mixed traffic.

    http://www.hud.gov/
    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander View Post
    - The stations are almost all located right at the more major cross streets, and very few others cross the interstate to the south (4 blocks) or the rail line 10 or so blocks north, so the stations are very well placed to intercept and connect with bus routes without requiring long transfers or inefficient detours.
    They are probably also doing this for signal priority timing (just guessing). You know, train only leaves station, once its green.

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