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Thread: Bicycle Signal lights etc.

  1. #1

    Default Bicycle Signal lights etc.

    Been looking around for a light kit for my bicycle. im normally a automobile driver and i know how the vast majority of bikes are invisible. and as the nights are getting darker earlier now it would be nice to have signal lights

    Anyone have any ideas?

    i have only found some cheap signal lights on dealextream for 10$ but they only have rear signal lights and a very annoying horn. im looking for something with both front and rear indicators (hopefully a brake light not that concerned about it) and a headlight.

  2. #2
    highlander
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    Signal lights as in turn signals? I've never even heard of them for bikes.

    All you really need are basic front and real (white and red) lights, ideally with lenses that direct some light to the side so that you're more visible.

    Edit: I like the PLasma/Quattro Lights from Mec. Decently bright, USB Charged and a rubbery impact and weather resistant exterior.

    Wearing a jersey/jacket/windbreaker with reflective stripes make your hand signals visible to any driver with working headlights, and use the simple "point right" signal for turning right, not the official "Point up with left hand". No one understands that one, it's less intuitive.
    Last edited by highlander; 15-08-2014 at 02:22 PM.

  3. #3
    I'd rather C2E than work!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Himser View Post
    Been looking around for a light kit for my bicycle. im normally a automobile driver and i know how the vast majority of bikes are invisible. and as the nights are getting darker earlier now it would be nice to have signal lights

    Anyone have any ideas?

    i have only found some cheap signal lights on dealextream for 10$ but they only have rear signal lights and a very annoying horn. im looking for something with both front and rear indicators (hopefully a brake light not that concerned about it) and a headlight.
    MEC have a good selection of lights, as do most bike stores.

    There are signal light kits available for bicycles, but they are quite new, and I haven't seen any or heard of anyone using them. I use reflective bands on my arms to help drivers and others see when I'm signalling.

    There are two reasons for lights - so you can see, and so others can see you. What I do is I have one bright light on the front of my bike aimed not too far in front of my bike, and a single red light at the back of my bike under the seat. (never put a white light on the back or a red light on the front, of course).

    It's the lights I have on my person that make a big difference. They are higher up, and easier to see. I put two clip on red lights on my backpack (I set them to blink), and sometimes have one on the back of my helmet.

    I have another "headlight" on my helmet. It's great because it focusses on wherever I'm looking, unlike the one on my bike.

    I don't know if the helmet light counts, but I've been told you cannot have more than two lights on the front of your bike, for some reason.

    Some of the lights available aren't very bright, but new technology has brought about some very bright lights - sometimes too bright. I keep the light on my bike aimed downward in front of me, so it can be full brightness, but I keep the one on my helmet no higher than medium, because it can be blinding, and it's harder to adjust mid ride.

    I switch between blinking and steady on with the light on my bike. Often if I'm stopped at a light or waiting to cross, I switch it to blink, because I think it's more noticeable.

    Besides lights, reflective clothing, straps, and tape applied to your bike can really help, especially from the side. There are reflector packs at MEC that are great for commuter bikes.
    aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

  4. #4

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    I use these for trail rides in the dark... needed for the upcoming fall/winter riding season. Probably a little much for the road, but I see they make commuter versions as well.
    http://www.niterider.com/

    anywhere from 300 to 3600 lumens.

  5. #5

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    Yea the cheap ones from china for some reason have a red light on the front too. I was thinking of just buying 2 of them duct tapering the red light on one disabling the red light on the controller and mounting them for about 20bucks.. but that's a lot of work I would rather a proper system. I'll recently check out med on my way home from downtown today.

  6. #6

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    If you're looking for cheap LED lights to experiment, Dollarama has a surprisingly good selection of LED bike lamps. Remember to bring cash or debit, as they don't accept credit cards.

  7. #7
    I'd rather C2E than work!
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    I use lights from Light & Motion. Their batteries last a long time.

    I find anything over 400 lumens is too bright for most commuter riding, unless it's pointed directly downward. There are extremely bright lights that are fine for night racing or trails, *** as long as everyone is going the same direction***, but they are bad for most riding because it's blinding to anyone approaching, and really inconsiderate.

    I found 200 is good for just about anything, including trails. This is on the lower end of lights these days, but I think the high lumens lights are to regular lights what an air horn is to a bell.

    Having the extra bright settings available to you can be useful. Just remember to switch down when a approaching a person, bike, or vehicle head on.

    I keep a few of those cheap frog lights in my backpack in case my batteries die or something happens to my light. They are ok, and will get you through. A couple bucks each when I bought them.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by Jimbo; 15-08-2014 at 06:08 PM.
    aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

  8. #8

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    Thanks

    haha so researching from the truck height thread. this is pretty much all it said about bicycles
    Bicycle equipment
    113(1) A person shall not ride a bicycle at nighttime unless the
    bicycle has the following:
    (a) at least one headlamp but not more than 2 headlamps;
    (b) at least one red tail lamp;
    (c) at least one red reflector mounted on the rear.
    (2) A person shall not ride a bicycle unless the bicycle has a brake.


    So far as ive been looking no one seems to know anything about signal lights.
    so i think i will build my own. (thanks Ustauk ill pick some up there) (following these standards haha (why not)

    Signal lamp standards
    23(1) This section applies to a vehicle, other than a towed
    implement of husbandry, manufactured on or after January 1, 1971.
    (2) One set of turn signal lamps on a vehicle that has turn signal
    lamps must comply with the following:
    (a) they must be located at or near the front of the vehicle;
    (b) they must be on the same level and as widely spaced
    laterally as practicable;
    (c) when lit, they must emit amber light that is plainly visible
    from at least 250 metres ahead.
    (3) One set of turn signal lamps on a vehicle that has turn signal
    lamps must comply with the following:
    (a) they must be located at or near the rear of the vehicle;
    (b) they must be on the same level and as widely spaced
    laterally as practicable;
    (c) when lit, they must emit red or amber light that is plainly
    visible from at least 250 metres to the rear.
    (4) The turn signal lamps or mechanical turn signal devices must
    be self-cancelling on a vehicle that is less than 2.05 metres wide,
    including its load.
    (5) A turn signal lamp or a mechanical turn signal device on a
    vehicle must be mounted on a rigid part of the vehicle that is not
    glazing.
    (6) A turn signal lamp on a vehicle must be mounted so that the
    centre of the lamp is not less than 380 millimetres or more than
    2.11 metres above ground level when the vehicle is not loaded.
    (7) A truck tractor with front turn signal lamps that are double
    faced and meet the visibility requirements in subsection (2) need
    not have a set of rear turn signal lamps.
    ( A vehicle or trailer must be equipped so that the driver is able
    to indicate the direction in which the driver intends to turn the
    vehicle or trailer
    (a) by turning on and flashing the front and rear turn signal
    lamps on the side of the vehicle towards which the turn is
    to be made, or
    (b) by using the mechanical turn signal device on the side of
    the vehicle towards which the turn is to be made.
    (9) A mechanical turn signal device must be self-illuminating if it
    is used at nighttime.
    (10) Subsection (2) does not apply to a trailer.
    (11) Subsection (4) does not apply to a motor cycle.

    and 200ln is good thats awesome ill pick one of these (thanks Jimbo) i think http://www.dx.com/p/singfire-sf-825-...6#.U-62_vnHgXM

  9. #9
    I'd rather C2E than work!
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    Good choice. You can always move up and buy a second one, and it's under $12.



    This is my main bike. If you look closely you can see some of the reflective tape I put on. It really stands out in the headlights.

    But then, I've been known to bedeck my entire bike with Christmas lights during the season. I'm not sure you want to be that guy

    PS: the rack on the front has a bottle opener, and fits a six pack.
    aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

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