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Thread: Edmonton's Energy Transition Strategy

  1. #1
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    Default Edmonton's Energy Transition Strategy

    Quote Originally Posted by Edmonton Journal

    January 27, 2015

    City hopes new energy plan will help environment while creating $2.5 billion in savings

    The city wants to reduce reliance on private vehicles as part of an energy saving plan.
    Photograph by: Bruce Edwards , Bruce Edwards

    A new Edmonton energy plan calls for big reductions in fossil fuel consumption that would fight climate change and save billions of dollars.

    By 2035, the proposed community energy transition strategy wants to cut local emissions of greenhouse gases linked to global warming by 35 per cent from 2005 levels.

    While the scheme requires the city to spend an initial $100 million over four years and possibly more later, this is a fraction of the expected benefits.

    After all costs are factored in, building, industry and vehicle owners are anticipated to save $2.5 billion over the next 20 years from lower energy bills.

    Those savings jump to $3.4 billion when the social costs of lower greenhouse gas emissions are considered.

    “In Edmonton, even if we didn’t reduce one molecule of CO2, the community would still see a $2.5-billion benefit,” Jim Andrais, environmental policy program manager, said Monday.

    “It’s valuable. We’re saying there is a strong business case in the numbers we have modelled.”

    Officials have been working on the energy blueprint since 2012, including receiving input from a 56-member citizen panel.

    (...)
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...790/story.html

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    Last edited by Admin; 28-01-2015 at 11:45 AM. Reason: removed full article. Full article is available on the Journal site.
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    "Reduce energy consumption by 25 per cent per person from 2009 levels by 2035"

    I wonder if this is net or gross energy consumption? For example, if you install solar PV on your roof, your net energy consumption will go down and you'll pull less from the grid, but unless you change the appliances and lifestyle, your gross consumption isn't going to change.

    Do these goals assume the annexation of Sherwood Park in this time frame? All those plants and refineries use quite a bit of energy.

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    Also, the goals seem awfully lofty. How much of this does the City actually control, versus the province? Why is the city sepending money researching this stuff, to the tune of $100m over four years? That would almost pay for a recreation center or a new hockey rink somewhere, wouldn't that be a better investment rather than all this David Suzuki stuff? If you want that in your life, login to his website, no $100m over four years needed. I'm cool with city recycling plans, and Biowaste and stuff, and more infill, but the big picture / wish list here seems a bit extreme. Take for example this one:

    - Change behaviour by introducing financial incentives that will eventually be replaced by regulations or market forces. The incentives would push for such moves as better energy efficiency in homes and other buildings, increased use of renewable energy and increased purchases of electric vehicles;
    Seriously, the city is going to use rates they collect from people to subsidize / provide financial incentives to buy electric vehicles (which, in Central / Northern Alberta, are powered by mostly coal and some natural gas)?
    Last edited by moahunter; 27-01-2015 at 05:18 PM.

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    "Reduce energy consumption by 25 per cent per person from 2009 levels by 2035"
    How?
    This looks like a goal, not an action.

  5. #5

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    "The city missed its previous target of cutting emissions 20 per cent below 1990 levels by 2008, seeing them instead rise about 17 per cent."

    Population grew about 20-25% and emissions rose 17%. IMHO, most of the per capita savings of about 3-6% were probably a result from increased insulation in homes, more efficient furnaces and more efficient cars & trucks. Little. if any of the improvements were created by the COE initiatives other than newer fleet vehicles etc.

    They talk NOW about the fixing the fences and closing the gates a decade after the entire herd of horses have bolted. The unrestrained urban sprawl and slow growth of infill housing are the direct result of the COE not ensuring the past goals of reducing emissions. The AHD should have been the expansion limit of the city with a 2 or 3 kilometer wide greenbelt. More initiatives like the hugely successful Railtown tax subsidies that resulted in ~15,000 infill units spin-offs in downtown should have been offered years ago. Let's not even talk about the stupidity of destroying our 127km electric trolley network.
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    Edmonton's Energy Transition Strategy.

    http://edmonton.ca/city_government/e...ransition.aspx
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    Before the city gets ahead of itself, it's gotta get funding from the province (HA!), which isn't gonna happen & we'll need a huge shift in power generation in this province before ANYTHING is powered with "clean electricity".

    As of 2pm today, here's the current state of power generation in the province. Apologies for the width, resizing makes it too hard to read the tiny text. MC is Maximum Capacity, TNG is Total Net Generation and DCR is Dispatched Contingency Reserve.

    Last edited by noodle; 06-02-2015 at 02:09 PM.
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  8. #8

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    Edmonton's Energy Transition Strategy

    Initial outlay of $100 million over 4 years.
    Oh pleeeeeeeeeeeze, slap those councillors and mayor up the side of the head. Another hare brained scheme brought to you buy Edmonton City Admin. Leave this to the Feds, see how far they get with it. Leave it to car manufactures to come out with fuel efficient vehicles. It should not be a municipal initiative of that magnitude.
    Last edited by Gemini; 06-02-2015 at 02:37 PM.
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    City councillors want to make certain Edmonton’s energy plan isn’t full of hot air


    BY GORDON KENT, EDMONTON JOURNAL

    EDMONTON - City councillors insisted Wednesday a new plan to cut Edmonton greenhouse gas emissions and energy use must show exactly how much has been saved.

    “This is something that’s going to cost us a lot of money, so it better not be symbolic,” Coun. Michael Oshry said.

    “If we’re going to spend tens of millions of dollars on environmental issues, we better be able to show the citizens they’re getting value for their money.”

    By 2035, the community energy transition strategy aims to reduce Edmonton greenhouse gases 35 per cent and energy consumption per person 25 per cent, compared to 2005.

    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...693/story.html
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    So if we annex the airport do those emissions count?? I would hate to see the carbon footprint of 100+ commerical planes taking off.

    As Gemini said leave a program like this to the feds. You areo nly going to drive away more industry with tough 'policiies' like this.

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    Energy plan passed unanimously. Let the Co2 cuts begin - soon. #ejlive #yegcc #yeg
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    Quote Originally Posted by noodle View Post
    Before the city gets ahead of itself, it's gotta get funding from the province (HA!), which isn't gonna happen & we'll need a huge shift in power generation in this province before ANYTHING is powered with "clean electricity".

    As of 2pm today, here's the current state of power generation in the province. Apologies for the width, resizing makes it too hard to read the tiny text. MC is Maximum Capacity, TNG is Total Net Generation and DCR is Dispatched Contingency Reserve.


    Having worked in the Power Generation industry this IS a huge shift in Cleaner energy production, there was a day not very long ago that roughly 15 percent of the production was from Natural Gas, looking now its over 50%, still fossil fuel yes, but a way cleaner version. and don't even get started on wind power as you can see, it's very little of the generation and CAN NOT be relied on for the amount of energy this province requires on a regular basis, it's just not reliable enough, next up is Coal gasification to take all the readily available coal in Alberta and turn it into cleaner burning NG. we can't create energy from something we don't have and we HAVE coal and Natural Gas(some of it waste gas)
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    Seriously, one full time communication person in a department of four. Seems to be a little heavy reliance on that.
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    Unfortunately Alberta government is focusing in wrong direction regarding CO2 emissions and envirnonment.

    UN has released their report several years ago, claiming that cars, trucks, ships, airplanes, trains and everything that is powered by fossil fuels etc combined together do not produce more than 25% of world CO2 emissions.
    On the other side, animal agriculture is the main pollutant with producing more than 50% of CO2 emissions.

    Is this government supported by "environmental" companies who actually don't care about planet and its future, but rather money...or people in government are just dumb and they just follows what it says in the news I wouldn't know...

    But it's sad they are "focusing" to help reduce emission in wrong sector.

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    ^ Not really. The net CO2 emissions from agriculture are a result of fossil fuel combustion. For plants, this includes production and distribution of agrochemicals, planting and harvesting, and processing and transportation of crops. Processing and transportation inputs also apply to meat production, but the big problem with raising animals for food is that they need to be fed many times more calories than can be harvested as meat, so the primary inputs for growing their feed are multiplied. The cost penalty of a broadly based carbon tax will thus be multiplied as well, which should increase the cost of meat relative to plant-based foods and encourage consumers to adjust their diets accordingly.

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    Edmonton to become first Canadian city to lead 'big' energy program
    June 2, 2017
    Media are invited to join Councillor Scott McKeen, Percy Woods, CEO of BOMA Edmonton and Sidney Waskiewich, Senior Director at Qualico Commercial as they launch a new City program aimed at helping large buildings reduce their energy use.

    Date: Monday, June 5, 2017
    Time: 10 a.m.
    Location: EPCOR Tower, 10423 - 101 St, Edmonton (NE side of lobby)

    Councillor McKeen and other speakers will be available for interviews and questions.


    Media contact:
    Becky Machnee
    Communications Advisor
    City of Edmonton
    780-944-0420
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    The rebirth of District Energy?

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    It is coming... Enmax driven.
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    Edmonton becomes first city in Canada to lead big building energy program

    June 5, 2017
    The City is launching a voluntary Large Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure program (LBERD) aimed at transforming Edmonton’s large buildings. This is the first municipally-led program of its kind in Canada. It will provide building owners with valuable information about their building energy performance and help them take advantage of Energy Efficiency Alberta programs and incentives for upgrades to heating, cooling and lighting systems. Energy efficient buildings are critical to achieving Edmonton’s energy efficiency and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets.

    “People don’t realize that buildings contribute 39 per cent of Edmonton’s GHG emissions and 42 per cent of our energy consumption. A 10 per cent reduction in energy use of just one large building would be equivalent to taking 22 cars off the road for one year,” says Lisa Dockman, Senior Project Manager for the Energy Transition Strategy. “The Government of Canada’s Pan Canadian Framework for Clean Growth and Climate Change indicates that labelling of building energy use will be regulated nationwide as early as 2019. This program will help Edmonton’s building owners prepare for future regulation and take advantage of existing government incentives.”

    “High-performing green buildings and excellence in energy performance are top of mind for most building owners and operators,” says Percy Woods, CEO of BOMA Edmonton. “Many large building owners and managers already engage in building energy reporting and benchmarking as part of their BOMA BEST certification. Our programs together will help the City reach more buildings and its environmental targets.”

    As part of its own leadership in GHG reductions, the City is committing to have 20 City-owned buildings, including City Hall, participate in the program in the first year. Large building owners and property managers can learn more and sign up for LBERD by visiting edmonton.ca/energybenchmarking. The Large Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure program is one of the many actions that the City is taking to implement the Energy Transition Strategy which moves Edmonton towards the goal of being an energy sustainable city.


    For more information:

    edmonton.ca/energybenchmarking

    Media contact:

    Becky Machnee
    Communications Advisor
    City of Edmonton
    780-944-0420
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    while i wish them luck, as with many things the devil will be in the details and the execution...

    it needs to be much more in-depth than simply dollars and/or consumption per building or even per square foot per building if there is going to be value for the private sector that they can benchmark.

    if the numbers are going to have any relevance, you need to know how they are measured, i.e. you need to know:

    which boma standard is being used;
    whether total gross building areas are available;
    whether parkades are included or not;
    whether lobby areas are included or not;
    whether there are any after hours uses (i.e. retail or call centres);
    whether there are any high consumption uses occupying portions of the building (i.e. computer centres or data farms); etc.

    without knowing all of these things and others (such as occupancy levels in the building during the reporting period), then it will be a nice pr gesture but the data won't be transparent enough for the benchmarks to have any real world meaning or applicability. looking at the consumption numbers for century place vs chancery hall as an example would have little value without the details. and it's nice to know city hall will be included in the program but i'm not sure that city hall will ever be able to serve as comparable for many other buildings.
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