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Thread: '71 Progressive Conservative campaign quotes

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    Default '71 Progressive Conservative campaign quotes

    I flipped open an old magazine I have in the basement and found a very interesting old article in it. Here's just a few excerpts of what Peter Lougheed was saying at the time. Most interesting and meaningful of all were his "social balance sheet" comments regarding corporate responsibilities but I don't have time now to quote it here.

    These quotes however are more topical...


    "Complains Peter Lougheed: The current administration has concentrated too deeply on the large corporations. The smaller businessman and entrepreneur has been sadly neglected. I happen to believe…” - Peter Lougheed, pg 55


    I think that this province is ready for a much greater and varied degree of industrialization. The past government policies appear to have been aimed at giving massive assistance to purely big business, to the extent that the small businessman has been almost totally excluded. We want to continue to attract large corporations to Alberta but we should try to promote and help the small businessman whose biggest need is for expansion capital”. - Peter Lougheed, pg 55


    “I really think that there is a growing awareness outside the two metropolitan areas that the governing party has not been occupied with the smaller centres. They are beginning to realize that they have had less of a share, much less in many instances, of what has been going on in terms of industrial development than perhaps they should have been entitled to and have expected.” - Peter Lougheed, pg 55


    “We have had no policies from the Social Credit that have helped the smaller centres. All the emphasis has been on the two great metropolitan cities. These two cities have experienced tremendous growth in the last few years. Perhaps there has been too much growth too quickly. The result has been formidable problems. Problems such as very bad congestion.” - Peter Lougheed, pg 55


    “The rapid rate of change throughout the world means that governments must also change and have policies that anticipate situations and not merely react to them. In my own view, I believe that a fresh young team which has its attention on the future can do this better than a 36-year-old government that fixes its attention on the past.” - Peter Lougheed, page 63,


    Source: face-off! Harry Strom by Marnie Huckvale, Peter Lougheed by Paul Conrad Jackson, Pages 52 - 63 Alberta Business Journal, April 1971


    Last edited by KC; 09-04-2015 at 11:35 AM.

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    Good find KC.

    45 years of PC governing Alberta.

    And nothing's changed.

    They always did talk a good game.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    “We have had no policies from the Social Credit that have helped the smaller centres. All the emphasis has been on the two great metropolitan cities. These two cities have experienced tremendous growth in the last few years. Perhaps there has been too much growth too quickly. The result has been formidable problems. Problems such as very bad congestion.” - Peter Lougheed, pg 55
    Interesting, as it kind of contradicts the received history that Social Credit was indifferent to the interests of the major cities.

    The wiki article on that election shows that Social Credit actually did manage to hold onto four seats in Calgary, and both of the seats in Lethbridge(which I assume would qualify as a "smaller centre"). Nothing in Edmonton, Red Deer or Grande Prairie though.
    Last edited by overoceans; 09-04-2015 at 11:53 AM.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by overoceans View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    “We have had no policies from the Social Credit that have helped the smaller centres. All the emphasis has been on the two great metropolitan cities. These two cities have experienced tremendous growth in the last few years. Perhaps there has been too much growth too quickly. The result has been formidable problems. Problems such as very bad congestion.” - Peter Lougheed, pg 55
    Interesting, as it kind of contradicts the received history that Social Credit was indifferent to the interests of the major cities.

    The wiki article on that election shows that Social Credit actually did manage to hold onto four seats in Calgary, and both of the seats in Lethbridge(which I assume would qualify as a "smaller centre"). Nothing in Edmonton, Red Deer or Grande Prairie though.
    The article discusses Lougheed's views that Social Credit was essentially doing nothing to aid farmers during the "farming crisis" of the day and the Ag department was following the lead of the federal department - and a major shakeup was in order. I recall the Strom side of the article discussing a lowering of the voting age to get the younger voters for the Social Credit Party. Fascinating stuff.


    Of course you all will easily guess my favourite quote since is says "anticipate situations and not merely react to them":

    “The rapid rate of change throughout the world means that governments must also change and have policies that anticipate situations and not merely react to them. In my own view, I believe that a fresh young team which has its attention on the future can do this better than a 36-year-old government that fixes its attention on the past.” - Peter Lougheed, page 63, Alberta Business Journal, April 1971
    Last edited by KC; 09-04-2015 at 12:04 PM.

  5. #5

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    So the PC's started out from the outset realizing the key votes were rural ones / small towns, not the big bad cities. Nothing has changed, rural and bedroom communities will mostly decide the election.

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    Lougheed had big plans for one of the "Big, Bad Cities" anyway. Maybe some other magazine in Kc's basement might reveal those plans.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by SP59 View Post
    Lougheed had big plans for one of the "Big, Bad Cities" anyway. Maybe some other magazine in Kc's basement might reveal those plans.
    What was that? Off the top of my head I'd say that Lougheed was good to Edmonton on the government side anyway. (Remember that he lived and raised his kids here too.) I don't know if he had any direct influence to bias business choices to the benefit or not of cities.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SP59 View Post
    Lougheed had big plans for one of the "Big, Bad Cities" anyway. Maybe some other magazine in Kc's basement might reveal those plans.
    The Socred's power base was in Calgary. Remember, the Calgary Prophetic Bible Institute was in. . . well, Calgary.

    Calgary has long enjoyed the political power because it reflected A) where the American and Scottish money was and B) reflected the American settlers as opposed to the more foreign settlers in the Edmonton region. When the Liberals put the capital in Alberta, the American population eventually organised under the concept of WH Woods' brand of "Western Alienation." This would be central to Greenfield's and Brownlee's campaigns, especially with their deference to populism to get that message across. The Socreds and the Progressive Conservatives have never mucked with the iconoclast identity that Albertans took and as a result were able to enjoy dynastic terms in office. The only reason they fall is due to inability to deal with the changing times.
    Xelebes

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    “The rapid rate of change throughout the world means that governments must also change and have policies that anticipate situations and not merely react to them. In my own view, I believe that a fresh young team which has its attention on the future can do this better than a 36-year-old government that fixes its attention on the past.” - Peter Lougheed, page 63, Alberta Business Journal, April 1971
    2015 Campaign quotes...

    “Although Alberta has a very conservative voting record, the values, the belief systems and the aspirations of Albertans are increasingly progressive, forward looking, more diverse, driven by a younger population who don't feel they are really well represented by their provincial government" - Rachel Notley, Edmonton Woman Magazine Mar/Apr, 2025


    Remarkably, Rachel
    Smart, savvy and dedicated, Rachel Notley is determined to make a difference.
    Mar 05, 2015, By: Ellen Nielsen
    http://www.edmontonwoman.com/article...03059968/0/ewm

  11. #11

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    Some history...

    Interesting bias on the part of the author regarding 'calibre'

    Party of the People: Peter Lougheed and the Alberta PCs
    May 20, 2015

    "In 1965, no one knew that the lawyer Peter Lougheed would become one of the best Premiers in Canadian history. Then, he was a young lawyer and grandson of Albertan politician James Lougheed and faced with revitalizing a dead party. The Alberta PCs had never been in government, and their best showing had been in 1917 when they won 19 out of 58 seats. Since then they had languished and didn’t even have candidates in some ridings for the half-century until Lougheed became Party Leader. Lougheed immediately set out on the path to power. He established “guideposts” for the PCs, outlining exactly what policies and positions a PC government would take and distinguishing themselves (but not too much) from the ruling SoCreds. The Lougheed PCs were still conservative, he reminded Albertans, but they were also progressive. Change was not a bad thing. ..."

    "Lougheed had the advantage of rising oil prices, a relatively minor ideological shift from the conservative Social Credit Party to the Conservative Party, and also had years of building his party and preparing for government from the time he was elected leader in 1965. Notley only became leader of the NDP eight months ago in October 2014. While both had little experience in government, Lougheed’s Cabinet was generally filled with lawyers, doctors and businessmen. Notley does not have the same calibre on which to draw. ..."

    http://clioscurrent.com/blog/2015/5/...he-alberta-pcs
    Last edited by KC; 11-11-2015 at 10:00 PM.

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    Peter Lougheed was held in such high regard that I believe that 'his' PC party endured so long in Alberta because of him even though he had not been the leader for decades.

  13. #13

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    How Two Very Different Alberta Premiers Shaped the Oil Sands | The Tyee
    And how their legacies affect Rachel Notley’s government today. A Q&A.
    By James Wilt
    Today | Desmog Canada

    Excerpt:

    "What compelled you to write this report?

    I think there’s a lot out there about the current situation regarding energy policy, the NDP government, what they have to do or what they shouldn’t do. But I think people, in many ways, have lost track of how we got where we are. It’s kind of a long and windy road, but it’s really interesting and I just think it’s part of the history and it puts into context what’s happening now.

    A key part of the report concerns Peter Lougheed’s legacy, something which many Albertan politicians will harken back to. Do you sense that politicians who talk about Lougheed necessarily recognize the true legacy of Lougheed?

    I don’t think people recognize how much government intervention there was in terms of really kickstarting the development of the oilsands. The government put in a lot of public money, a lot of organization, and not just a one-shot deal: it went on for a long time. I think the fact the oilsands then became so valuable and so much of the technology became so important, particularly the in situ, is really because of all the public money that was spent during the Lougheed era. That was basically all money that the corporate sector didn’t have to pay. Not that they didn’t pay anything, but they were in many ways subsidized by the government of the time.

    ..."

    "I think there’s a couple of things there. One is I think he was actually quite visionary. I think he thought in terms of the big picture, as well as being someone who was pragmatic enough to know how to get to the big picture. Also, it was a different time in the sense where government intervention in various programs was more accepted than it is now: that really fell off in the ’80s. It was a more accepted economic or public policy practice then than it is now.

    One of Ralph Klein’s first moves was to sell off the Alberta Energy Company, which was a big part of Lougheed’s legacy. What motivated that decision?
    ..."


    https://thetyee.ca/News/2017/06/15/H...pes-Oil-Sands/


    Betting on Bitumen
    Alberta's Energy Policies from Lougheed to Klein


    JUN 07, 2017
    DOWNLOAD THE FULL REPORT

    Excerpt:

    "Klein believed that freeing up the industry would increase private investment in the oil sands and generate well-paying work for Albertans. The policies adopted by Klein and his cabinet were a bold departure from the way Lougheed had envisioned oil sands development. They were both PC premiers, but their ideas of how the oil sands should be developed and who should have the upper hand were completely different. ..."


    "Klein’s strategy was developed almost entirely under the aegis of the Alberta Chamber of Resources (ACR), an industry association ...

    "The final report of the National Task Force on Oil Sands Strategies—which was brought to fruition without public hearings or written submissions from individual Albertans and other stakeholders—contained several recommendations that were quickly adopted ...

    "The oil sands industry paid for almost all the publicity and lobbying following the release of the task force report. Most news coverage of the report neglected..."



    http://www.parklandinstitute.ca/betting_on_bitumen


    Betting on Bitumen
    Alberta's Energy Policies from Lougheed to Klein


    JUN 07, 2017

    Excerpt:
    “Alberta owns the supply (one third of the world’s known reserve) and the greatest demand emanates from markets external to Canada. With time Alberta should be able to utilize the tar sands as a lever in the socio-economic development of the province” (Conservation and Utilization Committee, 1972, p. 46).
    A 1972 document produced for the government of Alberta and dealing with foreign ownership presents the oil sands as a unique resource capable of shifting existing trade power dynamics. It notes:

    The tar sands offer a unique opportunity to change the historical trend of ever increasing foreign control of non-renewable resource development in Canada. Here is a reserve of the greatest magnitude which does not require highly speculative investment to find and prove. The world-wide demand for petroleum will be so compelling within the near future that it should be Alberta’s objective to increase Canadian equity participation in the resource developments. Huge amounts of capital will be required for further development of technology and the purchase of plants and equipment. However, to the maximum extent equity capital should be raised in Alberta and Canada recognizing that the usual past constraints of unproven reserves and uncertain markets. (Conservation and Utilization Committee, 1972, p. 16)
    In a speech to Calgary’s business community in 1974, Lougheed warned his audience that the province had only a decade to diversify its economy, and the first objective must be “to strengthen the control by Albertans over our future and to reduce the dependency for our continued quality of life on governments, institutions or corporations directed from outside the province” (Richards and Pratt, 1979, p. 233).

    ...
    "

    https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.ne...pdf?1496686713
    Bolding in quotation above was mine
    .
    Last edited by KC; 15-06-2017 at 07:41 AM.

  14. #14

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    ... the entire article is a great read.

    I highly recommend it!!!



    Alberta’s Quiet Revolution: The Early Lougheed Years « James H Marsh

    “...Of the fight with Ontario then Energy Minister Don Getty recalled that “we interfered, but the interference was needed.” Petrochemicals were flowing out of the province to stock giant refineries in Ontario and that had to stop. When he became energy minister, Getty had discovered that one of his jobs was to sign Natural Gas Removal Permits, allowing oil and gas to leave the province. After telling Lougheed of this, the premier told him never to sign another. As Getty noted, without such measures “you would never have built the kind of province that Alberta is now.”[51]

    For Lougheed, the financial boon was not just about “fair value” to the owners of the resource, the people of Alberta, but was necessary to pay for his activist agenda. On the first day of his regime plans for three new wilderness areas, subsidies for seniors and homes for disabled children were announced. Further plans were outlined before the end of 1972, with the government proposing building a network of rural airports and offering millions of dollars in grants to homeowners. Then, after 1974, there was aid for mass transit and $100 million for oil sands development, rural electrification, cities, schools, the disabled and seniors. The government also launched the Agricultural Development Corporation, the Alberta Opportunity Company and the Alberta Development Corporation. Government spending soared from $929 million (from revenues of $958 million) in 1971 to $6.6 billion (from $9.4 billion in revenues) in 1980,[52]and the number of civil servants increased from 18,495 to 33,607.[53] Lougheed later admitted that he may have overdone the new spending but he argued that the Socreds had allowed the provincial infrastructure to deteriorate badly.[54]

    Such unabashed government action rankled right-wing conservatives. For many, all that separated Lougheed from the hated socialists was his failure to nationalize the oil patch and his reluctance to institute a wholesale redistribution of wealth. Conservative critics exploded when in the summer of 1974 the province acquired a controlling interest in...”


    http://www.jameshmarsh.com/2011/11/a...ougheed-years/


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