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Thread: City moves to save Edmonton's historic Iron Works, expropriate scrap yard

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    Default City moves to save Edmonton's historic Iron Works, expropriate scrap yard

    City moves to save Edmonton's historic Iron Works, expropriate scrap yard
    http://edmontonjournal.com/news/loca...ate-scrap-yard

    City council will be asked to approve a plan to expropriate a former scrapyard and other lands in Boyle Street to make a new park and protect a historic industrial site Friday.
    Administration brought the last minute move to committee Thursday after the court receiver holding the lands applied for a demolition permit for the Iron Works.
    Expropriation will save the building and push the city’s major redevelopment plans forward, said Coun. Scott McKeen. “The people living there complain about the scrap yard. It looks derelict. It’s quintessential urban decay.”
    The 20 parcels of land between 105th and 104th avenues and 95th and 96th streets are owned by Canadian Consolidated Salvage and a numbered company. Most of it has been used as a scrap yard for years. The city wants to use it for a park space that winds between future residential properties and a community garden. It borders the new Boyle Renaissance residential tower, the Boyle Street community hall and Urban Manor, a home where men previously living on the street are still allowed to drink a controlled amount of alcohol.

    The city is moving to expropriate an old scrap yard and the historic Iron Works building in Boyle Street. November 26, 2015. Ed Kaiser / Edmonton Journal
    The historic industrial property on 96th Street near 104th Avenue was built in 1909 and has always been part of renewal plans in The Quarters, the city’s redevelopment project east of downtown.
    “It’s one of the few remaining industrial buildings in Edmonton,” said Mary Ann Debrinski, director of urban renewal. “It has one of the city’s oldest overhead cranes in it. It’s well-lit with high ceilings. It’s beautiful inside.”
    The city has been trying to buy the land since 2007 but couldn’t agree on a fair market price with the owners. In the meantime, the owner has gone into receivership. A lawyer for the court-appointed receiver came to city hall Thursday and argued the city had no right to continue proceedings while a stay of proceedings is in place.
    Councillors voted to start expropriation anyway, while directing administration to ensure all legal requirements are satisfied. The plan needs to be ratified by full council Friday.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  2. #2

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    Why of all the old buildings we have do we wanna save this place? it looks trashy as hell i would much rather have the tegler building if it ment them tearing this one down

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    Just because something is old, does that make it historic?

    What is the historic value of this place other than its past industrial use?

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    I would be curious to see what it looks like on the inside; I hear it's much different compared to the exterior.
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    ^this I believe and the fact that we have very few of anything historic left.
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    Muttart Lands, The Quarters - I think saving this, the city is looking at the big picture of what the area is becoming.

    That area truly is at a turning point - some of the last affordable river valley located this close to DT and LRT.

    I'm pleased they are protecting a little history.

  7. #7

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    This is not the side(in the picture) that faces the street. In perspective I would compare to the building original joes is in on 102ave except this is way nicer in the front

  8. #8

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    Yes please.

    Front


    Back
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  9. #9

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    The front of the building may be worth saving. It certainly does not have the significance of the old Tegler building or the old downtown library that both were torn down.


    cbc


    Too much of the building is a hodge podge of add ons, facades and modifications. Not much use in saving the back end. Also it has a lot of soil and building contamination issues. The COE looks like they want to save whatever is left (such as the Capital Packers chimney) and are throwing money into bad ideas thinking they are doing a good thing.
    Last edited by Edmonton PRT; 30-11-2015 at 05:38 PM.
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  10. #10

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    Beautiful buildings could be restored, assuming in good shape. Cities do this all the time. That kind of history and character can not be recreated. At very least save the brick facade.

    Character buildings like this are renovated at very low cost all the time in other cities. Just have to be creative.
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  11. #11

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    Wow!

    We have that? We have to do that. Is that back section double-floor height? It was industrial. That could be a very fun venue. A great spur to rejuvenating the neighbourhood.

    I wonder if this is where our oldest manhole covers and streetlights were manufactured.
    Let's make Edmonton better.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Legion View Post
    Why of all the old buildings we have do we wanna save this place? it looks trashy as hell i would much rather have the tegler building if it ment them tearing this one down
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaerdo View Post
    Just because something is old, does that make it historic?

    What is the historic value of this place other than its past industrial use?
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    I may be mistaken, but I don't think any of what's shown in this photo would be saved. This appears to be a much later built annex, if not a separate building.
    Let's make Edmonton better.

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    City of Edmonton pushes to save historic Iron Works building

    Metro:
    http://www.metronews.ca/news/edmonto...-building.html

    CTV:
    http://edmonton.ctvnews.ca/city-look...oyle-1.2927464

    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
    Too much of the building is a hodge podge of add ons, facades and modifications. Not much use in saving the back end. Also it has a lot of soil and building contamination issues. The COE looks like they want to save whatever is left (such as the Capital Packers chimney) and are throwing money into bad ideas thinking they are doing a good thing.
    Top_Dawg has to agree.

    Typical CofE.

    This is gonna turn into a fuqing nightmare.

    The site has to be balls deep in solvents, sludges, battery acid, etc.

    Unbelievable that they are even thinking about this.

  15. #15
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    Yep, the're a 15' deep office that's worth saving, the rest looks like it was essentially a temporary/low cost building when it was built 80 years ago.

    The rest is a single-level industrial building, not a multi-level warehouse that can be easily converted to productive use where the "character" (old brick) can be appreciated.

    If there's ever a need for a wide-span character building in the neighbourhood to serve as a community space/indoor market or whatever the city owns a nice one on 94st in the maintenance yards.

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    You mean this one?:
    https://www.google.ca/maps/@53.55125...7i13312!8i6656

    Those maintenance yards would have huge potential if we built an LRT stop just east of 95 St.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Top_Dawg View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
    Too much of the building is a hodge podge of add ons, facades and modifications. Not much use in saving the back end. Also it has a lot of soil and building contamination issues. The COE looks like they want to save whatever is left (such as the Capital Packers chimney) and are throwing money into bad ideas thinking they are doing a good thing.
    Top_Dawg has to agree.

    Typical CofE.

    This is gonna turn into a fuqing nightmare.

    The site has to be balls deep in solvents, sludges, battery acid, etc.

    Unbelievable that they are even thinking about this.
    I was in the building several times in the 80's and it was a wreck then and lots of lead and heavy metals.

    As highlander said, the front building may be worth saving, the rest is a toxic skeleton.
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    I know that the façade approach isn't a favorite of a number of people, but maybe that might have to be the agreement with the owner of the building. Fine tear it down but the orginal façade is required to be saved and used in a new building.
    LRT is our future, time to push forward.

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    How about Fort Edmonton?

  20. #20

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    Building could be easily kept as is with new electrical and mechanical for simple uses like a vintage market, art space, creative office space, etc. It's what they do in other cities. Putting a good building into a museum is the last thing we should be doing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Titanium48 View Post
    You mean this one?:
    https://www.google.ca/maps/@53.55125...7i13312!8i6656

    Those maintenance yards would have huge potential if we built an LRT stop just east of 95 St.
    Yeah, that one.

    I would love to see a side-platform LRT station built there, and the city yards and parking lots all redeveloped. That building is way better suited to be a "vintage market, etc" than the back end of the Iron Works Building.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenSPACE View Post
    Building could be easily kept as is with new electrical and mechanical for simple uses like a vintage market, art space, creative office space, etc. It's what they do in other cities. Putting a good building into a museum is the last thing we should be doing.
    Is it really a good building, though? I like messy old character, but we're talking about a single-story industrial building with zero ornamentation past the first 15 feet.

  23. #23

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    ^I agree to an extent, just I think we're way to quick to tear things down that can never be rebuilt because it doesn't serve our purposes in the present. They just don't do that in other cities.
    www.decl.org

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    What about something like the Evergreen Brick Works in Toronto?

    https://www.evergreen.ca/get-involve...n-brick-works/
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    What amazes me is that Edmonton trashed it's core, and slapped up the boxes we now must stare at. And what we have left to preserve is a scrap yard office block? On my trip East to Winnipeg, I saw incredible examples of re-purposing old structures. The powerhouse for the back shops at the CN Station DT is a TV station.A pump house that once supplied water to the warehouses is now a riverside restaurant.The freight sheds are markets. The old engine house is the children's museum. And on and on. Winnipeg GETS it. It is a money maker for the city and attracts tourist world wide. This city BLEW it. We had incredible architecture here and threw it away. All one needs to see is a pic from the 80's and today to see how narrow minded this city IS!!! A scrap yard......Well it's better than nothing. Oh but wait...the nimbys... I can just hear them......
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    Yep. Can't do a whole lot about it now sadly. We need to remember this lesson for future building we consider destroying for something "bright shiny and new."

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    http://www.winnipegsun.com/2016/09/0...-fortune-block This is what Winnipeg does. And why it is well noticed.
    Make the RIGHT choice before you take your last breath......

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    Economic stagnation helps as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cnr67 View Post
    What amazes me is that Edmonton trashed it's core, and slapped up the boxes we now must stare at. And what we have left to preserve is a scrap yard office block? On my trip East to Winnipeg, I saw incredible examples of re-purposing old structures. The powerhouse for the back shops at the CN Station DT is a TV station.A pump house that once supplied water to the warehouses is now a riverside restaurant.The freight sheds are markets. The old engine house is the children's museum. And on and on. Winnipeg GETS it. It is a money maker for the city and attracts tourist world wide. This city BLEW it. We had incredible architecture here and threw it away. All one needs to see is a pic from the 80's and today to see how narrow minded this city IS!!! A scrap yard......Well it's better than nothing. Oh but wait...the nimbys... I can just hear them......
    I've been hanging around Vancouver the past few days and there is such character to this city. Just seeing the Carnegie Library bldg made me think of how Edmontons was torn down. Even with all the glass towers here there are thousands of old buildings. It's awesome. Granville St at night with the tall neon signs on the old hotels, how cool. Edmonton has literally torn down it's heart and soul and the only chance of ever bringing some of it back would be the building of replicas. As an older guy that remembers, and seeing the hundreds of empty lots where the buildings stood pretty well brings a guy to tears. Sad. I'm just thankful that there are places like Vancouver to go to to experience the total mix of new with old, the vitality and urban experience. Such a great city.
    Last edited by Drumbones; 08-09-2016 at 10:46 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by etownboarder View Post
    Yep. Can't do a whole lot about it now sadly. We need to remember this lesson for future building we consider destroying for something "bright shiny and new."
    Eventually the bright shiny and new will be old and dull, and possibly worth keeping.

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    Winnipeg was the third largest city in the Country from the turn of the last century to 1957ish.

    Edmonton was a pipsqueak. Calgary was a pipsqueak. We were smaller than Lethbridge is now. We were smaller than Windsor and Sherbrooke back then. We did not ever ever ever have a comparable resource in that period's architecture to the magnificence of Winnipeg.

    Never.

    I may be a bit boosterish in brush, but only what I can backup in basis. Edmonton early 1900's vs Winnipeg? Not touching that with a ten foot pole.
    Let's make Edmonton better.

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    Postwar North America was caught up in a movement of modernism, urban renewal and accommodating the automobile. Unfortunately for Edmonton, the city had a smaller inventory of "historical" buildings to work with relative to other cities and could not afford to lose the buildings that it did.

    An example of this tide was New York city's proposed Lower Manhattan Expressway from the 1960s would have destroyed what is now known as SOHO and a large swath of Little Italy. It would have also destroyed many of the finest collection of cast iron buildings from the 19th century.
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    Postwar North America was caught up in a movement of modernism, urban renewal and accommodating the automobile. Unfortunately for Edmonton, the city had a smaller inventory of "historical" buildings to work with relative to other cities and could not afford to lose the buildings that it did.

    An example of this tide was New York city's proposed Lower Manhattan Expressway from the 1960s which would have destroyed what is now known as SOHO and a large swath of Little Italy. It would have also destroyed many of the finest collection of cast iron buildings from the 19th century.
    Did my dog just fall into a pothole???

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cnr67 View Post
    What amazes me is that Edmonton trashed it's core, and slapped up the boxes we now must stare at. And what we have left to preserve is a scrap yard office block? On my trip East to Winnipeg, I saw incredible examples of re-purposing old structures. The powerhouse for the back shops at the CN Station DT is a TV station.A pump house that once supplied water to the warehouses is now a riverside restaurant.The freight sheds are markets. The old engine house is the children's museum. And on and on. Winnipeg GETS it. It is a money maker for the city and attracts tourist world wide. This city BLEW it. We had incredible architecture here and threw it away. All one needs to see is a pic from the 80's and today to see how narrow minded this city IS!!! A scrap yard......Well it's better than nothing. Oh but wait...the nimbys... I can just hear them......
    I've been hanging around Vancouver the past few days and there is such character to this city. Just seeing the Carnegie Library bldg made me think of how Edmonton's was torn down. Even with all the glass towers here there are thousands of old buildings. It's awesome. Granville St at night with the tall neon signs on the old hotels, how cool. Edmonton has literally torn down it's heart and soul and the only chance of ever bringing some of it back would be the building of replicas. As an older guy that remembers, and seeing the hundreds of empty lots where the buildings stood pretty well brings a guy to tears. Sad. I'm just thankful that there are places like Vancouver to go to to experience the total mix of new with old, the vitality and urban experience. Such a great city.
    I visited Van on several occasions. It is an amazing example of how a large metropolitan city incorporates it's heritage into a modern city. Certainly one of the most interesting cities I've ever visited. As for the Iron Works...Save it and re purpose before it along with so many others is mere "history"
    Make the RIGHT choice before you take your last breath......

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    Quote Originally Posted by cnr67 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cnr67 View Post
    What amazes me is that Edmonton trashed it's core, and slapped up the boxes we now must stare at. And what we have left to preserve is a scrap yard office block? On my trip East to Winnipeg, I saw incredible examples of re-purposing old structures. The powerhouse for the back shops at the CN Station DT is a TV station.A pump house that once supplied water to the warehouses is now a riverside restaurant.The freight sheds are markets. The old engine house is the children's museum. And on and on. Winnipeg GETS it. It is a money maker for the city and attracts tourist world wide. This city BLEW it. We had incredible architecture here and threw it away. All one needs to see is a pic from the 80's and today to see how narrow minded this city IS!!! A scrap yard......Well it's better than nothing. Oh but wait...the nimbys... I can just hear them......
    I've been hanging around Vancouver the past few days and there is such character to this city. Just seeing the Carnegie Library bldg made me think of how Edmonton's was torn down. Even with all the glass towers here there are thousands of old buildings. It's awesome. Granville St at night with the tall neon signs on the old hotels, how cool. Edmonton has literally torn down it's heart and soul and the only chance of ever bringing some of it back would be the building of replicas. As an older guy that remembers, and seeing the hundreds of empty lots where the buildings stood pretty well brings a guy to tears. Sad. I'm just thankful that there are places like Vancouver to go to to experience the total mix of new with old, the vitality and urban experience. Such a great city.
    I visited Van on several occasions. It is an amazing example of how a large metropolitan city incorporates it's heritage into a modern city. Certainly one of the most interesting cities I've ever visited. As for the Iron Works...Save it and re purpose before it along with so many others is mere "history"
    expropriate a scrap yard to save the iron works building.

    and allow the koermann block to be demolished for a scrap of inappropriate facadism.

    pardon the pun but the irony is palpable...
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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