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Thread: Exercise Pegasus Strike

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    Default Exercise Pegasus Strike



    This video shows a glimpse into the work leading up to a jump.
    From the Youtube description:
    Paratroopers of Third Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (3 PPCLI) conducted a jump into CFB Wainwright, Alberta on 1 December 2015. They were participating in EXERCISE PEGASUS STRIKE, a tactical rehearsal for arctic operations. The troops assembled at Edmonton Garrison in 3 PPCLI headquarters at 0200 hours, then drove to a hangar at Edmonton International Airport where they helped each other don their equipment.

    Flight crews with 426 Squadron (based at CFB Trenton) operating two Hercules CC-130J aircraft flew the paratroopers to their drop zone at CFB Wainwright. The two planes took off shortly before 0900 hours and 30 minutes later, the Jump Master shouted his commands: “Look This Way. Stand Up. Hook Up. Check Your Equipment.”

    The Hercules Load Masters opened both side doors and the chilly wind blast added to the thunderous propeller drone. Everybody waited for the green light, then the Jump Master gave the signal: Go. Within seconds, all paratroopers jumped to their objective. Immediately upon landing, they were on foot using fire and movement to capture a bridge held by simulated enemy forces.

    As that was happening, the two Hercules aircraft flew to the Rocky Mountains (Jasper area) to conduct several hours of contour flying. They flew at 600 knots per hour, frequently descending to about 300 feet above ground level. Then suddenly lurching upwards with a sharp bank to the left or right, depending on the terrain. After the contour flying exercise was completed, the planes returned to Edmonton International Airport. Video by Grant Cree, Veritas Studios Inc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Carbon-14 View Post
    . They flew at 600 knots per hour , frequently descending to about 300 feet above ground level. Then suddenly lurching upwards with a sharp bank to the left or right, depending on the terrain. After the contour flying exercise was completed, the planes returned to Edmonton International Airport. Video by Grant Cree, Veritas Studios Inc.
    600 knots? In a Herc?

    I think that is a type-o. MAYBE 600 km/h. 600KAIS would sheer the wings off.

    Speed of sound...sea level...~666 knots...

    Otherwise...one hell of a Herc then! I want that one to do a low pass at 600KAIS at the airshow this August!

    Published top speed C130J is ~670 km/h...or ~348 knots...
    Tired of being taken advantage of .

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    I'm always amazed at how low they jump, I guess to limit the time in which they are vulnerable (in WWII the Germans paratroopers took a hammering in the air at Crete - so bad, they never went into action again in an airborne strike).

    I parachuted some years ago at 4,000 feet, which was very leisurely compared to what these guys and girls do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardS View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Carbon-14 View Post
    . They flew at 600 knots per hour , frequently descending to about 300 feet above ground level. Then suddenly lurching upwards with a sharp bank to the left or right, depending on the terrain. After the contour flying exercise was completed, the planes returned to Edmonton International Airport. Video by Grant Cree, Veritas Studios Inc.
    600 knots? In a Herc?

    I think that is a type-o. MAYBE 600 km/h. 600KAIS would sheer the wings off.

    Speed of sound...sea level...~666 knots...

    Otherwise...one hell of a Herc then! I want that one to do a low pass at 600KAIS at the airshow this August!

    Published top speed C130J is ~670 km/h...or ~348 knots...
    Those CC-130 pilots sure do love to push their aircraft to their limits and beyond! But yeah, probably a typo.

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