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Thread: How many former leaders have stuck around?

  1. #1

    Default How many former leaders have stuck around?

    Like the captains of ships were traditionally the first ones to jump ship when trouble arose, I've long felt that 'we the citizens' repeatedly get to be the chumps that live and die base their short-sighted decisions.

    So I'm always curious as to what proportion of our former leaders (corporate, political, etc.) stay for the long-run and how many retire abroad, leave, jump ship, pursue riches somewhere else, etc., etc., etc.

    So has anyone have anecdotal views of what proportion of our leaders, executives, etc. have tended to stick around to face the consequences of their decision making?



    ---- MINIMIZE THE DETAILS PLEASE - THIS ISN'T A STALKING THREAD ----

  2. #2
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    Stephane Dion was leader of the Liberal party, now a cabinet member under Trudeau. Can't think of too many others though. Provincially hmm, my mind is blank.

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    I would bet a lot but it's going to be a difficult question to answer because once you're out of public life there's not generally any reporting on you.

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

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    Both Lougheed and Klein stuck around in Alberta the rest of their lives and died in Calgary. Lougheed particularly never shied away from commenting. Klein wasn't in much of a state to comment quickly after leaving office.

    Getty as far as I know lives in Alberta but really did "retire from politics" as you don't hear a peep from him.

    Ernest Manning served as a federal senator, but lived out the end of his life in Alberta.

    Strom went back to farming for the rest of his life, but did stick around in politics for a number of years before that.

    Bible Bill died in Vancouver, but I think he actually lived in Alberta still and was only visiting there.

    I don't know about the other very early leaders other than Rutherford, who of course stayed in Alberta to run the U of A.

    Ed Stelmach is still in the province and has made a few comments (including support for the NDP). [If I can make a side point here, I think the conservatives would still be in power if the oil barons in the conservative party HQ hadn't turfed Ed for Redford.]

    Redford refused to show up for MLA duty after being turfed. As far as I know she lives in Calgary but has obviously made herself scarce since "the events".

    Prentice has jumped ship for a think tank in D.C.

    So apart from the recent PC "bad picks", most of our leaders stuck around Alberta, and most of them continued with some sort of public life.
    Last edited by Jaerdo; 10-02-2016 at 01:04 PM.

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    I believe Jan Reimer still lives in Edmonton.

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  6. #6

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    So far the results are a big vote in favour of staying vs. bailing. Still, I like to hang onto my preconceived notions right to the bitter end.

    How about corporate executives, government execs, etc? There were those people they parachuted into health care leadership roles and then gave million dollar golden handshakes to a short while later. However, I hear that the guy from Telus is back in charge of Telus so that's another positive vote (don't know if he'd stayed or gone in the interim). But good on him since our Shaw leadership took their toys and left for Calgary. Oh, and there that arena guy that apparently left.. But clearly left with us a great new toy...

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    People go where there is work for them. High level execs are going to move to where they can get comparable jobs.

    As for retirement, lots of people, not matter what their job(s) were, retire away from here.

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
    People go where there is work for them. High level execs are going to move to where they can get comparable jobs.

    As for retirement, lots of people, not matter what their job(s) were, retire away from here.
    The man at the top of Husky, which is laying off big time, had annual compensation I believe of around $8 million recently. I'd say that after a few years of that, they could easily afford to skip the search for comparable jobs to stay and perform other services to their home base. I imagine many will, if they are let go by their boards for poor performance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
    People go where there is work for them. High level execs are going to move to where they can get comparable jobs.

    As for retirement, lots of people, not matter what their job(s) were, retire away from here.
    The man at the top of Husky, which is laying off big time, had annual compensation I believe of around $8 million recently. I'd say that after a few years of that, they could easily afford to skip the search for comparable jobs to stay and perform other services to their home base. I imagine many will, if they are let go by their boards for poor performance.
    Why would someone skip jobs they enjoy and want to do just to stay in one area and do jobs they're less interested in?

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
    People go where there is work for them. High level execs are going to move to where they can get comparable jobs.

    As for retirement, lots of people, not matter what their job(s) were, retire away from here.
    The man at the top of Husky, which is laying off big time, had annual compensation I believe of around $8 million recently. I'd say that after a few years of that, they could easily afford to skip the search for comparable jobs to stay and perform other services to their home base. I imagine many will, if they are let go by their boards for poor performance.
    Why would someone skip jobs they enjoy and want to do just to stay in one area and do jobs they're less interested in?
    Because there's more to life...

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    More to life than finding the things you love to do and doing them?

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

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    Well, some will seek variety (spice of life an' all) and will have the means to indulge themselves anywhere in the world.
    Nisi Dominus Frustra

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaerdo View Post
    Bible Bill died in Vancouver, but I think he actually lived in Alberta still and was only visiting there.
    Yes. He was visiting his daughter on the coast when he died. But his wife decided to bury him in Burnaby because that's where she was planning to retire.

    I also recall reading that his wife wanted him there because she thought that he had been hated in Alberta(true, at least in some circles). Maybe it was the animosity that made his wife want to move away, and his dying in Vancouver just made it all the easier.
    Last edited by overoceans; 11-02-2016 at 12:53 AM.

  14. #14

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    Provincially, former NDP leader Brian Mason is now provincial minister of infrastructure.
    Let's make Edmonton better.

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    I'll give you anecdotal.


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    Peter Lougheed was the Chancellor of Queen's University between 1996 and 2002. I would assume that this job entailed spending a significant amount of time in Ontario.

  17. #17

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    Peter Pocklington moved on from the city that made him successful.

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    Should have talked Peter into staying and gave him a rich partner, maybe we would still be winning Stanley Cups. lol

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    John Brownlee remained in Alberta after his premiership, despite being regarded by much of the province as a fiendish seducer of teenaged girls.

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    R.B. Bennett who had been both leader of the provincial Tories and Prime Minister of Canada, permanently relocated to the UK a few years after his defeat in the 1935 federal election.

  21. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    So far the results are a big vote in favour of staying vs. bailing. Still, I like to hang onto my preconceived notions right to the bitter end.

    How about corporate executives, government execs, etc? There were those people they parachuted into health care leadership roles and then gave million dollar golden handshakes to a short while later.
    Bill Comrie is long gone.

    As far as government execs go, I'm not too sure. I know quite a few of Premier Notley's high-level staffers came from elsewhere, so it'll be interesting to see what happens to them if the government changes...

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    Quote Originally Posted by overoceans View Post
    John Brownlee remained in Alberta after his premiership, despite being regarded by much of the province as a fiendish seducer of teenaged girls.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_E...ee_sex_scandal Wow, first time I learned of this. They didn't teach this at Pigeon Lake Regional High. lol So this is what caused the demise of the UFA.

  23. #23

    Default How many former leaders have stuck around

    Most of the comments seem to be that political leaders stick around, or go back to where they were from originally. Most don't leave the country or the province, I would agree with that.

    I believe Brian Mulroney went back to Montreal after he retired from politics and is still there. Every once and a while he comments on something political. Fun fact and interestingly, I believe his daughter in law and Justin Trudeau's wife are good acquaintances.

    I think Kim Campbell went back to BC after she was defeated, then to the US for a while, but after that back to Canada and was working at the U of A here in Edmonton. I am not sure if she is still here now.

    I believe Stephen Harper has now moved back to Calgary and I think the other living former Alberta Prime Minister, Joe Clark is there too. Somehow I don't think they get together much. Haha.

    I believe the comment about Don Getty is correct. I think he is still living in Edmonton, despite losing his seat in Edmonton Whitemud in the 1989 election, which was a rebuke at the time. However, I guess he didn't take it too personally or eventually got over it.

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave View Post
    I believe Stephen Harper has now moved back to Calgary
    You are correct - he can be spotted there, or at Shake Shack in Las Vegas, apparently.

    http://news.nationalpost.com/news/ca...prime-minister

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by overoceans View Post
    John Brownlee remained in Alberta after his premiership, despite being regarded by much of the province as a fiendish seducer of teenaged girls.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_E...ee_sex_scandal Wow, first time I learned of this. They didn't teach this at Pigeon Lake Regional High. lol So this is what caused the demise of the UFA.
    Well, there was also the Great Depression, in full swing by 1935, which would have made voters more receptive to Aberhart's promises of economic relief. I'd be intersted to know what factor historians think played the bigger role.

    And, yeah, it's actually surprising how little-known the Brownlee Affair is, considering the relative paucity of sex scandals in Canadian politics.

  26. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by overoceans View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by overoceans View Post
    John Brownlee remained in Alberta after his premiership, despite being regarded by much of the province as a fiendish seducer of teenaged girls.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_E...ee_sex_scandal Wow, first time I learned of this. They didn't teach this at Pigeon Lake Regional High. lol So this is what caused the demise of the UFA.
    Well, there was also the Great Depression, in full swing by 1935, which would have made voters more receptive to Aberhart's promises of economic relief. I'd be intersted to know what factor historians think played the bigger role.

    And, yeah, it's actually surprising how little-known the Brownlee Affair is, considering the relative paucity of sex scandals in Canadian politics.
    And no calls for renaming things...

    Am I right? A quick google indicates that family justice offices are in the John E Brownlee building.

    Also note: victims don't get Wikipedia pages.
    Last edited by KC; 12-02-2016 at 07:21 AM.

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    Given the building was built long after he died I expect the scandal had long since faded from popular memory.

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

  28. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
    Given the building was built long after he died I expect the scandal had long since faded from popular memory.
    Or times have changed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
    Given the building was built long after he died I expect the scandal had long since faded from popular memory.
    Or times have changed.
    Thing is, there isn't much about Brownlee that IS remembered, apart from the scandal. Though apparently he was the one who negotiated the province's control over natural resources, so I guess the people who named the building might have been thinking of that.

    But yeah, the "Family Justice" offices being there is kinda funny. "Child Protection" would be even worse, though.

    That said...

    Also note: victims don't get Wikipedia pages.
    I don't know if Virginia MacMillan would be considered a victim by contemporary standards. When was the last time anyone was sued for "seduction"?

  30. #30

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    Diefenbaker stuck around as an MP until he died in 1979.

  31. #31

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    Did I hear right, Harper is looking a jobs with American companies?

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    Based on the reports it's more like American companies are offering him jobs. He hasn't said anything himself, nor are there reports of him looking for jobs.

    I would bet he goes the route of setting up a think tank of some sort.

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

  33. #33

    Default How many former leaders have stuck around?

    The news reports I heard seemed vague about whether it was Harper who was looking for those particular jobs or they were being offered to him. Perhaps it was a bit of both.

    I have mixed feelings about this. While I am not a Harper fan, I thought it might be better for the party if he stuck around. The Conservative party was largely his creation and vision so he could have provided some wisdom and guidance to the next leader. However, perhaps he didn't want to turn into Diefenbaker - somewhat respected, but also largely ignored. I suppose it gives the Conservative party more freedom to go in a different direction in the future. Perhaps that is what Conservative MP's want.

    Interestingly, this announcement was made right after the Senator trials and investigations were wrapped up. Some have suggested he stuck around until after the Senator trials and investigations were completed, so he could invoke parliamentary privilege, just in case he was called to testify in an appeal or trial.

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    CBC is the origin of those reports:

    Harper has offers from multiple U.S. companies, including private equity giant KKR, sources tell CBC News.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/step...tics-1.3598913

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

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    From what I've heard the CPC does not want Harper to stick around. There's even talk of implementing term limits on future party leaders in reaction to what happened with him.

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

  36. #36

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    Well call me whatever you do, but it was always apparent to me that Harper hated Canada.

    He was basically R. B. Bennett for a new generation.

    "as a politician he was a failure".[2] J. L. Granatstein and Norman Hillmer, comparing him to all other Canadian prime ministers concluded, "Bennett utterly failed as a leader. Everyone was alienated by the end—Cabinet, caucus, party, voter and foreigner."[3]
    Let's make Edmonton better.

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    Harper started out with a mixed bag of really good ideas (predictable yet strong regulatory systems, user/polluter pays instead of income taxes, decentralization, foreign policy to expand Canada's trading impact, support for small business, etc), but he is the archetype of a politician corrupted by the insatiable desire for more power.

    He sold out everything in exchange for funding and control over every minute aspect of the government.

    Instead of a firm and predictable regulatory system we got a completely unpredictable system with exceptions handed out like candy to every big corporation that came knocking on the door.

    Instead of support for small business we got a slanted tax and regulatory system that allowed big players to gobble everything up and leech our economy of its lifeblood.

    Instead of an efficient government we got a pointless labyrinth of bureaucracy designed to ensure every communication would flow through the dear leader.

    Instead of decentralized authority to provinces we got one of the most directed, centralized, and authoritarian grant regimes ever - with every single project no matter how small approved for political impact by the PMO.

    Instead of Canada emergent on the global stage, we got lopsided trade deals and a position as a global laughingstock, locked out of negotiations and global events.

    Harper was truly one of our worst leaders. I don't think he hated Canada, I think he sold out everything he believed in for power.

  38. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaerdo View Post
    Instead of an efficient government we got a pointless labyrinth of bureaucracy designed to ensure every communication would flow through the dear leader.
    How is this different from your hero Trudeau, who won't even let the media come along on a visit to a first nations band?

    Its interesting reading your list of "hates", many of them for me would be "loves". Why on earth for example would we want to waste money on a seat on the UN security council, something Trudeau can't achieve anyway because he is continuing to unreservedly support Israel? When I was in NZ, Canada was always considered a bit of a laughing stock because of the way it stupidly funds any request from the UN / always does the academic "right thing" (except when it comes to issues that really matter, like supporting the people of Palestine), which usually means paying lots of money to other people to waste. I thought it was nice to have a PM a little more realistic about the world (albeit still flawed on Israel), we are back to funding big perks for UN bureaucrats though, ahead of people who actually need the help. Canada is back to being a laughing stock to all but the academic elites, never mind, the internal love fest will end eventually.

    Its interesting seeing the cold reception Trudeau has got in Japan, where they aren't impressed by his love fest with China, an oppressive communist regime, ahead of democracies in the region. I'm looking forward to seeing Trudeau meet the Dalia Lama like Harper did, or speak out about the rights of activists in China. Oh, hold on, we won't see that happen will we? That would upset China...
    Last edited by moahunter; 27-05-2016 at 10:17 AM.

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