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Thread: How a family of 4 stays sane in a 1-bedroom condo

  1. #1
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    Default How a family of 4 stays sane in a 1-bedroom condo

    How a family of 4 stays sane in a 1-bedroom condo in Toronto
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toront...acks-1.3828968


    Same hacks could apply in downtown of any city.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  2. #2

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    Kids grow. His toddler bed "hack" is useless for an 11 year old.

    Screw "hacks". The CoE needs to demand developments provide affordable, family friendly housing options. Downtown and in the surrounding first ring suburbs.

  3. #3

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    Step 1: Get rid of 90%+ of your stuff
    Step 2: Create prison-cell-cum-child-kennel only suitable for extremely young children

    Yeah, it'd work in any city for the hyperbohemian artist types that are okay living a neo-ascetic life. That doesn't really jive with the rank & file Albertans that make up the majority of our fair city.

    Neat article though, but about as relevant to most Edmontonians as a guide on how to live on a sailboat.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  4. #4

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    It's funny seeing articles posted about raising a family by people who live on their own with no kids.

  5. #5

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    Interesting what ridiculous housing costs do to creative people.

    They do show how much can be squeezed out of our typically inefficient floorplans though.
    Let's make Edmonton better.

  6. #6

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    700sf is almost considered luxurious in central parts of Asian cities...

  7. #7

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    a) So what?

    b) Of course. 700 square feet designed for a family could work just fine. 700sf designed for a professional couple is useless for a family.

    A family of eight was raised in the 900sf bungalow my family of four now occupies. Plenty of space.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by B.ike View Post
    700sf is almost considered luxurious in central parts of Asian cities...
    The last time I checked, we were are not talking about about central parts of asian cities. Space isn't at a premimum and we do not have the massive overpopulation that many asian cities face.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    The last time I checked, we were are not talking about about central parts of asian cities. Space isn't at a premimum and we do not have the massive overpopulation that many asian cities face.
    Well we can agree we are talking about Toronto. Toronto (non GTA) itself is approximately the same land area as Edmonton but has over 3x the population of Edmonton. Space isn't SCARCE. But it is at a premium as this article suggests.

    Toronto is going through what all major worldwide cities have to do when land is at a premium...you build up. And when the standard unit becomes too expensive, the units get smaller so they can become "affordable". Rinse and repeat. Give it another decade, and we'll see an article about raising a family in a 600sf condo.

    We should look to other cities than have undergone this transformation and try to learn from it - such as effective layout designs of buildings, community amenities, etc.

  10. #10

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    Except land isn't & won't be scarce in Edmonton any time soon. There's literally 40 years of suburban development & new neighbourhoods approved & in the pipeline already. Even if we jam on the brakes now, it's gonna take quite some time for that momentum to stop.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  11. #11

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    ^true you are. Edmonton is nowhere near Toronto and it will never become what Toronto is today.

    Quote Originally Posted by ajs View Post
    a) So what?

    b) Of course. 700 square feet designed for a family could work just fine. 700sf designed for a professional couple is useless for a family.

    A family of eight was raised in the 900sf bungalow my family of four now occupies. Plenty of space.
    That was exactly my reaction to the article. And what I posted was a reaction to that. So what....its a reflection of where you live. Midwest states, you have sprawling lots and live the American Dream. Move to the coast and you end up in smaller places with the same money. Go to the popular coastal cities like NYC, SF, Seattle, and the same money gets you a shoebox in a tower. The smaller the space, the more creative you have to be in order to adapt to your needs.

  12. #12

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    Central Toronto is becoming a lot like a Eurasian metropolis and for the same reasons. Sheer numbers of humans, sheer distances to travel to jobs, etc. The comparison seems apt to me.

    Edmonton, in addition to being a fifth the size currently, is also radial in form, while Toronto is squished up against a lake. This should afford Edmonton twice the size before experiencing the same economics in the Central areas.

    I.e., no, not anytime soon.


    That said, it sure would be neat to see more condos designed for families, or at least 'open plan' so they could be more easily adapted by whichever household happens to be in residence.
    Let's make Edmonton better.

  13. #13

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    Reality check


    Here is a NFB documentary from 1967 on how people scraped by with 9 children and a 10th on the way living in Montreal in a rented apartment

    One of the first ever documentaries of real people's lives. Absolutely one of the most interesting films of it's kind

    The Things I Cannot Change


    Tanya Ballantyne 1967 | 55 min Full Length version https://www.nfb.ca/film/things_i_cannot_change/

    Watch the full length version where you see how the police handle the rich vs the poor

    Excerpt


    This feature documentary is considered to be the forerunner of the NFB's Challenge for Change Program. The film offers in inside look at 3 weeks in the life of the Bailey family. Trouble with the police, begging for stale bread, and the birth of another child are just some of the issues they face. Through it all, the father tries to explain his family's predicament. Although filmed in Montreal, the film offers an anatomy of poverty as it occurs throughout North America.
    Last edited by Edmonton PRT; 03-11-2016 at 12:11 PM.
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  14. #14

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    Reality check?
    Let's make Edmonton better.

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    Its been happening a lot in Vancouver but now here in Edmonton. Rent free for the right *cough-cough* woman for girlfriend services. Sounds like prostitution to me.
    Mom said I should not talk to cretins!

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by JayBee View Post
    Reality check?
    Yes, back then families did not have as much stuff and we did not live in monster homes.
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  17. #17
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    Ever hear of the idiom "Keeping up with the Jones's?" I don't mean the comic strip or the tv show either. That idiom applied to the 1960's-70's culture. "Everyone wants what the next guy's got."
    Mom said I should not talk to cretins!

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