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Thread: Edmonton is too “sexy"

  1. #1
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    Default Edmonton is too “sexy"

    Edmonton is too "sexy"

    Edmonton the “Sexual Assault Capital of Canada,” is quite different from our welcome to Edmonton “City of Champions” catch phrase but this beautiful city’s dirty little shame took this title in 1975. With the highest sexual assault rate per capita, something had to happen.

    A year later, the sexual assault centre of Edmonton (SACE) began. Its mission statement says it all, the centre exists “to empower individuals affected by sexual abuse and assault, and to empower communities to take action against sexual violence.” Fast-forward 31 years—sadly the centre remains, still fuelled by the love of dedicated volunteers and by the fact that Edmonton remains among the top-ten for sexual assaults in Canada. Societal stigmas still surround sexual violence making this the most under-reported of all crimes and even sadder the most under-supported.

    During 2007 Edmonton budget meetings city council charged Edmonton Economic Development Corporation (EEDC) with making our city look sexy to outsiders. For survivors of sexual violence Edmonton is already too sexy—bad sexy. We have all heard that sex sells, so advertisers and now the City of Edmonton are constantly trying to “sex” things up…but everyone shies away from “bad” sex.

    Instead of talking about “bad” sex, we blame the survivor (you are only a victim immediately after the crime). This mentality is still prevalent in our society and in the fabric of Edmonton life, but sexual violence, sexual assault is not really about sex. It is about violence and control, assault with a sexual component—“bad” sex.

    Statistics estimate that one in every four women and one in every eight men will experience sexual violence at some point in their life.

    • According to Statistics Canada, only 6% of all sexual assaults are reported to the police —the other 94% remain the silent (hurting) majority (Statistics Canada, 1993).

    • It is estimated that over 80% of survivors who are sexually assaulted do not report due to feelings of shame, fear and humiliation or fear of loss of employment/partner or fear of revictimization through the criminal trial process (Fassel, 1994).

    • 21% of students at the University of Alberta reported at least one unwanted sexual experience at some point in their life up until now (Survey of Unwanted Sexual Experience Among University of Alberta Students by LoVerso, 2001).

    • 83% of disabled women will be sexually assaulted in their lifetime (Federal Study of Disabled Canadians, 2003).

    • 39% of Canadian women have experienced at least one incident of sexual assault since the age of 16 (Statistics Canada, 1993).

    • 60% of survivors are victimized again (Statistics Canada, 1993).

    I could give you more statistics and even definitions but these do not recognize the personal devastation and the many ways in which sexual violence occurs. Cold facts and scientific explanations do not recognize the long-term emotional damage, the shame, the pain and the constant fear of survivors. Descriptions and data do not recognize that people are part of these horrible crimes.

    As one of those statistics, I can tell you that the “sexual” aspect of my assault is not what hurt me, the cruel violence on my body and my psyche is what devastated me. The horror that haunts me still is having my innocence and trust in people so brutally taken away. I attach my name to this article for authority; to take it from fiction to non-fiction. You can no longer say “it is not my business” or “I do not know anyone affected by sexual violence.”

    You would think that Edmonton businesses would be interested in supporting survivors of sexual violence, even if only to make them look good as a business. Sadly, as one of those Edmontonians I can attest that support is one of the largest challenges survivors and their supporters face. Edmonton businesses need to realize that helping support survivors helps their community, employees and families. If Edmonton businesses do not begin to realize that this epidemic must stop and be instrumental in working towards a solution, they are technically becoming part of the problem.

    Sexual violence is not an easy topic to talk about. It is an ugly horrifying issue. Most people want to think that sexual violence is somebody else's problem, but it is not. It is everybody's business. Survivors of sexual violence are boys and girls, women and men, young and old. They are our families, our neighbors —they are people we meet everyday in our communities. No one would argue that sexual violence is horrible. Nevertheless, unless we talk about it—unless we confront it directly —there will never be a chance of encouraging people who are survivors to come forward for assistance —of preventing it from happening in the first place. Moreover, if survivors do not talk about it —if they do not come forward for help, we have no way of holding offenders accountable and this puts the safety and integrity of our communities at risk.

    How can you make sexual violence your business? What can you do to help? Support the prosecution of offenders to the fullest extent. Learn about the nature and extent of the issue of sexual violence. Challenge offensive behavior such as sexist language, bragging about sexual conquests or negative comments about an individual's gender. Learn what “consent” is and is not. Talk about and discuss the issue of sexual violence. Be open to hearing about the topic of sexual violence and about other people's experiences of sexual violence. Tell survivors that there is help (and hope) available. You can make a difference. Talk about it. It is your business.

    Edmonton still displays a need for knowledge about sexual violence and I believe that a step toward finding an end to sexual violence starts with ending the silence. Take this article for example, just by writing this I am telling you the reader about this problem and I am breaking the silence. Become part of breaking the silence.

    As I have illustrated sexual violence does not discriminate—it affects people of all genders, races, ages and socio-economic backgrounds. It is tragically very common. As a successful and innovative city, Edmonton is responsible for every sexual violence survivor. Sexual violence can, will or has happened to someone you know. A spouse, a sibling, a parent, a relative, a co-worker, your child or perhaps even to yourself.

    The only way to stop sexual violence and to help those affected by it is through education, awareness and genuine care. The lost dreams and opportunities of survivors of sexual violence have enormous economic impact and long-lasting social impact.

    Now that you know the ways in which our city is hurting and now that you understand that sexual violence is a humanist issue, I hope that you realize that it is something we all as citizens of Edmonton need to take responsibility for. We need to help those whose lives have been shattered by sexual violence and we need to be proactive —we need to stop sexual violence.

    By Debra Ward
    SACE Volunteer of the Year

    Resources in Greater Edmonton

    Edmonton Police Services (EPS): Emergency: 911| Non-Emergency Calls: (780) 423-4567 | TELUS Mobility: #377 | Rogers: *377 | TTY: (780) 425-1231| Switchboard: (780) 421-3333.

    Edmonton Police Victim Service Unit (VSU), 9620 103A Avenue (780) 421-2217 or Alberta Police Based Victim Services Association's (APBVSA) website at www.apbvsa.com.

    Sexual Assault Centre of Edmonton (SACE) offers a 24 Hour Crisis Line (423-4121) that provides support, referrals and information to individuals affected by sexual violence. Public education, diversity outreach and a war rape (compassionate witness) program are also services provided by SACE.

    Sexual Assault Response Team of Edmonton (SARTE) is a group of registered nurses and doctors who have special training in caring for patients who have been sexually assaulted. This is a 24 hour service offered through the emergency rooms of Capital Health Region hospitals. The team is activated when a victim informs the emergency room staff that they have been assaulted. Please note that SARTE services are only available through Capital Health Region hospitals. SARTE offers people (14 years and older) who have been sexually assaulted compassionate, confidential and complete medical care without judgment.

    Sexual Assault Centre (U of A), 2-705 Students' Union Building (SUB) 492-9771. The University of Alberta Sexual Assault Centre, as part of University Student Services, provides a safe place on campus where unconditional support, confidentiality, respect and advocacy are available for those affected by sexual assault. The U of A Sexual Assault Centre strives for a campus community free of sexual violence.

    The Support Network is a safe place to call. 211 or (780) 482-0198 when life hurts. Help lines are free, anonymous, confidential and available every hour, every day.

    Edmonton’s Zebra Child Protection Centre, the first centre of its kind in Canada, enables our community to respond to child abuse with a professional, compassionate and highly integrated program of healing and justice. Zebra gives all of us an opportunity to lend strength to abused children and create an exemplary model for compassion and justice in contending with child abuse.Contact Info: P: (780) 421-2016 or www.zebracentre.ca.

    Sexual Violence Stupid Top-ten List

    I compiled a top-ten list of myths, stupid things and stupid questions people said to me after my disclosure. This will give you an example of why the public needs to be educated and why awareness urgently still needs to happen.

    1. Were they native? Uh, no—they were not even human and what difference would that make.

    2. At least they did not take anything. That is right, I lost my dignity, my spirit and my sense of the future but at least they did not take anything “valuable.”

    3. Did it hurt? Why don’t you try having sex with sandpaper between your legs and then ask me that question.

    4. You do not look any different… Um, am I supposed to get a tattoo proclaiming me a victim? There are scars on my soul that are indelible.

    5. Why would you believe them when they threatened you if you contacted police? Yeah, these were “people” I should trust. They knew where I worked and had only forced horrible depravities upon me…no reason I would think they were capable of anything bad. Nonetheless, I did eventually report to the police. My police file remains open. Never apprehended my assailants are still unknown and unpunished.

    6. What were you wearing; don’t you think that contributed to your attack? Certainly. It was after all almost dusk and the drab trench coat that I was wearing did show off my cast— sexy.

    7. What did you do to provoke the attack? Excuse me? I was leaving work, had a cast on my leg and was an easy target that is it. I was not special; I was simply there and was vulnerable.

    8. Well at least “that” will never happen to you again. Being assaulted once in no way protects me going into the future. Indeed 60% of survivors are victimized again and yet another statistic I lay claim to.

    9. Am I sure I did not consent. Good one, after almost 16 (at that time) years of monogamous marriage one night as I was leaving work I saw some rough looking men and thought—nope— that one does not even warrant a response.

    10. You have to take responsibility. For what??? Being female—sexual assault happens to men as well. My age? Babies and senior citizens are targets too. My appearance. Yeah, my drab trench coat and that grey cast was sooo much of a turn on and nuns who are assaulted—damn their sexy habits. Perpetrators are the only ones who must take responsibility. They choose to assault. It was late at night and you were alone. It was just turning dark on an early fall evening and I was simply leaving work. I did not deserve what happened to me—no survivors do.
    Why do people still ask (accuse) a survivor of sexual violence what they did to deserve the crime but not a victim of a mugging?


    End the silence on sexual violence — end sexual violence.

    By Debra Ward
    Professional Writer and Proud Survivor

  2. #2
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    Default

    I am very biased which I will admit from the start as the author and me are related. She is also the person who got me onto connect2edmonton.

    Her determination to increase awareness on this not very sexy but too sexy issue is unwavering.

    Just as she promotes this site, she does everything she can to get the issue of sexual assault out wherever she can.

  3. #3

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    My one issue with this is that rape has nothing to do with sex, or sexy, or pretty much anything but violence, control and mysogyny.

    Please don't confuse sex and rape in any way.

  4. #4

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    You are right and I actually prefer the word Rape (worthy of capitalization as far as I am concerned) because it is a specific word for a specific act.

    Calling something sexual assault puts the word sex into an act that as you said has absolutely nothing to do with sex and everything to do with assault, violence, domination and control.

    The Canadian Criminal Code does not agree and in their more genteel wording, it is called sexual assault, which is then being broken down into categories that are more specific to the act and severity.

    Rape carries historical implications and is more evocative in my opinion.

    However, whatever the act is called is subjective and I am more interested in putting a stop to it.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Edmonton is too “sexy

    Quote Originally Posted by NoreneS

    You would think that Edmonton businesses would be interested in supporting survivors of sexual violence, even if only to make them look good as a business. Sadly, as one of those Edmontonians I can attest that support is one of the largest challenges survivors and their supporters face. Edmonton businesses need to realize that helping support survivors helps their community, employees and families. If Edmonton businesses do not begin to realize that this epidemic must stop and be instrumental in working towards a solution, they are technically becoming part of the problem.
    Can you explain how Edmonton businesses are not being supportive? Is it a lack of anti-harassment policies, looking the other way when complaints are filed . . . ? Please elaborate.

  6. #6

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    ^ How about all the above and more…

    How about the fact that the sexual assault centre receives no federal or provincial funding instead they are reliant on the United Way (Capital Region) and the City of Edmonton Family and Community Support Services (FCSS) for the bulk of their funding.

    Funding is received from generous benefactors but often these come program specific.

    Very few businesses want to be associated with this issue (sexual violence) and this transfers over to those being connected/supportive of the sexual assault centre wishing to remain anonymous if they do provide assistance of any sort.

    There is still a reasoning of hum, wonder why blankity blanks company is providing money etc. “there” wonder what they are atoning for or who “it” happened to.

  7. #7

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    You can change your world…

    Instead of saying right away that sexual violence does not affect you—listen to others’ experiences of sexual violence and try to let your defenses down.

    Speak up! Challenge those you hear or witness being sexist.

    Stand up for yourself.

    Challenge yourself – what can you do to make Edmonton a place free of sexual violence for yourself and for those around you?

    Question what you’re seeing and doing and try to make Edmonton safe from sexual violence.

  8. #8

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    I believe all Edmontonians must shift from bystander to activist in the struggle to prevent sexual violence and other forms of men's violence in our community.

    Males and the institutions that serve them must work as allies with women in preventing sexual violence and other forms of men's violence. Through awareness-to-action education and community organizing, promoting gender equity and building men's capacity to be strong without being violent.

    I would like to see Edmonton become a concerned community of men and women of all ages, from all socio-economic levels, work for peace, equity and gender justice.

    All Edmontonians should find strength in compassion and nonviolence while striving to support those who are courageous enough to challenge the "rape culture" in which we live.

    I do not believe men's violence is inevitable. I believe that sexual violence, battering and other forms of men's violence are learned behaviors, choices that men make to exert power and control over others that are reinforced by a society that defines manhood through domination.

    I believe that men can unlearn these damaging lessons and live peacefully with women and other men and this in turn will make our communities stronger.

  9. #9

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    There is a thread related to sexual violence specific to chemical castration for pedophiles here:

    http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/forum...317&highlight=

  10. #10

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    This is the link to a thread about sentences for those who commit
    sexual violence with various stories relating to the topic.

    http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/forum...light=perverts

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by djgirl
    ^ How about all the above and more…

    How about the fact that the sexual assault centre receives no federal or provincial funding instead they are reliant on the United Way (Capital Region) and the City of Edmonton Family and Community Support Services (FCSS) for the bulk of their funding.

    Funding is received from generous benefactors but often these come program specific.

    Very few businesses want to be associated with this issue (sexual violence) and this transfers over to those being connected/supportive of the sexual assault centre wishing to remain anonymous if they do provide assistance of any sort.

    There is still a reasoning of hum, wonder why blankity blanks company is providing money etc. “there” wonder what they are atoning for or who “it” happened to.
    ^ I believe in expressing appreciation and while it would be tempting to point fingers at companies whose policies, practices and culture (overtly or surreptitiously) are non-supportive towards this issue and/or SACE that would really accomplish nothing.

    Instead I would like to acknowledge a company who HAS supported SACE and our volunteers—Hole’s Greenhouses in St. Albert has provided numerous beautiful annual planters for several years for the annual volunteer appreciation picnic.

    This seemingly small gesture means a great deal and is appreciated by all the volunteers and staff as it is an expression of thank you and encouragement in too often thankless endeavours.

    So from one of those volunteers THANK YOU to Hole’s Greenhouses, the petunias planters are lovely and appreciated as is your support.


  12. #12
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    Holes is an amazing supporter of the community, and that's one of the reasons that I shop there.
    Fly Edmonton first. Support EIA

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by 24karat
    Holes is an amazing supporter of the community, and that's one of the reasons that I shop there.
    ^ Yes! Good corporate citizenship makes a huge difference to where I will shop or conduct business.

    Supporting the community in even the smallest ways means that companies are supporting their employees too as they are making a difference to “where they (all) live”.

    Hole’s Greenhouses is one of the best examples to come to my mind.

  14. #14

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    Addendum to the resource list for Zebra:

    The Zebra Child Protection Centre is the only child advocacy centre in Canada that integrates law enforcement, social service agencies, prosecutors and community volunteers to support child victims of abuse and increase arrest and conviction rates of offenders. Kevin Lowe and Karen-Percy Lowe are leading the way in the greater Edmonton community to heighten awareness through a media campaign and encourage action to support and seek justice for victims of child abuse.

    Contact Info:
    P: (780) 421-2016 or www.zebracentre.ca.

  15. #15

    Default T-shirts endorse tougher sentencing for violent crimes

    T-shirts endorse tougher sentencing for violent crimes
    Edmonton crime victim sells t-shirts to to change the justice system


    Fri, August 10, 2007
    By CARTER HAYDU, Sun Media


    An Edmonton woman who was once the victim in a brutal attack wants to change the justice system, one t-shirt at a time.
    To spread her message of dissatisfaction with Canada’s justice system, Chantelle Jacques, 57, is selling t-shirts that say, “Jail corrupt politicians for escalated crime and light sentences.”

    Jacques believes the courts are currently too easy on criminals. She hates the idea of parole and thinks those who commit serious violent crimes should be sentenced to death. “When we have capital punishment, that’s when we have justice,” she said.

    Jacques passion for harsher sentences grew out of her own experience as the victim of a vicious attack.

    While visiting an acquaintance’s downtown Edmonton home in 2001, Jacques was forced into a bedroom where two men and a woman beat her up, shaved her head, ripped off her clothes and tied her up in a closet.

    In horror, Jacques said she listened as her assailants discussed how to “dispose” of her body. Jacques believes the only reason she survived was because she managed to escape from her bindings and call a friend, who then called police.

    Soon after, police arrived on scene, finding Jacques in battered condition. “My face was just a mass of crusted blood.”

    Audrey LaFleche, described as the lead player in the assault, was sentenced to six years and four months in prison for the assault. Jacques doesn’t believe that sentence was nearly long enough for what happened. “The time should match the crime.”

    At $24 each, Jacques hopes her t-shirts raise awareness to her cause of stiffer criminal sentences. Jacques will also donate 3% of proceeds from each t-shirt sale to Amnesty International. She said the rest of the money will go back into shirt production.

    If enough people show interest in the shirts, Jacques said she might try and get buyers to sign a petition urging politicians to do away with parole.

    To arrange a shirt order, email [email protected].

    -30-

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Edmonton is too “sexy

    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Bear
    Quote Originally Posted by NoreneS

    You would think that Edmonton businesses would be interested in supporting survivors of sexual violence, even if only to make them look good as a business. Sadly, as one of those Edmontonians I can attest that support is one of the largest challenges survivors and their supporters face. Edmonton businesses need to realize that helping support survivors helps their community, employees and families. If Edmonton businesses do not begin to realize that this epidemic must stop and be instrumental in working towards a solution, they are technically becoming part of the problem.
    Can you explain how Edmonton businesses are not being supportive? Is it a lack of anti-harassment policies, looking the other way when complaints are filed . . . ? Please elaborate.
    How bout this:
    When's the last (or first ) time you ever saw a company putting on a walk, run, golf tournament, charity ball, or *anything* to support victims of sexual abuse?
    Yes, some corporate citizens do support Women's shelters, for which they should be applauded.

    BUT, in the grand scheme of things - $$$ spent, charities smiling, news coverage, etc etc etc - the amount of time, energy and publicity spent on something as valuable as SACE is a drop in the bucket compared to - oh, for example - hospitals.

    How about a Weekend to End Rape for once???


  17. #17

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    ^ YES, YES and YES.

    There are "Take back the night" walks but yeah no one raises money for the cause of sexual violence.

    Count me in as you are preaching to the choir here.

    One thing I want to spread (along with awareness) is that "Men can (must!) Stop Rape".

  18. #18

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    ^ When I was at school I devised an awareness campaign entitled "Students' Against Sexual Assault" because as I wrote this issue is EVERYONES business.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Edmonton is too “sexy

    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Bear
    Quote Originally Posted by NoreneS

    You would think that Edmonton businesses would be interested in supporting survivors of sexual violence, even if only to make them look good as a business. Sadly, as one of those Edmontonians I can attest that support is one of the largest challenges survivors and their supporters face. Edmonton businesses need to realize that helping support survivors helps their community, employees and families. If Edmonton businesses do not begin to realize that this epidemic must stop and be instrumental in working towards a solution, they are technically becoming part of the problem.
    .

    Can you explain how Edmonton businesses are not being supportive? Is it a lack of anti-harassment policies, looking the other way when complaints are filed . . . ? Please elaborate.
    I know a girl that worked for Kellog brown and root (KBR) who was sexually assaulted at work. KBR ended up paying the woman out $25,000 to say nothing, rumour is she can no longer work for the company again also.

    like ya said no inti-harassment policy nor treatment for the victum, they rather pay there way out.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Edmonton is too “sexy

    Quote Originally Posted by Dakine
    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Bear
    Quote Originally Posted by NoreneS

    You would think that Edmonton businesses would be interested in supporting survivors of sexual violence, even if only to make them look good as a business. Sadly, as one of those Edmontonians I can attest that support is one of the largest challenges survivors and their supporters face. Edmonton businesses need to realize that helping support survivors helps their community, employees and families. If Edmonton businesses do not begin to realize that this epidemic must stop and be instrumental in working towards a solution, they are technically becoming part of the problem.
    .

    Can you explain how Edmonton businesses are not being supportive? Is it a lack of anti-harassment policies, looking the other way when complaints are filed . . . ? Please elaborate.
    I know a girl that worked for Kellog brown and root (KBR) who was sexually assaulted at work. KBR ended up paying the woman out $25,000 to say nothing, rumour is she can no longer work for the company again also.

    like ya said no inti-harassment policy nor treatment for the victum, they rather pay there way out.
    ^

    Dakine,

    I wish this was the exception but I too "know" people with similiar stories...

  21. #21

    Default Soldier found guilty of sexual assault

    Soldier found guilty of sexual assault

    Karen Kleiss, edmontonjournal.com
    Published: August 15, 2007 8:46 pm


    A soldier has been convicted of sexually assaulting a young female recruit during a party after basic training three years ago.

    Master Cpl. Orman Savage, 36, sat ramrod straight and looked directly ahead as the judge issued his decision on Thursday afternoon.

    Provincial court Judge Albert Chrumka called Savage's testimony at trial "ludicrous" and "concocted."

    "You seem to be your own worst witness," Chrumka said, adding the testimony was "so fanciful it is unbelievable."

    Chrumka said he believed the testimony of the young woman, who was 21 years old when she was raped. She cannot be named due to a publication ban.

    In the early morning hours of July 31, 2004, she was celebrating with other young recruits at Debney Armoury after completing her first month of basic training.

    She had been drinking heavily and was feeling ill, and so she went to the bathroom with a friend. She said Savage approached the two women on their way to the bathroom, and offered to take care of her while the friend returned to the party. She agreed.

    When they got into the bathroom, she said he locked the door and took her to the largest stall, which was farthest from the door. There he assaulted her.

    After the attack, military supervisors told her to seek medical attention before calling police. However, the nurses on the base did not do rape kits, and she was forced to wait several hours before being assessed by a doctor.

    Outside court on Thursday, the young woman's mother criticized the military for its handling of the case.

    "It is always hush hush," the woman's mother said. "That instructor raped my daughter on a military base on military time ... and it was always hush hush."

    The mother and daughter called on the military to change the way they handle rape cases.

    As a result of the attack, the young woman has abandoned her dream of serving in the military.

    She suffers from post traumatic stress disorder and cannot be around men in combat fatigues. She has dropped out of school and attempted suicide.

    She said Thursday that she is glad the judge saw through Savage's lies.

    "It's a sense of relief," she said. "I'm just happy now that I can get on with my life."

    Savage will be sentenced Oct. 24.

    [email protected]

    © Edmonton Journal 2007

    -30-

  22. #22

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    ^ A "Rape kit" was not done by the military nurses because…

    In Edmonton as the column mentions there are SARTE personnel who are specially trained to administer a sexual assault kit (under the Canadian Criminal Code there is no Rape it is classified as sexual assault). These are highly specialized and trained staff at the five Capital Region Hospitals who can "run" a kit.

    Their forensic evidence can be accepted in Court of Queens (at the Judges discretion).

    However, it is not like on the CSI shows as usually photographs are NOT taken. Instead injuries and impressions are noted on a chart of the human body and genitalia with the nurse examiner charting detailed notes.

    Something to mention is that a “bluing” agent can be applied to pinpoint fluids, cuts and detect “bruises to be” this agent works best if applied as soon as possible after an assault. But there has been some success in detecting fluids, abrasions and bruises for up to five days after.

  23. #23

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    Medical Attention

    A physical exam after a sexual assault can be very difficult, but fortunately, in Edmonton we have services such as SARTE and the Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) Clinic Health Centre that make the process somewhat more comfortable.

    SARTE (The Sexual Assault Response Team of Edmonton) consists of a team of nurses who examine and treat all survivors who report being sexually assaulted to a hospital emergency room. The nurses have been specially trained to be sensitive to the needs of survivors. SARTE is available 24 hours a day 7 days a week, and they will examine anyone over the age of 14 (if the survivor is under the age of fourteen, the child abuse team will do the examination.)

    The SARTE nurses perform physical examinations to look for and treat injuries after a sexual assault and can collect evidence for future legal prosecution of the sexual assault if the survivor chooses to pursue this (such as a urine sample to test for the presence of date rape drugs).

    If the survivor wants physical evidence to be recorded through the use of the rape kit, the police will be phoned. Yet, this does not mean that the survivor has to report to the police. The police will be there to take the completed rape kit from the SARTE nurse to ensure continuity of the evidence and talk with the survivor if she/he is willing. To see a SARTE nurse one must go to a Capital Health hospital emergency room.

    If the survivor is concerned with the possibility of having contracted an (Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) and does not want to go to the emergency room, the STD Clinic in Edmonton provides free, confidential and anonymous testing. The Clinic is located at 11111 Jasper Avenue and they are open Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. They also take evening appointments, and these can be made by phoning 413- 5156.

  24. #24

    Default Re: Edmonton is too “sexy

    Quote Originally Posted by Dakine
    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Bear
    Quote Originally Posted by NoreneS

    You would think that Edmonton businesses would be interested in supporting survivors of sexual violence, even if only to make them look good as a business. Sadly, as one of those Edmontonians I can attest that support is one of the largest challenges survivors and their supporters face. Edmonton businesses need to realize that helping support survivors helps their community, employees and families. If Edmonton businesses do not begin to realize that this epidemic must stop and be instrumental in working towards a solution, they are technically becoming part of the problem.
    .

    Can you explain how Edmonton businesses are not being supportive? Is it a lack of anti-harassment policies, looking the other way when complaints are filed . . . ? Please elaborate.
    I know a girl that worked for Kellog brown and root (KBR) who was sexually assaulted at work. KBR ended up paying the woman out $25,000 to say nothing, rumour is she can no longer work for the company again also.

    like ya said no inti-harassment policy nor treatment for the victum, they rather pay there way out.
    ^ NO amount of money will ever give that girl total peace of mind or the same sort of trust.

    NO amount of money will ever be enough to "compensate" a survivor for their ordeal.

    Breaking the silence and challenging the myths surrounding this issue are the only hope there is for the future for survivors, their supporters and society.

  25. #25

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    Consent

    There is a common idea that accepting drinks or a dinner from someone indicates an interest in engaging in sexual activity with that person. Yet this idea is not congruent with what the person accepting the drink feels, or how the Criminal Code of Canada outlines how consent may be granted.

    Under the Criminal Code of Canada, “Consent is defined as a voluntary agreement of the complainant to engage in the sexual activity in question.”

    (Section 273.1).

    Consent is deemed not to be obtained if:

    · It is given by someone else;

    · The person is unconscious, drunk, stoned, or sleeping even if the alcohol or drugs were taken willingly, consent cannot be granted when intoxicated. In addition consenting to consuming alcohol or drugs is NOT consenting to sex;

    · It is an abuse of power, trust, or authority;

    · The person does not say yes, says no, or through other words of behavior implies no;

    · The person changes his or her mind.

  26. #26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by djgirl
    Consent

    There is a common idea that accepting drinks or a dinner from someone indicates an interest in engaging in sexual activity with that person. Yet ...
    wasn't that more of a common idea in 1978 episodes of "Three's Company"?

    ??

    flippancy aside, is that really a common view? i don't think so. really?
    City Centre Airport is to the sky as False Creek is to the ocean.

  27. #27

    Default

    ^ Unfortunately, yes this view is still commonly held... 80% of assaults will occur before the age of 18 so among those who are just defining relationships and sexual expectations.

    Myth: If the victim has consumed alcohol or drugs then it is not a sexual assault.

    Fact: Whether the victim consumed alcohol or drugs prior to the offence is irrelevant. The assault is the responsibility of the offender - who chose to commit a crime. The Criminal Code of Canada, in defining consent, has allowed that someone too incapacitated by drugs or alcohol will be deemed not to have consented. This is a recognition that some offenders will prey on people in this vulnerable state.

  28. #28
    I'd rather C2E than work!
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by djgirl
    · The person is unconscious, drunk, stoned, or sleeping even if the alcohol or drugs were taken willingly, consent cannot be granted when intoxicated. In addition consenting to consuming alcohol or drugs is NOT consenting to sex;
    That's a rather sweeping statement. Strictly applied, saying that "consent cannot be granted when intoxicated" makes anyone who has had sex with their partner after going out for a few drinks guilty of sexual assault. Exactly how intoxicated does one have to be to be too intoxicated to give consent? Logically, I would suggest that a person becomes too intoxicated to give consent at the point when they become too intoxicated to say or imply that they do not consent. Would the courts agree?

  29. #29

    Default

    A couple of drinks does not equal intoxicated or drunk for the average person. Unable to form coherent thoughts or perform basic motor skills equals too drunk. Most people can or should be able to tell the difference.

  30. #30
    First One is Always Free
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    Default

    I have to agree with djgirl in that drinks and dinner probably constitute consent in the mind of some--read not all----hormonal young adults. Hopefully this train of thought is slowly being erased but it is a long process and one that continually needs reinforcing among our children. The learning starts at home with how to properly treat each other, responsible drinking and drug use, care in leaving your drink in a bar or even who you drink with, and respect for each other. Unfortunately there are some in our society who do not have respect for others but are still allowed to raise kids. Until proper sentences are handed down and more of these animals are assigned dangerous offender status and sent to a prison built somewhere near the arctic circle we will always have these problems and we need to look out for each other, not be scared to get involved if you see a rape or sexual assualt happening, even if it is to yell out so they know they are found out or call police DO SOMETHING. Get good descriptions for later, if you think you can intervene do so but remember--- a dead hero is not a good witness.

  31. #31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kilocar
    I have to agree with djgirl in that drinks and dinner probably constitute consent in the mind of some--read not all----hormonal young adults. Hopefully this train of thought is slowly being erased but it is a long process and one that continually needs reinforcing among our children. The learning starts at home with how to properly treat each other, responsible drinking and drug use, care in leaving your drink in a bar or even who you drink with, and respect for each other. Unfortunately there are some in our society who do not have respect for others but are still allowed to raise kids. Until proper sentences are handed down and more of these animals are assigned dangerous offender status and sent to a prison built somewhere near the arctic circle we will always have these problems and we need to look out for each other, not be scared to get involved if you see a rape or sexual assualt happening, even if it is to yell out so they know they are found out or call police DO SOMETHING. Get good descriptions for later, if you think you can intervene do so but remember--- a dead hero is not a good witness.
    ^ YES!

    Something to keep in mind is that of all incidents of sexual assault, 24% took place in the victim's home, 20% in the perpetrator's home, 10% in someone else's home, 25% in a car, and 21% in a public place.

    21% of sexual assaults are in a public place!?!?!? Yet, no one "saw or heard" anything? Perhaps they did not want to get involved or what I would like to believe is that they were unaware of what was truly going on.

    I am reminded of a very good autobiography entitled "Lucky" by Alice Sebold (who also wrote "Lovely Bones") in which she describes being raped just off a campus tunnel/walkway and how people walking by yelled at her assailant "to nail her good".

    I know if I came upon someone engaging in public sexual activity no matter the circumstance I would at the very least tell the parties to take it somewhere private and if I sensed it was non-consensual I would ensure the situation stopped by calling 911 immediately and telling the perpetrator I was doing so.

  32. #32

    Default Edmonton severs too sexy: advocate

    Edmonton severs too sexy: advocate

    Thu, August 23, 2007
    By CARTER HAYDU, Sun Media


    A local women’s rights advocate says Edmonton restaurants should stick to serving food and worry less about selling sex.

    Carla Kozak, immediate past president of the National Council of Women of Canada, said provocative-waitress dress codes exist at several local restaurants and, if those establishments need sex appeal to attract patrons, that doesn’t speak highly of the food.

    Earl’s Restaurant uses attractive servers to help attract customers, but not necessarily through their skin, said Greg Repchinsky, assistant general manager for the southside restaurant on Calgary Trail. He said Earl’s servers use their “faces and personalities” to appeal to patrons.

    Earl’s lounge waitresses used to wear “sexier” cocktail dresses of their choice. However, Repchinsky said it got to the point customers couldn’t tell the difference between servers and other patrons. The restaurant chain changed its dress code, instead going for a more conservative and clean-cut look. “We just want to make it look formal.”

    He said the covered-up look doesn’t eliminate sex appeal, but simply “leaves more to the imagination.” Waiters are expected to wear pants and a dress shirt.

    Kozak said a lot of female patrons are uncomfortable around provocative-looking waitresses and restaurateurs shouldn’t isolate that portion of their clientele.

    “If I were a restaurant owner, I would not institute a ‘sexy’ dress code.”

    At the Joey’s Tomatoes on Jasper Avenue, restaurant leader Jessica Sibuliak said the restaurant prefers a neat and professional image to a sexy one, adding servers are there to serve food. “They’re not there to be eye candy.”

    -30-

  33. #33

    Default

    ^ Give me a break...this is going too far for “feminism”.

    I eat at Hooters (usually with my Dad!) and yeah the waitress don’t strategically bend over to show their cleavage in my direction like they certainly do to whatever male I am with but that they do it doesn’t offend me. If it did offend me, guess what— I have a choice! I can eat at McDonalds or some other “safe and generic” read non-sexy food establishment or I can go to Hooters, which has great burgers…hum tough choice.

    It is “so-called” experts and over the top feminists like this “advocate” that dilute, the issue of sexual violence, gender rights and responsibilities as far as I am concerned.

  34. #34

    Default Re: Edmonton is too “sexy

    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Bear
    Quote Originally Posted by NoreneS

    You would think that Edmonton businesses would be interested in supporting survivors of sexual violence, even if only to make them look good as a business. Sadly, as one of those Edmontonians I can attest that support is one of the largest challenges survivors and their supporters face. Edmonton businesses need to realize that helping support survivors helps their community, employees and families. If Edmonton businesses do not begin to realize that this epidemic must stop and be instrumental in working towards a solution, they are technically becoming part of the problem.
    Can you explain how Edmonton businesses are not being supportive? Is it a lack of anti-harassment policies, looking the other way when complaints are filed . . . ? Please elaborate.
    Times are changing
    Edmonton police adjusting the way the force handles complaints from female officers


    Fri, August 24, 2007
    By GLENN KAUTH, SUN MEDIA


    In the wake of sexual-harassment allegations by an Edmonton cop against her supervisor this week, a police union official is calling for changes to the way the local force handles complaints by female officers.

    “They tend to bear the brunt of coming forward,” Edmonton Police Association vice-president Tony Simioni said, referring to officers who have made allegations in the past.

    In particular, he’s concerned about incidents where it’s the accuser who gets moved to another department instead of the accused.

    “You don’t move the whistleblowers in these cases because that would be considered a form of punishment,” said Simioni.

    The concern comes as Const. Angie Berube detailed allegations of sexual harassment in a $4-million lawsuit she and her husband Sebastien brought against police Chief Mike Boyd and eight other officers last week.

    In a statement of claim filed with the court, Angie said she was being harassed by a senior officer who told her that her career depended on her continuing an affair with him.

    While the claims in the Berube lawsuit haven’t been proven in court, Simioni criticized the police force’s handling of Angie’s sexual-harassment complaints.

    After she became stressed and took leave as a result of the situation, management refused to pay her sick time, he said.

    He added that harassment is a growing issue in the police force as the number of female officers grows. Currently, about 300 of the 1,400 Edmonton cops are women, he said.

    While police officials couldn’t comment on specific cases, Pat Connolly, an employee-relations manager with the force, said the number of harassment cases brought to management is small.

    He’s aware of two incidents this year, up from none in 2006. In general, though, he said the caseload is “neither increasing nor decreasing.”

    Connolly added there’s no policy dictating that it’s always the accused officer who has to switch departments.

    Complaints can often “be handled very informally,” he said, adding the decision on whether to move someone depends on the particular circumstances, including the severity of the case.

    Janine Benedet, a law professor at the University of British Columbia whose expertise includes sexual-harassment issues, agreed there is no strict rule that the accused harasser must always move departments, especially when the two parties conclude they can still work together.

    She added, however, that “if the parties can’t work together, it should be the person who has committed the harassment that should be moved somewhere else.”

    Simioni, though, thinks police management doesn’t understand the issue fully.

    In some cases, he said, management will drop a harassment case simply because they don’t feel there’s enough evidence to prosecute the complaint at a full disciplinary hearing.

    “I think that the mistake that we make within the (Edmonton Police Service) is that we try to apply a burden of prosecutability rather than dealing with the issue,” he said.

    Boyd, meanwhile, said that although he feels the local force takes sexual-harassment cases seriously, he’s going to review police policy to ensure there are no gaps.


    “I think it’s always helpful to revisit our policies to find out where we can improve on them,” he said.

    [email protected]

    -30-

  35. #35

    Default Uphill battle for male sex victims

    Uphill battle for male sex victims

    By KENNETH JACKSON, SUN MEDIA
    The Ottawa Sun, August 24, 2007


    As Ottawa police continue to search for a suspect in a downtown sexual assault of a man, the investigator on the case says it's nearly unheard of for a male victim to tell anyone about the assault, let alone report it to police.

    And what's worse is that when men do report the crime, there's little help available to them in Ottawa.

    "I find it rare. I'm not saying it doesn't happen, but it's just rare that I'd be assigned a case like this," said Det. Nicole St. John of the sexual assault unit.

    St. John juggles anywhere from five to 25 sexual assault cases at a time and almost all of them involve women and children.

    At about 2:30 a.m. on Aug. 13, police allege an adult male was walking near Bank St. and Gladstone Ave. when he was approached by a black man.

    They spoke for a bit and, at one point, the suspect forced the victim to an isolated area and sexually assaulted him.

    "There are different places, dark alleys where it could have happened," she said, not willing to give the Sun the exact location of the alleged assault.

    St. John said it was a random attack and the two men didn't know each other.

    PLACES TO GO

    For female sex assault victims, there are a number of places to go for help in Ottawa, but for a man it can be difficult to find such services.

    Rick Goodwin, executive director The Men's Project in Ottawa, said they refer men to the Ottawa Hospital, where there is an eight-session counselling treatment program.

    "It's eight sessions, free of charge, which is good or good enough. We'll help them after if they need it," said Goodwin. "But we rarely get calls from men that have been recently sexually assaulted."

    Men don't like to tell anyone they've been victimized and, Goodwin said, they tend to bottle it up and try to deal with it on their own.

    "Men are slower to engage in services until it becomes truly a crisis to them," he said. "Normally, (the assault) happened a year ago or five years ago and has been on the back burner since then."

    Typically, men turn to drugs and alcohol, but when that ultimately fails they seek help elsewhere.

    "The trauma becomes full-blown and they can't handle it on their own," said Goodwin.

    NO DESCRIPTION

    The victim in this month's sexual assault doesn't want his age or description released to media, St. John said.

    "He just wanted people to know it had happened," she said.

    Police have canvassed the area and St. Jean said she needs to speak to the victim again.

    "The investigation is ongoing. There's still a lot to do," she said.

    The suspect is described as black, just under six-feet-tall, has a medium build with a pronounced stomach, shaved head, possible facial hair and is English-speaking, possibly with an accent. He was wearing a T-shirt, khaki shorts and sandals at the time of the assault.

    -30-

    To make the Edmonton connection the Sexual Assault Centre of Edmonton (SACE) provides services to any SURVIVOR (not victim) of sexual violence and has group sessions that are specific to male survivors.

    While the majority of the calls I receive on SACE's crisis line are female I DO receive a significant amount of calls from males (including many regular callers).

    Male survivors are however, even more reluctant than their female counterparts to report to police, speak of their ordeal and seek help until as the article mentions their trauma recovery is almost insurmountable.

    Also, male survivors are more likely to:

    1) Not be believed;

    2) Have questions leveled to them regarding their sexuality;

    3) Depending on the type of sexual violence inflicted on them they are:
    a. May display no trauma making it even harder to substantiate their complaints or that the act(s) were not consensual.
    or
    b. Will be hurt significantly as sexual assault is always about violence, control and degradation.

    I applaud and admire the male survivor (as I do with any survivor) in this article for his courage in speaking up and reporting his assault as it is only when survivors report is there any chance of catching offenders and holding them fully accountable for their actions.

  36. #36

    Default Some increase in funding...

    Social service groups desperate for money
    Can't keep workers in overheated economy, agencies say


    Archie McLean, edmontonjournal.com
    Published:*August 2007 4:36 pm


    Alberta's social services agencies say they are facing a worsening crisis because of their inability to find and retain staff in an overheated economy.

    "The situation is acute and desperate," said Bob Greig, the president of the Alberta Association of Disability Services. "It will only be a matter of time before a serious incident occurs."

    Greig, along with representatives from other social service umbrella groups, launched a campaign today to raise government and public awareness of their plight. They say they need an immediate infusion of cash from the province to help give their staff decent wages and benefits.

    Jody Korchinski, a spokeswoman for the Ministry of Children's Services, said the government is listening to the group's concerns. She pointed to a recent 3.5-per-cent increase in funding for women's shelters and sexual assault centres, which brings their total budget to $22 million.

    The province has also given money to child-care groups to help top up low wages.

    The money is nice, the groups say, but it's not nearly enough. Over the past few years, their capacity has been stretched to the limit and the demand for their services has been booming. Jan Reimer, the provincial co-ordinator for the Alberta Council of Women's Shelters, said her budget could easily be doubled.

    "It's time for the province to resolve decades of offloading, which has created untenable salaries, insufficient capacities and improvised salaries."

    [email protected]

    -30-

  37. #37

    Default

    Some more funding money (any money) is wonderful but there are still too many people in crisis and needing services such as SACE or Zebra with impossibly long waiting lists.

  38. #38

    Default Program aims to prevent child sex abuse

    Program aims to prevent child sex abuse

    Paul Marck, edmontonjournal.com
    Published: October 13, 2007 7:40 pm


    An outreach program by the Canadian Red Cross in Edmonton to train educators and parents to spot and prevent child sexual abuse has reached more than 100 teachers and 50 schools since its inception six months ago.

    The CARE program - Challenge Abuse through Respect Education - is a free training program that incorporates a visual learning kit with promotion of health relationships aimed at children from Kindergarten to Grade 3. While the kit itself has been available for more than 25 years, it has been revised and updated for the times, says Kristy Harcourt, CARE program co-ordinator for the Red Cross in Edmonton.

    "Now it's a lot more inclusive, to reflect kids with disabilities, ethnic and family diversity," said Harcourt. The program centres on how to deal with disclosure of sex abuse, and potential stigma and backlash from parents, school administrators and officials.

    People often find the reality of child sexual abuse uncomfortable to discuss and parents are sometimes at a loss because they have not taken the initiative themselves to educate young children about the subject, Harcourt says. "The idea of saying to people, 'What would you do if a child told you they were being abused,' is a pretty scary subject. Although the law requires teachers and any adult to report if a child discloses abuse."

    People are also fearful of making a false report. The focus of the program is on training, so people can feel better equipped to deal with victims and report the abuse to authorities.

    A $20,000 grant from Alberta Family and Community Support Services that has backstopped the program since March is due to run out in November. But Harcourt says there are still plenty of kits and training sessions available over the next six weeks.

    Teachers, principals and parents can contact Harcourt at 702-4156. It is expected that other sources of funding will be found to continue the CARE program.
    © Edmonton Journal 2007

    -30-

    Article link: < http://www.canada.com/edmontonjourna...61c944&k=15775
    >.

  39. #39

    Default Re: Debraw's comment on soldier found guilty

    referring to this post http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/forum...6&postcount=21

    Quote Originally Posted by CBC

    A former Edmonton reservist found not guilty of sexual assault should receive compensation from the Canadian Armed Forces after an investigation by military police was found to have flaws during his trial, according to a military expert.
    "Clearly, something went desperately wrong here," said Bob Bergen, an adjunct professor with the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary.
    "I've seen less egregious cases than this go to compensation and I think something has to be done to redress this."
    In October, a jury found Orman Savage, 40, not guilty of sexually assaulting a female recruit. Savage was accused of sexually assaulting the woman, then 21, in a large bathroom stall at a military party in Edmonton end of July 2004. Her identity is protected by a court-ordered publication ban.
    It was Savage's second trial on the sexual assault charge. He was originally found guilty by a provincial court judge in 2007 and sentenced to three years in prison. But the Alberta Court of Appeal ordered a new trial last April.
    During both trials, the court heard the complainant got drunk the night in question and was throwing up in the bathroom. Savage came to help her.
    http://www.cbc.ca/canada/edmonton/st...e.html?ref=rss

    mumofboys, this post was edited as per the note sent to you by another moderator.
    Last edited by Admin; 29-12-2009 at 05:56 PM. Reason: Edited to confrom with citation/posting rules on C2E

  40. #40

    Default The victim

    Quote Originally Posted by DebraW View Post
    ^ A "Rape kit" was not done by the military nurses because…

    In Edmonton as the column mentions there are SARTE personnel who are specially trained to administer a sexual assault kit (under the Canadian Criminal Code there is no Rape it is classified as sexual assault). These are highly specialized and trained staff at the five Capital Region Hospitals who can "run" a kit.

    Their forensic evidence can be accepted in Court of Queens (at the Judges discretion).

    However, it is not like on the CSI shows as usually photographs are NOT taken. Instead injuries and impressions are noted on a chart of the human body and genitalia with the nurse examiner charting detailed notes.

    Something to mention is that a “bluing” agent can be applied to pinpoint fluids, cuts and detect “bruises to be” this agent works best if applied as soon as possible after an assault. But there has been some success in detecting fluids, abrasions and bruises for up to five days after.
    I am the victim in this case. The reason that the military does not do rape kits is because it is a federal crime. They do not deal with that. Also the police are supposed to bring in the rape kit for the nurse or doctor due to the chain of evidence. Also photographs were taken and shown. There was also a SART nurse that indicated that the types of wounds I received down there are indicative of rape and that even "rough sex" does not produce those kinds of tears and rips. And I was not overly drunk, I was aware and I was sick due to the fact we had been in the gas hut that day and my mask had malfunctioned. I was sick all day but I was encouraged to drink as it was un-comrade like not to.

    My case was horribly botched. The military police that worked my case had many infractions including not contacting the RCMP to do an investigation. On top of that the crime scene was cleaned up by the people running the course, so even if there the officer HAD tried to gather evidence it was already cleaned up. Also he was only granted an appeal because the judge did not explain why he believe me over him at the end of the trial. And during the second trial they don't go over the evidence or call all the witnesses again, the jury was basically given a summation of the evidence and the last trial. They didn't bring in a large number of the original people who testified. I was very, very unhappy and displeased with the crown prosecutor but it's not technically my case and I couldn't tell them what to do.

    I was denied access to medical attention even though I had suffered a major concussion, I was denied access to the police unless I told them the details of the crime including who had committed it, I was physically assaulted by the duty NCO (who was extremely drunk on duty, also the one who denied me an ambulance even though I was having difficulty breathing and was turning blue), my mother was physically assaulted by the same women the next day (threw her through a set of double doors in a rage), and the list goes on. I have had a huge number of travesties committed against me not only by Savage and the other members on that course but by the entire military system. I was not given assistance and was left to look outside of the CF for help. I have been denied disability compensation by the military as they say that I worked and was obviously not disabled enough (I have PTSD and Major Depressive Disorder as a result of this). This case took from 2004 -2009 to finish. I was not released until June 2010. Apparently I was not supposed to work at all during that time and somehow survive off the very small disability pension I receive from Veteran's Affairs (I only found out about that program through my civil psychologist.

    There were a couple of great people who have tried to help me with this battle with the military but they have been stone-walled and if they push any further they will jeopardize their CF careers. Victims of rape in the military are not helped by the military, they are left to fend for themselves. It's still the old boys club and it's disgusting
    Last edited by rheana; 14-04-2011 at 01:36 PM.

  41. #41
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rheana View Post
    I am the victim in this case. It's still the old boys club and it's disgusting
    On behalf of good, decent men everywhere - Sincerest Apologies because of what that warped, sick individual did to your person. Take Care Rheana.
    If the risk is little, the reward is little.

  42. #42
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    Default

    This is an old thread.

    Rape is bad. Period. If you are the person in question, I do not envy your ordeal.

    One point though is that post #39 and the link to the CBC story says that the accused was acquitted.
    happy to be the grumpy old bugger waking up the booster club!

  43. #43
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    I am going to close this thread. A lot was said here and now with the most recent post I think this story is complete.

    Feel free to PM the most recent poster with any messages.

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