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Thread: Advice please, on painting old very weathered Adirondack chairs

  1. #1

    Default Advice please, on painting old very weathered Adirondack chairs

    Ok, I'm painting up 3 adirondack chairs, one new pine chair and two old, old, very weathered cedar adirondack chairs. I want to paint them up so they look like the ones in the picture(s) below (at Jasper Park Lodge). Then I'm going to stick them out at the lake and pretty much forget about them.

    I got them cheap at Habitat of Humanity but have already invested too much time fixing and gluing them up. So much for my quick and dirty fun project. So now I'm on a mission to do it to the max so I'm not doing it again for a long long time. I have some recommended oil based primer and paint and got basic advice from the store (sand and paint).

    However, the cedar is full of fine cracks and 'fractures', so now I'm wondering if I shouldn't thin some primer and put it on so it soaks deep into the cracks of the wood and fills/glues/seals them to a depth. Or possibly paint thinner directly on the wood first, and then immediately put on primer while the thinners is still wet. Basically, how do I maximize the penetration and filling effect of the primer so moisture doesn't build up under the paint and wreck it?

    Either way, I figure I'll have to prime it a second time, undiluted, as you would normally prime wood.

    I'll let the kids have some fun doing the top coating. Very bright pink, yellow and green



    http://www.followpanda.com/wp-conten...920_01o700.jpg


    https://cindyknoke.files.wordpress.c...9/dsc04504.jpg

  2. #2
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    although written more for a building exterior, everything here is applicable to your chairs (including the caulking of joints)...

    http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/ski...d-for-painting

    i wouldn't try and outguess the primer manufacturer by thinning it or applying it over wet thinner. two coats is a good idea but i would just follow their directions to a "t" after your prep is done.
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  3. #3

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    theres an ontario company called crp that make indestructible adirrondacks out of plastic. They last forever and come with a phenomenal warranty. They are worth looking at if you want a quality low maintenance option.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by gwill211 View Post
    theres an ontario company called crp that make indestructible adirrondacks out of plastic. They last forever and come with a phenomenal warranty. They are worth looking at if you want a quality low maintenance option.
    Yes I've seen some great one. Wild Bird General Store had some really nice ones I'd love to get.

    Unfortunately in my case, cost matters. I'd like to put these up on a hill for us and neighbours to use on walks, but you know how the old saying goes: "No good deed...". i.e. Creeps may bust them up, burn them up, pitch them in the creek...

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    although written more for a building exterior, everything here is applicable to your chairs (including the caulking of joints)...

    http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/ski...d-for-painting

    i wouldn't try and outguess the primer manufacturer by thinning it or applying it over wet thinner. two coats is a good idea but i would just follow their directions to a "t" after your prep is done.
    Thanks. Good information. I won't be washing these because I want the wood to be very dry for the oil based paint. Hope that makes sense.

  6. #6

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    although written more for a building exterior, everything here is applicable to your chairs (including the caulking of joints)...

    http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/ski...d-for-painting

    i wouldn't try and outguess the primer manufacturer by thinning it or applying it over wet thinner. two coats is a good idea but i would just follow their directions to a "t" after your prep is done.
    Thanks. Good information. I won't be washing these because I want the wood to be very dry for the oil based paint. Hope that makes sense.
    washing them won't even come close to their soaking in enough moisture to jeopardize the performance of the paint but painting over a dirty surface or one with chalk or residue from old paint or from sun exposure or weathering will guarantee paint failure.
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    although written more for a building exterior, everything here is applicable to your chairs (including the caulking of joints)...

    http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/ski...d-for-painting

    i wouldn't try and outguess the primer manufacturer by thinning it or applying it over wet thinner. two coats is a good idea but i would just follow their directions to a "t" after your prep is done.
    Thanks. Good information. I won't be washing these because I want the wood to be very dry for the oil based paint. Hope that makes sense.
    washing them won't even come close to their soaking in enough moisture to jeopardize the performance of the paint but painting over a dirty surface or one with chalk or residue from old paint or from sun exposure or weathering will guarantee paint failure.
    Thanks for the comment. Right you are about the dirt. Luckily no dirt or grime on these and I've wire brushed them and will do more bushing, sanding and then cleaning off any dust/powder. Since I'm using an oil based primer I really don't want any moisture in the wood that could repell any oil.

    (I've had bad experiences painting the cedar siding (#1 cedar back in the day) on our cabin. The last time. Sanded the wood, primed with "Fresh Start" and then painted. Still got spots lifting the paint off.)
    Last edited by KC; 06-05-2017 at 06:12 PM.

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