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Thread: Trump - misc

  1. #3701

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    "The Wall Street Journal stands by it's transcript." Ha ha

    In other words, the WSJ is telling us, "You should believe what WE tell you he said. Don't believe what you hear him say with your own ears!"

  2. #3702

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    I hear “and I’d probably...” so I think the WSJ screwed up or got caught.

    I could be mistaken but it should be easy to confirm the words.


    Does it matter? Trump and other politicians, their followers and the media have made inaccuracy, etc. a totally acceptable method of communication. Everyone just say what they want, the way the want. It’s all ok.
    Last edited by KC; 14-01-2018 at 08:28 PM.

  3. #3703

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by H.L. View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MrOilers View Post
    I lived in Hawaii for about half a year back in the 1990s, and I can tell you that it is absolutely frightening when the sirens go off (it was a Tsunami warning at that time). You don't really understand how alone, isolated, and trapped you are on those Islands until it sinks in that you cannot just hop into your car and leave to someplace safer.

    I hated living in Victoria for the reason, I felt very isolated..and you're right, I cant imagine the sirens going off like that..
    We had sirens here too.
    ...



    ‘This is a real emergency’: Chilling artifacts from when Canada prepared for nuclear annihilation | National Post

    “Never before broadcast or published, this is the Canadian Emergency Broadcast that was set to play on Edmonton airwaves in the event of nuclear war. The audio, stored on reel-to-reel tapes, was found in a decommissioned Edmonton municipal bunker by the Canadian Civil Defence Museum Association, who then digitized the audio.

    The second this tape hit the airwaves, the result would have been “chaos,” says Fred Armbruster, executive director of the Canadian Civil Defence Museum Association. Edmonton — as a military and oil center — was more prepared than most for nuclear war. But there still would have been thousands of people whose first real grappling with the consequences of atomic war was when they heard this recording — and suddenly had mere minutes to figure out what to do. “


    http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/...r-annihilation

    'Most likely to be bombed': unearthing Edmonton's Cold War secrets - Edmonton - CBC News

    "We are not prepared, by any means, for an emergency in general," he said. "I think Fort McMurray [during last May's wildfire] was the perfect example of that.

    "People were running out gas, people were running out of food. They didn't have any provisions in place for an evacuation-type emergency. In the Cold War era, everyone was educated."

    Disasters, whether natural or man made, could still strike our province, said Armbruster.

    "Now we aren't educating people on how to be prepared for any emergency. I always say, the Cold War never ended because the fear of the possibility of something happening is always there."

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...rets-1.3939084


    Last edited by KC; 14-01-2018 at 08:45 PM.

  4. #3704

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    ^^ Fuq anyone without comprehension of the consequences ... (Yeah, I'm looking at you, "dawg" and "Lady.")

    No. It is NOT okay.

    An in-duh-vidual with absurd and dramatic influence over hundreds of millions of people has absolutely no ability to comprehend, let alone care of, the consequences his statements and/or directives have as a result.

    The damage done is entirely selfish and malicious and without guilt. The result is a tragedy of enormous proportions.

    And it is - without question - NOT okay.

    Want to question that? I'm listening ... with my finger ... right here ...

  5. #3705
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    ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^

    i’m happy to believe my own ears...

    i clearly hear “i probably”, not “i’d probably”.

    furthermore, in his next sentence he says “i have” which only makes sense with the wsj’s transcript and what i hear directly.

    your support for the opposite being the only interpretation that makes sense defies logic, simple listening and basic parsing skills.
    Last edited by kcantor; 14-01-2018 at 10:32 PM.
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  6. #3706
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    Looks like Dicky Durbin is a liar..
    https://www.dailywire.com/news/25817...-ryan-saavedra

  7. #3707

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    Will the Donald release the tapes like he did when he said the WSJ misquoted him(which the tapes proved they didn't)?

    Dick Durbin throws down gauntlet and demands Trump release tapes of Africa slur: ‘I know what happened’

    While speaking to reporters, Durbin called on the White House to release the tapes of a White House meeting in which Trump reportedly referred to African nations as “shitholes”.


    Durbin also pushed back against some Republicans who claim that Trump used the term “shithouse” instead of “********.”


    “I know what happened,” Durbin said, noting that he attended the Oval Office meeting on immigration reform. “I stand behind every word that I said.”

    http://www.rawstory.com/2018/01/dick...what-happened/

  8. #3708

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    Trump is a blowhard who lies. He will never release the tapes.
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  9. #3709

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    He did used to keep a copy of the speeches of Hitler on his bedside table.

    Fascism starts with words — and Trump has a startling romance with the rhetoric of dictators

    "Trump also revels in an unchecked mode of self-congratulation bolstered by a limited vocabulary filled with words like “historic,” “best,” “the greatest,” “tremendous” and “beautiful.”


    Those exaggerations suggest more than hyperbole or the self-indulgent use of language. When he claims he “knows more about ISIS than the generals,” “knows more about renewables than any human being on Earth” or that nobody knows the U.S. system of government better than he does, he’s using the rhetoric of fascism.


    As the aforementioned historian Richard J. Evans writes in The Third Reich in Power:


    “The German language became a language of superlatives, so that everything the regime did became the best and the greatest, its achievements unprecedented, unique, historic and incomparable …. The language used about Hitler … was shot through and through with religious metaphors; people ‘believed in him,’ he was the redeemer, the savior, the instrument of Providence, his spirit lived in and through the German nation…. Nazi institutions domesticated themselves [through the use of a language] that became an unthinking part of everyday life.”


    Sound familiar?"

    https://www.rawstory.com/2018/01/fas...-of-dictators/

  10. #3710

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    More, plus someone believes in past lives...


    Donald Trump believes he was born to be king – LA Times
    “Some who try to understand why Trump would do such things might wonder if he's a deeply wounded, insecure soul compensating with narcissistic bluster. This diagnosis doesn't fit the Trump who answered my questions for many hours, nor does it match the conclusion reached by his second wife, Marla Maples. “He's a king,” said Maples when I interviewed her. “I mean truly. He is. He's a king. He really is a ruler of the world, as he sees it.”

    Maples suspects that Trump was a royal figure in some past life. More likely he acquired his reverse noblesse oblige by training from his father who, according to Trump biographer Harry Hurt III, raised young Donald to become “a killer” and told him “you are king.” His mother was so enchanted by royalty that Trump keenly remembers the hours she spent watching the TV broadcast of Queen Elizabeth's coronation. ...”


    http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed...203-story.html



  11. #3711

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    Sen. Graham backs up Sen Durbin.
    Graham: ‘My memory hasn’t evolved’ on Trump ‘********’ meeting

    Graham had issued a statement Friday that appeared to back up the report that Trump used such language. "Following comments by the President, I said my piece directly to him yesterday," Graham said. "The President and all those attending the meeting know what I said and how I feel. I’ve always believed that America is an idea, not defined by its people but by its ideals."


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    Graham’s fellow South Carolina senator, Republican Tim Scott, on Friday also said Graham had told him that reports that Trump used the term “********” were “basically accurate.”

    https://goo.gl/oY1cCe
    Unconfirmed reports (therefore I won't link to them yet) explain that Republicans who deny that Trump said s******e are attempting misdirection. Apparently, what he actually called them was f******e. Hence, they can claim that s******e is inaccurate while not saying what he actually said. S******e is being used in an attempt to get the word into the public discussion as f******e would be totally off limits for print and broadcast. We'll see if anyone is able to confirm. This explains Graham's "basically accurate" statement.
    Last edited by kkozoriz; Yesterday at 10:43 PM.

  12. #3712
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    Linky no worky, but given what I would assume the correct link is, the board won't let you post it in any case.

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    Omg, can someone get the story straight already. The press jumped all over the word **** hole!

  14. #3714

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    Now people are arguing about what swear word he actually said!

    They should cut out this nonsense and get to work.

  15. #3715

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    Quote Originally Posted by kkozoriz View Post
    Sen. Graham backs up Sen Durbin.
    Graham: ‘My memory hasn’t evolved’ on Trump ‘********’ meeting

    Graham had issued a statement Friday that appeared to back up the report that Trump used such language. "Following comments by the President, I said my piece directly to him yesterday," Graham said. "The President and all those attending the meeting know what I said and how I feel. I’ve always believed that America is an idea, not defined by its people but by its ideals."


    By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time.


    Graham’s fellow South Carolina senator, Republican Tim Scott, on Friday also said Graham had told him that reports that Trump used the term “********” were “basically accurate.”

    https://www.politico.com/story/2018/...meeting-340617
    Unconfirmed reports (therefore I won't link to them yet) explain that Republicans who deny that Trump said s******e are attempting misdirection. Apparently, what he actually called them was f******e. Hence, they can claim that s******e is inaccurate while not saying what he actually said. S******e is being used in an attempt to get the word into the public discussion as f******e would be totally off limits for print and broadcast. We'll see if anyone is able to confirm. This explains Graham's "basically accurate" statement.
    This foul language censorship is hilarious. **** vs ****

    Let’s start using {beep} and {beep beep}. At least it would be cute like Bugs Bunny and the Roadrunner

  16. #3716
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrOilers View Post
    Now people are arguing about what swear word he actually said!

    They should cut out this nonsense and get to work.
    sorry MrOilers, the argument - and the issue - isn’t about what swear word he actually said. it’s about what using any swear word demonstrates in the circumstances... thinking this is about word choice would only indicate your unawareness or indifference to what it’s really about.
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  17. #3717

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spudly View Post
    Listen to what Trump said yourself, rather than Sanders' usual "everyone else is wrong" spin:

    http://www.wsj.com/video/disputed-au...CDC903E74.html
    Let’s go back to this issue. So everyone which was it?

    Place your bets.

  18. #3718

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    Link shortened to avoid C2E censor

  19. #3719

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MrOilers View Post
    Now people are arguing about what swear word he actually said!

    They should cut out this nonsense and get to work.
    sorry MrOilers, the argument - and the issue - isn’t about what swear word he actually said. it’s about what using any swear word demonstrates in the circumstances... thinking this is about word choice would only indicate your unawareness or indifference to what it’s really about.
    I’d say it’s about two things:

    One - naturally the racism issue (maybe nationalism which is racism)

    Two - the fact that those in high office, all apparently at the same meeting, can’t even agree on what was said.

    For instance, rightly or wrongly, I tend to judge art by the skill, creativity or insight required to make it. If it looks like the unskilled crap I could produce, knowing my total lack of artistic, creative skills and insight, I don’t consider it very great art. Similarly, I expect people in high positions to have skills well beyond an average dunce like myself. When it seems they are even less capable than me, it’s pretty disappointing.

  20. #3720

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    Congressional Republicans think Donald Trump’s sloth and ignorance is a feature, not a bug


    A weak, easy-to-manipulate president is what they want.

    https://www.vox.com/policy-and-polit...cy-immigration
    I am in no way entitled to your opinion...

  21. #3721

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    For someone who is supposedly so "easy to manipulate", they sure tried hard to get rid of him in the primaries and to reign him in during his presidency.

  22. #3722

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    So to recap: The president described a preference for Norwegian (i.e. white) immigrants over those from “********” countries (African nations). He gave the Congressional Black Caucus the back of the hand. (“At one point, Durbin told the president that members of that caucus — an influential House group — would be more likely to agree to a deal if certain countries were included in the proposed protections, according to people familiar with the meeting. Trump was curt and dismissive, saying he was not making immigration policy to cater to the CBC and did not particularly care about that bloc’s demands, according to people briefed on the meeting. ‘You’ve got to be joking,’ one adviser said, describing Trump’s reaction.”) He blew up a possible deal on the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals program, bragged about his actions to friends and then lied to the public about what he said. Two U.S. senators lied as well and then were double-crossed by White House aides.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs...=.73dc4c2f2ed8

    Anyone who stands by these people is as devoid of morals, principles & common human decency as the Cheeto in Chief himself.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  23. #3723

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    I also think Canada would benefit more from gaining immigrants from a highly-developed country (like Norway or Japan) than from a low-literacy and undeveloped disaster zone of a country.

    Race has nothing to do with it.

  24. #3724

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrOilers View Post
    Race has nothing to do with it.
    This holds about as much water as Trump's denials of being a racist.

    You're about 10,000 posts too late for you to try and rebrand yourself as anything other than what you've portrayed yourself to be, voluntarily, over almost a decade.

    (Which is a racist.)
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  25. #3725

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    So it's racist to prefer more literate, educated, and employable immigrants?


    Huh. It appears that the definition of "racist" changed again without the memo being circulated to inform me.

  26. #3726

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrOilers View Post
    So it's racist to prefer more literate, educated, and employable immigrants?
    It's like you don't understand why not all countries aren't as developed as others. Did you sustain head trauma & completely forget social studies or world history?


    Quote Originally Posted by MrOilers View Post
    Huh. It appears that the definition of "racist" changed again without the memo being circulated to inform me.
    No, it's the same definition as always. The only change recently is to remove the subheading on "reverse racism" that was added in by conservatives. since that's totally actually not a thing & just a fairy tale told by terrible white folks to make themselves blameless for their outcome.

    There's absolutely no way you'll ever be able to recognize your beliefs as being racist. You've decided long ago that you're a good person & since racists are bad people you can't be a racist, because you're a good person.

    But you're a racist. And a bigot. And regressive. And illiberal. And the list goes on. And on. And on.

    These are not slurs, name calling or personal attacks. They are the consequences of you portraying yourself how you do.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  27. #3727

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    See? It was actually a term of endearment, right?

    Here’s the GOP’s ridiculous explanation for why Trump calling Africa a ‘sh*t house’ is not racist

    Recently, some Republicans have tried to defend President Donald Trump’s declaration that he wants fewer immigrants from “********” countries in Africa by saying the president actually referred to those countries as “**** houses.”


    Although critics have charged that this defense is essentially a distinction without a difference, it seems that Republican operatives have come up with a more nuanced context of what it means to live in a “**** house.”


    Scott Wong, a senior staff writer at The Hill, talked with some Republicans on Tuesday to get an explanation for why calling African countries “**** houses” is less offensive than calling them “shitholes.”


    “Some Rs say ‘shithouse countries’ refers to poor countries with no plumbing,” Wong writes on Twitter. “Places where you have to walk out to the shithouse — and therefore the phrase is NOT racist.

    http://www.rawstory.com/2018/01/here...is-not-racist/

  28. #3728

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    Quote Originally Posted by noodle View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MrOilers View Post
    So it's racist to prefer more literate, educated, and employable immigrants?
    It's like you don't understand why not all countries aren't as developed as others.

    You mean like why isn't Romania as developed as Singapore?

  29. #3729

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    Just like there's nothing wrong with allowing free movement of people from within Canada to other parts of Alberta, it's reasonable that immigration from nations that are more similar to Canada be less restricted than from the rest of the world. There would be next to no downside to allowing essentially unrestricted immigration from the Anglosphere countries and France, or really any Anglophone or francophone from a fully developed nation, because they would adapt easily and have it reasonable good where they are and wouldn't be coming in large numbers.
    There can only be one.

  30. #3730

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    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander II View Post
    There would be next to no downside to allowing essentially unrestricted immigration from the Anglosphere countries and France, or really any Anglophone or francophone from a fully developed nation, because they would adapt easily and have it reasonable good where they are and wouldn't be coming in large numbers.
    That's a good point - some people are able to slide right into out culture and contribute positively (and gain benefit for themselves) right away.

    Other people are more of a "project" of sorts, needing drastically more time, education, health care, and social resources to successfully adapt to our society. It would be a tragic mistake to accept too many immigrants of this group at a time if we were unable to properly serve them (and it would be very unfair to those immigrants to be brought here with not enough support as well).

  31. #3731

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    ^its why the previous governments focus, with a lot of direction from Baird, on getting more gay's who were repressed in Muslim and other countries made a lot of sense. They tended to integrate very fast, basically, they finally have freedom from backwards societies / religions that treated them like dirt, or forced them to take on effeminate / non-threating roles.

  32. #3732

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    I'm eternally grateful that MrOilers & his ilk weren't controlling immigration policy in Canada in the 1800s, or my mother's family would never have been able to make it here, what with them being a persecuted ethnic group that was denied the right to own property or go to school in their homeland & escaped to Canada to make a better life.

    I'm the product of two different waves of people unwanted & uncared for in their home country, who were able to come to Canada & enjoy the same opportunities as every other Canadian, regardless of their individual status or merits. It's what people make of those opportunities that matter & my family made the most of Canada. There's a statue of my great great grandfather in the village he left in Hungary, because he sent enough money home to start a school everyone could go to, including the Roma kids. The homestead he was given for $10 made it through my family's hands until it ended up being given to my mother when my grandpa passed. Turns out it has potash under it & the royalties from that potash pays into a fund that ensures that every single person in my family can go to school, wherever they want, for as long as they want, limited only by their own hard work & imagination. Not bad for a bunch of gypsies who made their way into Canada pretending to be ethnic Hungarians.

    MrOilers would have left my family in the camps.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  33. #3733

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    So where do you go from replaying the "race card" over and over again?

    I guess you play the "think about my great grandmother" card instead of the pressing issues of today's world.

  34. #3734

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    Didn't mention my greatgrandmother once.

    Mentioned my greatgreatgrandfather & mother.

    Shows you how much time & effort MrO puts into his reading comprehension. No wonder why he's a diehard Trumpeteer, barely-literate birds of a feather & all that.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  35. #3735

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    Quote Originally Posted by noodle View Post
    Mentioned my greatgreatgrandfather & mother.
    And you also mentioned how they slid right into our culture and contributed positively (and gained benefits for themselves right away). Good for them. And not so different from the stories of some of my ancestors.

    My wife's ancestors have a different story (they immigrated more recently, and laugh at anyone who calls Donald Trump or lumps his followers together as "racist". They really demonstrate how folly it is for certain members of the the left to try to be heroes and speak on behalf of groups of people, despite how these people all are perfectly capable of thinking differently and forming their own opinions on immigration as well)

  36. #3736

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    Now that we don't have prime agricultural land that we can give out for $10/160 acres or an economy where immigrants can be capable of taking raw land and surviving on it while improving it, building a house and otherwise being economically productive with nothing more than the clothes on their backs, an axe, plow, hammer, knife and pot-belly stove.... immigration has to be a little different.

    Despite language barriers, Polish/Ukrainian/Russian/ Scandinavian immigrants 100+ years ago had all the skills that they needed to build a life on a farm, to the standards of the day.

    Not only are there no capital-building jobs available to illiterate (in English) immigrants today, but the living conditions that immigrants even 60 years ago faced are no longer acceptable - My grandparents lived in a one-room un-insulated shack in a bush camp with a one-year old and an infant and no running water for a couple of years, and my grandfather was fluent in English when they arrived.
    There can only be one.

  37. #3737

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrOilers View Post
    And you also mentioned how they slid right into our culture and contributed positively (and gained benefits for themselves right away).
    I mentioned nothing of the sort. It wasn't easy for them to give up their culture & heritage to assimilate, first with their ethnic Hungarian neighbours & then into Canada writ large. They never had a race card to play, as it would have cast them out of their community. Our ethnic heritage & the real story wasn't really talked about for almost a hundred years. It was anything but a "slide". It was a struggle, every day & much has been lost. I likely identify more with my Romani roots than most of the intervening generations, as I feel it provides a depth to a story that otherwise would appear to be plucked straight out of a sanitized Social Studies textbook for 3rd graders.

    The stories of my family's immigration to Canada are stories of success & stories of loss. They gained a lot by moving to Canada but it came at a cost that they shouldn't have had to pay & I'm glad we're not excising the same toll on newer immigrants while continuing to provide them with a land of opportunity like my ancestors believed Canada to be & worked hard to make it so
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  38. #3738

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    One thing about immigrants today is that they have way more means of keeping in contact with their homelands. Facebook/Whatsap/FaceTime/Skype etc. Not to mention plane travel, vehicles etc. This was not possible for earlier immigrants. When they came here they were leaving their families behind with the only means of cantact being postal. They were more likely to seek out their own nationalities just to get some closeness to what they were familiar with. A lot of them did not have the support of brothers/sisters/parents/cousins etc. Could not get on Skype if they were feeling homesick.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  39. #3739

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    TL : DR version - "We got ours, screw you"

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander II View Post
    Now that we don't have prime agricultural land that we can give out for $10/160 acres or an economy where immigrants can be capable of taking raw land and surviving on it while improving it, building a house and otherwise being economically productive with nothing more than the clothes on their backs, an axe, plow, hammer, knife and pot-belly stove.... immigration has to be a little different.

    Despite language barriers, Polish/Ukrainian/Russian/ Scandinavian immigrants 100+ years ago had all the skills that they needed to build a life on a farm, to the standards of the day.

    Not only are there no capital-building jobs available to illiterate (in English) immigrants today, but the living conditions that immigrants even 60 years ago faced are no longer acceptable - My grandparents lived in a one-room un-insulated shack in a bush camp with a one-year old and an infant and no running water for a couple of years, and my grandfather was fluent in English when they arrived.
    Yeah, immigrants back then were welcomed with open arms.



    Good thing we're so much better than back then.

    Last edited by kkozoriz; Today at 01:11 PM.

  40. #3740

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    Or, here's a cartoon version since some people here don't do so well with words.

    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  41. #3741

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    All the above makes integration slower. People still form enclaves, but now they can immerse themselves in media from their home country more often than maybe a monthly magazine. We're also settling far more of our immigrants in cities where it's easier for immigrant communities to form a critical mass. I don't think it's been a problem so far; there's probably no neighbourhood in edmonton that's close to a majority one ethnic community. But it could be.
    There can only be one.

  42. #3742

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    Or, since they can easily keep in contact with friends and family back home, they find it less necessary to form enclaves here.

  43. #3743
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    One thing about immigrants today is that they have way more means of keeping in contact with their homelands. Facebook/Whatsap/FaceTime/Skype etc. Not to mention plane travel, vehicles etc. This was not possible for earlier immigrants. When they came here they were leaving their families behind with the only means of cantact being postal. They were more likely to seek out their own nationalities just to get some closeness to what they were familiar with. A lot of them did not have the support of brothers/sisters/parents/cousins etc. Could not get on Skype if they were feeling homesick.
    one other thing about immigrants today is how many we welcome every year and how many now live hear. canada still accepts somewhere in the range of 250,000 immigrants a year (in 2016 it was closer to 300,000) and approximately 1 in 5 canadians was not born in canada.

    no, we don't ship them off to fend for themselves on $10 quarter sections any more but it's still the homes they live in (owned or rented), the furniture, food and clothing they purchase, the cars or the transit they ride and maintain, the schools they attend to learn or to teach at, the jobs they fill and the taxes they pay that gift us with a large part of our standard of living as well as the richness and diversity of our lives.

    in total, we accepted immigrants from 190 different countries in 2016 and since the beginning of this year alone i've had the pleasure of dealing with some of them from vietnam, india, pakistan, phillipines, ukraine, poland, the us, great britain, croatia, china, and japan and those are only the ones i'm aware of.
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  44. #3744

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    More of Trump's "good people"
    Nazi website Daily Stormer is ‘designed to target‘ kids


    ""My site is mainly designed to target children” for radicalization, the editor, Andrew Anglin, said Saturday on Radical Agenda, a radio show hosted by Christopher Cantwell, one of the marchers during a deadly Charlottesville, Virginia rally in August. “[Age] 11 through teenage years.… Young adults, pubescents ."


    Anglin’s remark was part of a discussion about how memes are used by neo-Nazis to “indoctrinate” children into sharing their beliefs. Cantwell later took a call from a boy claiming to be 14 years old. The boy praised Anglin, 33, and Cantwell, 37, as being influential on him, adding: “I’m sitting next to a bookshelf with Mein Kampf,” referring to the autobiography of Adolf Hitler. Cantwell seemed to grow nervous while talking to the boy, asserting that the show was meant only for entertainment, but Anglin quickly embraced the listener.


    "[White] men naturally want this,” he boasted. “Our goal has to be to give this [ideology] to teenagers and even before teenagers.”"

    https://www.rawstory.com/2018/01/naz...o-target-kids/

  45. #3745
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    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander II View Post
    All the above makes integration slower. People still form enclaves, but now they can immerse themselves in media from their home country more often than maybe a monthly magazine. We're also settling far more of our immigrants in cities where it's easier for immigrant communities to form a critical mass. I don't think it's been a problem so far; there's probably no neighbourhood in edmonton that's close to a majority one ethnic community. But it could be.
    i don't think recent immigrants integrate and faster or any slower than previous immigrants and many of those enclaves - from little italy to chinatown - provide much of the cultural diversity i previously mentioned. interestingly enough, maintaining that diversity from one generation to the next is becoming more and more difficult to maintain and often ends up being primarily for business rather than residential activities and those are often supported as much or more by other cultures and ethnicities than those maintaining them.
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  46. #3746

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    Quote Originally Posted by kkozoriz View Post
    TL : DR version - "We got ours, screw you"

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander II View Post
    Now that we don't have prime agricultural land that we can give out for $10/160 acres or an economy where immigrants can be capable of taking raw land and surviving on it while improving it, building a house and otherwise being economically productive with nothing more than the clothes on their backs, an axe, plow, hammer, knife and pot-belly stove.... immigration has to be a little different.

    Despite language barriers, Polish/Ukrainian/Russian/ Scandinavian immigrants 100+ years ago had all the skills that they needed to build a life on a farm, to the standards of the day.

    Not only are there no capital-building jobs available to illiterate (in English) immigrants today, but the living conditions that immigrants even 60 years ago faced are no longer acceptable - My grandparents lived in a one-room un-insulated shack in a bush camp with a one-year old and an infant and no running water for a couple of years, and my grandfather was fluent in English when they arrived.
    Yeah, immigrants back then were welcomed with open arms.



    Good thing we're so much better than back then.

    ...


    For Labour Day, Quotations From Saint J.S. Woodsworth (PART I) - Immigration Watch Canada

    “Generally speaking, the Scotch, Irish and Welsh have done well. The greater number of failures has been among the English. Someone has said that 'the English are the least readily assimilated of the English-speaking nationalities'. But the trouble has been with the class of immigrants who have come. ..England has sent us largely the failures of its cities. ..In any case, many of the immigrants are culls from English factories and shops. These cannot compete with other English-speaking people and often not with non-English, despite the latter's disadvantage in not knowing the language. On many western farms, certain Englishmen have proved so useless that when help is needed, 'no Englishman need apply'. (Pp.47-4



    http://immigrationwatchcanada.org/20...sworth-part-i/



    "Englishmen Need Not Apply" job notices of the early 1900s in the prairies, “

    An English Sense of Justice - General History


    http://www.whitepinepictures.com/see.../history3.html


    In a small booklet he called "The Future Government of Canada," Thompson served up some harsh words for the country that ruined his father:



    "The time must come for Canada to cease her present connection with the British Empire. Canada can exist as an independent nation, not a monarchy or aristocracy. What could be more ridiculous than to bestow class privileges because of the achievements of some remote ancestor? Remove class distinction and bestow upon all the same advantages, regardless of race, creed, colour or condition. Give all a fair start in the race of life."(

    The opposite occurred. Speculative companies such as the Canada Company acquired large tracts of land on the condition that they bring "suitable" settlers from England. Schemes were introduced by which English parishes unloaded the paupers and victims of crop failures and economic depression into Canada. They came with no means of survival and no skills necessary to endure the pioneer experience.(9)
    Wherever the English settled, however, they quickly assimilated into the local community. This is largely because they did not have to learn a new language and encountered little prejudice, with the exception of the early English immigrants who populated Quebec. Outbursts of Anglophobia have been rare enough. The occasional protest against their presence such as the "Englishmen Need Not Apply" job notices of the early 1900s in the prairies, were a curious exception to the rule.(10)

  47. #3747

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kkozoriz View Post
    TL : DR version - "We got ours, screw you"

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander II View Post
    Now that we don't have prime agricultural land that we can give out for $10/160 acres or an economy where immigrants can be capable of taking raw land and surviving on it while improving it, building a house and otherwise being economically productive with nothing more than the clothes on their backs, an axe, plow, hammer, knife and pot-belly stove.... immigration has to be a little different.

    Despite language barriers, Polish/Ukrainian/Russian/ Scandinavian immigrants 100+ years ago had all the skills that they needed to build a life on a farm, to the standards of the day.

    Not only are there no capital-building jobs available to illiterate (in English) immigrants today, but the living conditions that immigrants even 60 years ago faced are no longer acceptable - My grandparents lived in a one-room un-insulated shack in a bush camp with a one-year old and an infant and no running water for a couple of years, and my grandfather was fluent in English when they arrived.
    Yeah, immigrants back then were welcomed with open arms.



    Good thing we're so much better than back then.
    That's some top-notch misunderstanding there.

    "Ours" was cheap, no services except maybe 6 grades in a 1-room school house, no handouts except those 160 raw acres to clear by hand.
    "Theirs" is a lot more expensive. I like that we can offer better education, better infrastructure, English language training, universal healthcare and more to new arrivals but it's self-evident that we can't maintain anything like that level of services if huddled the huddled masses of today immigrate in the same proportions that the huddled masses of eastern Europe came 120 years ago.
    There can only be one.

  48. #3748

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    One thing about immigrants today is that they have way more means of keeping in contact with their homelands. Facebook/Whatsap/FaceTime/Skype etc. Not to mention plane travel, vehicles etc. This was not possible for earlier immigrants. When they came here they were leaving their families behind with the only means of cantact being postal. They were more likely to seek out their own nationalities just to get some closeness to what they were familiar with. A lot of them did not have the support of brothers/sisters/parents/cousins etc. Could not get on Skype if they were feeling homesick.
    one other thing about immigrants today is how many we welcome every year and how many now live hear. canada still accepts somewhere in the range of 250,000 immigrants a year (in 2016 it was closer to 300,000) and approximately 1 in 5 canadians was not born in canada.

    no, we don't ship them off to fend for themselves on $10 quarter sections any more but it's still the homes they live in (owned or rented), the furniture, food and clothing they purchase, the cars or the transit they ride and maintain, the schools they attend to learn or to teach at, the jobs they fill and the taxes they pay that gift us with a large part of our standard of living as well as the richness and diversity of our lives.

    in total, we accepted immigrants from 190 different countries in 2016 and since the beginning of this year alone i've had the pleasure of dealing with some of them from vietnam, india, pakistan, phillipines, ukraine, poland, the us, great britain, croatia, china, and japan and those are only the ones i'm aware of.
    No, we don't ship them off to fend for themselves on $10 quarter sections any more but I should imagine that $10 quarter section of land was way more backbreaking to clear that it is now. We also have to remember that back in the day there was no social services or monetary benefits given by the governments. No social security network etc. Apart form their $10 parcel of land they were on their own. At the mercy of the elements, in the middle of nowhere with the only transportation being a horse.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  49. #3749

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    At the mercy of the elements, in the middle of nowhere with the only transportation being a horse.
    Do you think western Canada was settled on horseback?
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  50. #3750

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander II View Post
    All the above makes integration slower. People still form enclaves, but now they can immerse themselves in media from their home country more often than maybe a monthly magazine. We're also settling far more of our immigrants in cities where it's easier for immigrant communities to form a critical mass. I don't think it's been a problem so far; there's probably no neighbourhood in edmonton that's close to a majority one ethnic community. But it could be.
    i don't think recent immigrants integrate and faster or any slower than previous immigrants and many of those enclaves - from little italy to chinatown - provide much of the cultural diversity i previously mentioned. interestingly enough, maintaining that diversity from one generation to the next is becoming more and more difficult to maintain and often ends up being primarily for business rather than residential activities and those are often supported as much or more by other cultures and ethnicities than those maintaining them.
    It's a really interesting question.

    I suspect that in general you're correct.

    One situation that will be interesting to watch is integration of communities with cultural/religious specific dress, including turbans and head scarves, whether they will fade with the generations or will persist longer as specific dress seems to in physically separated communities like Hutterites.
    There can only be one.

  51. #3751

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by noodle View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    At the mercy of the elements, in the middle of nowhere with the only transportation being a horse.
    Do you think western Canada was settled on horseback?
    Is this a trick question and am I going to be accused of some kind of 'Dystonia' if I don't answer it, or answer it wrongly?.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  52. #3752

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kkozoriz View Post
    More of Trump's "good people"
    No, Trump never called Nazis "good people". Not once. And he never will.

    This baiting really hurts your credibility.

  53. #3753

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    Let's see, who here didn't know that Norway is 95% white?

    Trump’s Secretary of Homeland Security isn’t sure if people in Norway are white
    "Being from Norway is not a skill."

    Leahy followed up by asking her, “Norway is a predominately white country, isn’t it?”


    Nielsen feigned ignorance.


    “I’m — I — eh, I actually do not know that, sir, but I imagine that’s the case,” she replied.

    https://thinkprogress.org/kirstjen-n...-1c8673b23c0b/

  54. #3754

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    They're pretty much the whitest there are. Pretty hard to image someone really doesn't know.
    There can only be one.

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