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Thread: 30 km/h Playground Speed Limits Approved, Entire Residential Areas in Crosshairs Next

  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by mseaver View Post
    ... take such human factors into account and produce designs that reduce or eliminate confrontation. ...
    For example.

    Consider the pedestrian bridge that crosses Belgravia Rd at 116th St. Built during Jan Reimer's terms in office and when traffic volumes were vastly lower than today. I recall neo-cons who hated anything Reimer was connected with taking issue with the construction of this bridge, despite the alternative being a cross-walk or a traffic light. Who on foot, bike or in a vehicle can imagine navigating that intersection today in the absence of this bridge?

    Consider the pedestrian underpass at 76th Ave & 114th St. Pedestrians and cyclists enjoy free movement across 114th in total safety. When vehicular traffic is able to move, it does so unimpeded by careless, distracted and impatient pedestrians/cyclists. Is there anything like this project elsewhere in Edmonton, besides the pedway system downtown?

    Edit: Come of think of it, the pedway system isn't a suitable comparison.
    Last edited by mseaver; 25-09-2017 at 04:03 PM.

  2. #202

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    I would love to see more grade separations for pedestrians, but they have to make sense if they're going to work. 76& 114 gets it close. The pedestrian bridges over Whitemud, and the one over Belgravia Road are the right idea, they just need to connect better.

    Others, like the monolith over 97st at 115? ave are poorly designed and compatible with the surrounding streetscapes.

    But they aren't an appropriate solution within neighbourhoods or along older main streets.
    There can only be one.

  3. #203
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    What has changed is the mindset.

    Today, I truly believe the wonks would propose a crosswalk for Belgravia & 116th and the nuts would supports them, imagining that the bubble they live in would protect them and when it didn't, insisting that cars be banned from travelling along Belgravia.

  4. #204

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    We are talking about lowering the speed on residential streets. Not major thoroughfares. Not Arteries, not collectors roads, but local community roads, and roads that pass playgrounds and school zones. The solutions mseaver talks about are for major roadways, and have little to no point to being discussed about residential road speed limits.

  5. #205

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    Quote Originally Posted by mseaver View Post
    What has changed is the mindset.

    Today, I truly believe the wonks would propose a crosswalk for Belgravia & 116th and the nuts would supports them, imagining that the bubble they live in would protect them and when it didn't, insisting that cars be banned from travelling along Belgravia.
    Kinda like how you keep putting up signs that are unsanctioned by the city, trying to ban bikes from going up a bike path to Grandview heights?

  6. #206

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    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander II View Post
    I would love to see more grade separations for pedestrians, but they have to make sense if they're going to work. 76& 114 gets it close. The pedestrian bridges over Whitemud, and the one over Belgravia Road are the right idea, they just need to connect better.

    Others, like the monolith over 97st at 115? ave are poorly designed and compatible with the surrounding streetscapes.

    But they aren't an appropriate solution within neighbourhoods or along older main streets.
    Agree the one on 115 Ave. and 97 th. Street is about as much use as a fish tank in the ocean. I don't think any walk over bridges over busy roads are particularly useful. To many stairs, to steep, to off putting. Not to mention the elderly, kids and their short legs and disabled people, well no thought whatsoever put into them bridges for disabilities.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  7. #207

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    Why must the city try and reinvent the wheel on almost everything? Nearly every US city has 30mph speed limit in residential zones. That is 48Km/h, call it 50 - done. I'm fine with the 30km/h in school zones though.

  8. #208

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    Quote Originally Posted by mseaver View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Meo View Post
    The question shouldn't be if a lower speed will save lives, cause it will. The question should be would people adhere to the new speed limit. Unless you are putting speed cameras at all those new playground/school zone, I think this move won't decrease any traffic accidents. I personally think the opposite might happen. I ride the bus and I go by 1 playground, 3 school zones. I can tell you at around 8 AM, no one is driving at 30 km/hr or slower. Not the bus driver, not the other drivers either.

    You need something to motiviate people to slow down or else all you're doing is DESENSITIZE people. It's like if you lived in an apartment where the fire alarm is wacky and goes off once every two weeks v. never having a fire alarm go off. Which is more likely to get you out of your apartment? The City wants to set off fire alarms 14 hrs 30 minutes per day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.
    God forbid that the City should take such human factors into account and produce designs that reduce or eliminate confrontation. As opposed to increasing, if not GUARANTEEING pedestrian/cyclist/vehicle confrontation will occur and then seeking to profit from it, physical/emotional carnage be damned.
    Fines double when kids are present (8-9am, 3-4pm), halve when they are not (the other times).

  9. #209

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    We are talking about lowering the speed on residential streets. Not major thoroughfares. Not Arteries, not collectors roads, but local community roads, and roads that pass playgrounds and school zones. The solutions mseaver talks about are for major roadways, and have little to no point to being discussed about residential road speed limits.
    As covered earlier in the thread some neighborhoods, through either poor, or different design, and including for instance almost all of Millwoods and Castledowns have schools and parks adjacent to main roads. For Instance Millwoods road, 66st, 50st, 23avenue etc. Nearly every school in Millwoods ARE on AT LEAST collector roads. Virtually all of them are directly on main bus routes for instance.

    For some reason, in many of these suburban areas the thinking at the time was to put schools on arterial and collector routes and I can only surmise for viability of transit, transportation to and from them.

    Compounding the issue all of these schools have drop off, collection, school busses, regular busses, taking place on the main roads. Regardless of speed limit its bumper to bumper in these areas. So that you're moving 10km/hr, not 30, not 40. Nearly all of them border side roads but those are not being utilized, even though they are arguably safer collection points. They use the bordering main roads. With helicopter parents blocking roadway with parking and sometimes double parking on both sides of the road. For the two contiguous blocks. In effect parents actually making the areas more hazardous, and less visible by parking in those areas and many illegally.
    Last edited by Replacement; 26-09-2017 at 06:09 AM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  10. #210

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    Quote Originally Posted by noodle View Post
    https://www.edmonton.ca/transportati...ty/why-30.aspx

    Injury Statistics on Traffic Injuries to Children

    In the last five years, there have been 176 injury collisions involving children aged 15 years or younger on collector and local roadways (non-arterial).

    • 37% (65) of those collisions occurred in areas that will be covered by the proposed playground zones (even though, playground zones would constitute only 7% of the entire collector and local road network)
    • 20% of those injured in those 65 collisions required hospitalization
    • 99% of the 65 injury collisions happened between 7:30am-9pm (the proposed hours of playground zones)
    How fast were the cars going in those 65 collisions? That seems to be the most important detail when attempting to justify a blanket speed reduction, yet it's not included. In my experience as a bit of an analytics junkie, when details like that are not present, it's usually intentional.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  11. #211

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    So, they have started putting these playground zones in many areas of the city and I don't know if it is just me but does anybody else notice that they seem to not make sense as to where they put them? It seems like they didn't think things through on some of these places and just plopped them down and called it a day rather than taking some time and studying where they are actually needed.

    For example, one stretch is by Wagner High School on 86 Street. Why? It is a high school. If you can't get high school kids to properly cross a road then what are we doing giving them a drivers license at that age? To add, it is a fenced in area located in an industrial zone not a residential one. To top it off, there are no kids there after school unless it is for soccer or football so why a playground zone when if need be a school zone would have been sufficient.

    I thought when they made this bylaw it would actually apply to playground areas that actually have a high number of kid traffic but nope, swing and a miss on that one. Hazeldean Park on 66 Ave. A playground. A busy one at that with cars parked on both sides of street making it hard to see kids if they dart between them. No playground zone sign. Whaaaat?

    Fenced in soccer field with no kids on a regular basis to be found on 76 street and Millbourne Road. Playground zone. Whaaaat?

    Just down the street from there at St. Hilda School. Kids regularly playing basketball late into the night on the courts there. No playground zone.

    Like who decides this stuff?

  12. #212

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Hollywood View Post
    So, they have started putting these playground zones in many areas of the city and I don't know if it is just me but does anybody else notice that they seem to not make sense as to where they put them? It seems like they didn't think things through on some of these places and just plopped them down and called it a day rather than taking some time and studying where they are actually needed.

    For example, one stretch is by Wagner High School on 86 Street. Why? It is a high school. If you can't get high school kids to properly cross a road then what are we doing giving them a drivers license at that age? To add, it is a fenced in area located in an industrial zone not a residential one. To top it off, there are no kids there after school unless it is for soccer or football so why a playground zone when if need be a school zone would have been sufficient.

    I thought when they made this bylaw it would actually apply to playground areas that actually have a high number of kid traffic but nope, swing and a miss on that one. Hazeldean Park on 66 Ave. A playground. A busy one at that with cars parked on both sides of street making it hard to see kids if they dart between them. No playground zone sign. Whaaaat?

    Fenced in soccer field with no kids on a regular basis to be found on 76 street and Millbourne Road. Playground zone. Whaaaat?

    Just down the street from there at St. Hilda School. Kids regularly playing basketball late into the night on the courts there. No playground zone.

    Like who decides this stuff?
    Its not about safety. It never was about safety. Its purposely sneaked into some areas so people can be ticketed doing 40 through photo radar.

    Just east of 76 Street, Millbourne Road has a huge stretch thats under a playground zone, where more than 50% of the stretch has houses on both sides and no playground. Saw a photo radar truck there conveniently sitting there ticketing people going 40. No playground in sight.

  13. #213

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    ya, no playground in sight... but google maps shows a park with a playground area. https://www.google.ca/maps/@53.48009.../data=!3m1!1e3

    Yes, its about safety. You don't need to be doing 50 or more on residential roads. The time it costs you is a few seconds. Big deal. It took you much longer to write that post that it would take to travel through these zones over a year.

  14. #214

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    ya, no playground in sight... but google maps shows a park with a playground area. https://www.google.ca/maps/@53.48009.../data=!3m1!1e3

    Yes, its about safety. You don't need to be doing 50 or more on residential roads. The time it costs you is a few seconds. Big deal. It took you much longer to write that post that it would take to travel through these zones over a year.
    Funny because I actually live there. The bend in the road has no playground. There are townhouses through the entire bend.

    There is no data to suggest that doing 50 in these areas is somehow gonna hurt these kids. How many fatalities are you aware of that are resulted with drivers doing 50? Why are the playgrounds they pick so ridiculous? Why is WP Wagner high school part of the playground zone. 86 street is not a residential road by wagner. Why are we slowing down to 30 for fenced playgrounds, which the playground you linked on your post has on 76 street.

    This has ABSOLUTELY nothing to do with kids safety. ABSOLUTELY nothing. No data backs up going 30 km/h for long random stretches is somehow safer. Do a study, back it up, then enforce sane laws.

    No, doing 40 in that bend or on 86 street on wagner road or 76 street is not in any way dangering a child's life. But people are getting ticketed nonetheless. My friend got a ticket for going 36 in a schoolzone. I am sure they are ticketing people in the same way for playground zones. I live in this very neighbourhood, there are only kids certain evenings in the summer. The entire park is barren in the winter.

  15. #215

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    Also, not that I care about the time loss here, because there are certain sections closer to whyte ave where going 30 makes sense, specially in developed neighborhoods where the roads are quite narrow and people park on the road.

    But, the playground zone on millbourne road stretches from 41 ave to 76 street. Thats 800 meters. Which I take twice a day (I take more than one playground zone to work, but lets just look at this one). So 1.6 km, going 50, it would take me 1 min and 55 seconds, and going 30 takes me 3 mins and 12 seconds. Take that to an entire year, its 8 hours of extra time a year. So it isn't "just a few seconds over a year". This doesnt include any time lost due to missed traffic lights, slower traffic that leads to buildup and phantom traffic jams, etc.

    And that is just on ONE STREET from ONE playground zone. I am not taking into account going 30 on 76 Street due to this playground zone even though that side of the playground is fenced. The last time I saw a bloody kid in this park was in september.

    Multiply this by other playground zones.

    Take into account the number of people it effects. Thats millions of hours lost of efficiency. For Nothing. I guess not nothing, for Medwards to go "THINK OF THE CHILDRENNNN!!!"
    Last edited by bhaskar21; 23-10-2017 at 12:54 PM.

  16. #216

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    I can't speak for any particular zone, maybe there is a fence that makes the zone less than urgent.

    But if you really cared about your extra minute a day you wouldn't have moved to where you have to drive past multiple school and playground zones.

    Really. You don't even notice an extra 35 seconds a trip, that's less than one red light, one ad on TV. if you hit snooze once every two weeks you've wasted more time than this playground zone.
    There can only be one.

  17. #217

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    Once again, as I said earlier. The time loss isn't something I am majorly inconvenienced by. I have no problems slowing down to 30 when there are kids around.

    But I talked about time because the argument that we waste "a few seconds a year" is ridiculous. I waste 8 hours due to being on one street on one playground zone. Lets assume I miss 15 hours a year due to playground zones. Its found that an average commuter in the US wastes 42 hours a year commuting. (https://www.cnbc.com/2016/08/09/comm...each-year.html).

    We are adding 15 hours on top of that to Edmontonians each year. If I hit the snooze button once every two weeks, thats time that I sleep. Its not the same as time I spend on the road. You can't equate the two. One is good for me, the other is needlessly thrown on me because people can't stop yelling out "Think of the children" as loud as possible.

    Now this is an exaggeration but what if I said "hey Highlander, let me torture you 15 hours a year. Its the same as you pressing snooze on your alarm once a week, so its not a big deal".

    Commuting leads to general unhappiness (https://www.economist.com/blogs/gull...rils-commuting) so we are exposing commuters to our city to higher probabilities of depression and stress.

    Do a study, find what playgrounds and/or roads require lower speeds. Find out what that low speed should be and then find when are those lower speeds required and then enforce it.

    Claiming that this is for the safety of children is ridiculous. Neither you or Medwards are going to talk about examples that have been pointed out for playground zones been placed randomly for nothing but to catch commuters doing 35 and ticketing them.

    If the goal is to prevent any kid from getting any scratches then stop using vehicles altogether and start subsidizing self driving cars.

    Child-related pedestrian collisions in my opinion don't happen with people doing 50km/hr. It happens with distracted or aggressive drivers: things we already have laws against.
    Last edited by bhaskar21; 23-10-2017 at 02:10 PM.

  18. #218

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    Quote Originally Posted by bhaskar21 View Post


    Take into account the number of people it effects. Thats millions of hours lost of efficiency. For Nothing. I guess not nothing, for Medwards to go "THINK OF THE CHILDRENNNN!!!"
    Millions of lost hours? I see that from the rest of your post that you just want to lash out and rant without any real regards to facts, or numbers, but I thought this part was funny, and warranted a reply. How did you come to this exact number?



    and if you don't mind responding in kind...

    if all the world only cared about lost hours in your commute, why bother with speed limits at all? just go as fast as your frucking car can go. Who cares about anything else in the world!!! GOT TO MAKE MUH KILLLER COMMUTE TIME RECORD AGAIN!!!! I COULD LIVE CLOSER TO WORK, BUT DAMN IVESON WANTS TO PHOTO RADAR MY *** CAUSE I WANT TO DRIVE AS FAST AS HUMANLY POSSIBLE TO MAKE UP FOR MY BAD CHOICE TO LIVE SO FAR AWAY!!!!
    Last edited by Medwards; 23-10-2017 at 02:57 PM.

  19. #219

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bhaskar21 View Post


    Take into account the number of people it effects. Thats millions of hours lost of efficiency. For Nothing. I guess not nothing, for Medwards to go "THINK OF THE CHILDRENNNN!!!"
    Millions of lost hours? I see that from the rest of your post that you just want to lash out and rant without any real regards to facts, or numbers, but I thought this part was funny, and warranted a reply. How did you come to this exact number?



    and if you don't mind responding in kind...

    if all the world only cared about lost hours in your commute, why bother with speed limits at all? just go as fast as your frucking car can go. Who cares about anything else in the world!!! GOT TO MAKE MUH KILLLER COMMUTE TIME RECORD AGAIN!!!! I COULD LIVE CLOSER TO WORK, BUT DAMN IVESON WANTS TO PHOTO RADAR MY *** CAUSE I WANT TO DRIVE AS FAST AS HUMANLY POSSIBLE TO MAKE UP FOR MY BAD CHOICE TO LIVE SO FAR AWAY!!!!
    There are million of lost hours. I just showed you how I lose 8 hours a year from one side of one playground. Edmonton is a city of more than a million. Its easy to say that its millions of hours of productivity lost in a year.

    And seeing how you're having a meltdown because you actually have nothing to back up your arguments except with "think of children". I have already said we need a study done to see what speeds are safe for what neighborhoods. I am a civil engineer and I know there are design speeds which are ~10 kms less than the posted speeds (i do county roads, not sure if city roads are the same). And then we have speeds which are posted for public safety (such as all residential areas being 50km/hr).

    Do a study, find whats safe, what are the cost/benefit. where is the 30km/hr speed limit coming from? Why isn't it 40 or 50 or 20 or 10? Who is being effective? What is causing child-pedestrian collisions? How often are they at playgrounds? Whats the effectiveness of fences?

    If you're going to just put down random signs for 30 km/hr around the city, then don't go around claiming its for child safety. Its just for generating photo radar revenue and lowers the overall quality of living.

    Also, its very rude to assume people made a "bad choice" to live far away. The housing industry is extremely expensive, most people can't afford to live two blocks away from their job and go on the internet and ramble on at people who point out reckless and idiotic reduction in posted speeds. (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.8f675804fd05)

    Next time you post, come back with facts instead of having another meltdown.
    Last edited by bhaskar21; 23-10-2017 at 03:09 PM.

  20. #220

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    meltdown? I was responding to you in kind. Echo'ing your meltdown. (I guess not nothing, for Medwards to go "THINK OF THE CHILDRENNNN!!!")

    I've posted facts here, on this discussion, and many of the speeding threads on c2e. Most of them get ignored, or dismissed. Go find them.

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  23. #223

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    Just about every other municipality in Alberta, or even Canada has 30km/h playground and school zones. Edmonton was anomaly.

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    do you need some more ?

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  34. #234

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    While I see you're continuing to have another meltdown while you spam this post. None of your links say anything about the questions I am asking for. Yes, higher speeds lead to a higher risk of injury. We clearly have agreed to take on some of that risk because we are all still driving vehicles. With every link you have posted, I can make an argument of driving 10km/hr EVERYWHERE. Kids live everywhere, and speed is dangerous, why aren't we slowing down 10? Its just a few minutes of your time everyday.

    I can also google "speed and injury to risk" as well.
    Last edited by bhaskar21; 23-10-2017 at 03:19 PM.

  35. #235

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    Actually yes, all my links do.

    It furthers my point that you just want to sit up on pedestal and complain.

    You didn't read a single one of my links. Whats the point of continuing with you? You haven't provided any facts your self, besides:

    "I'm a civil engineer"

  36. #236

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    The burden of proof isn't on me. I have already said I would like an actual study done. I did skim through your links. The only relevant one was the last one. And thats why earlier in the post I said that the speed limits should be reduced in playgrounds in developed neighborhoods because the roads are narrower and cars park on either sides giving a driver little time to stop. This is not the case with millbourne Road Or 76 street or 86 street by wagner. The roads are very wide and cars arent parked next to the park giving drivers far more visibility and time to stop.

  37. #237
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    I do very much feel that depending on the area, there should be lower speed limits. School zones are very important and definitely useful. The concept of the playground zone is also good in theory, but in practice I question some of the locations and feel that some zones should be reviewed. The primary example I can think of is the playground zone on 76 street that stretches from 41 Ave to Millbourne Road East that was mentioned a bit earlier. For those who are not familiar with this stretch, 76st is a major road, major bus route into mill woods. The playground in question is an empty field that is typically only used during the summer months for youth minor soccer on makeshift soccer pitches. The rest of the time there is little to no children playing in this empty field, as it is just an empty field with grass, and nothing to attract kids to this field unless it is for organized play. This has been like this for the past 30 years at least. If this field were to be used more often I'm all for a limit change but as it is now I find it pretty useless to slow down for a normally empty field.

    One other location that I have issue with is further north along 86st along the Wagner Sports field. First of all the entire field is separated from the road with a fence along road. Second, other than High School students using the field, Chargers football using the field and soccer teams using the field, that area is anything but a playground.

    I feel the city has to go back and properly asses if limit change is actually necessary.
    LRT is our future, time to push forward.

  38. #238

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmcowboy11 View Post
    I do very much feel that depending on the area, there should be lower speed limits. School zones are very important and definitely useful. The concept of the playground zone is also good in theory, but in practice I question some of the locations and feel that some zones should be reviewed. The primary example I can think of is the playground zone on 76 street that stretches from 41 Ave to Millbourne Road East that was mentioned a bit earlier. For those who are not familiar with this stretch, 76st is a major road, major bus route into mill woods. The playground in question is an empty field that is typically only used during the summer months for youth minor soccer on makeshift soccer pitches. The rest of the time there is little to no children playing in this empty field, as it is just an empty field with grass, and nothing to attract kids to this field unless it is for organized play. This has been like this for the past 30 years at least. If this field were to be used more often I'm all for a limit change but as it is now I find it pretty useless to slow down for a normally empty field.

    One other location that I have issue with is further north along 86st along the Wagner Sports field. First of all the entire field is separated from the road with a fence along road. Second, other than High School students using the field, Chargers football using the field and soccer teams using the field, that area is anything but a playground.

    I feel the city has to go back and properly asses if limit change is actually necessary.
    Also adding that there is a fence between the playground and 76 street.

  39. #239

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    Quote Originally Posted by bhaskar21 View Post
    Once again, as I said earlier. The time loss isn't something I am majorly inconvenienced by. I have no problems slowing down to 30 when there are kids around.

    But I talked about time because the argument that we waste "a few seconds a year" is ridiculous. I waste 8 hours due to being on one street on one playground zone. Lets assume I miss 15 hours a year due to playground zones. Its found that an average commuter in the US wastes 42 hours a year commuting. (https://www.cnbc.com/2016/08/09/comm...each-year.html).

    We are adding 15 hours on top of that to Edmontonians each year. If I hit the snooze button once every two weeks, thats time that I sleep. Its not the same as time I spend on the road. You can't equate the two. One is good for me, the other is needlessly thrown on me because people can't stop yelling out "Think of the children" as loud as possible.

    Now this is an exaggeration but what if I said "hey Highlander, let me torture you 15 hours a year. Its the same as you pressing snooze on your alarm once a week, so its not a big deal".

    Commuting leads to general unhappiness (https://www.economist.com/blogs/gull...rils-commuting) so we are exposing commuters to our city to higher probabilities of depression and stress.

    Do a study, find what playgrounds and/or roads require lower speeds. Find out what that low speed should be and then find when are those lower speeds required and then enforce it.

    Claiming that this is for the safety of children is ridiculous. Neither you or Medwards are going to talk about examples that have been pointed out for playground zones been placed randomly for nothing but to catch commuters doing 35 and ticketing them.

    If the goal is to prevent any kid from getting any scratches then stop using vehicles altogether and start subsidizing self driving cars.

    Child-related pedestrian collisions in my opinion don't happen with people doing 50km/hr. It happens with distracted or aggressive drivers: things we already have laws against.
    You don't lie in bed for even a couple minutes between waking up and getting up, sometimes after the first alarm? You're a rare one.

    Sure you can torture me 15 hours a year. We'll do Chinese water torture. In 30 second chunks 4 times a day, and a water drop will fall on my face maybe once every week or two. the other episodes of water torture literally nothing will happen. and guess what? It won't be torture. Same with solitary confinement in "the hole". It only becomes worthwhile punishment or torture when it's all in a row. Split your solitary confinement into short episodes and it's a nice relaxing time away from responsibilities.

    Just like your horrible experience with losing time in amounts that disappear into the rounding error of your regular daily commute. Use it to practice deep breathing.

    while I understand that some locations are more urgent than others, I don't see how having all those cars that pass by my neighbourhood go slower could possibly be a bad thing.
    There can only be one.

  40. #240

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    Ahh, the classic a couple minutes everyday argument. Atleast you're being a bit more realistic finally than "a few seconds a year".

    And no, as I said earlier, you can't equate the two. Even if a person takes two minutes between getting up and my alarm going off, he won't stop doing that just because of stupidly located playground zones. So it is lost time. And as I have said its not an inconvenience for me. I just want to get rid of the argument when people like you claim "its a few seconds a year". It adds up.

    And I like to torture through the means of slapping people's faces. If you have ever seen How I met your mother, its one of the worst ways to torture, haha. So I will take you up on that offer of doling them out 30 seconds at a time 4 times a day. Please provide more details as I am very interested in this.

  41. #241

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    I have said its not an inconvenience for me
    but yet, you need to dwell on this thread over the loss of less than 30 seconds a day. You've probably lost more time dickering on this thread than you will lose in playground zones over a the course of a decade.

  42. #242

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    I'm not sure I've heard of a falser equivalency than between physical assault and waiting.
    But whatever. To illustrate the difference between time "wasted" in tiny bits versus 5 hours a year, I assume you'll take me up on this offer:

    You can place my head underwater for 30 seconds twice a day.
    You will have your face submerged once annually.



    That you willingly waste time in small chunks throughout your day, including by hitting snooze, means only this:

    You don't actually care about your time in small amounts. You don't even notice.
    There can only be one.

  43. #243

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I have said its not an inconvenience for me
    but yet, you need to dwell on this thread over the loss of less than 30 seconds a day. You've probably lost more time dickering on this thread than you will lose in playground zones over a the course of a decade.
    A year costs more than 8 hours. And it isn't 30 seconds a day. Just saying. I have no problems slowing down to 30 when required. I am happy to see this being implemented. I used to rent by 108 st and 73 ave right next to Queen victoria park (i think). The roads were narrow there and only one car could drive through the road at a time because cars were parked on either sides of the road. So doing 30km/hr is something I am all for. I actually support that neighbourhood being 40km/hr throughout.

    But thats not the case for the two examples I have talked about above. They already placed photo radar trucks at millbourne road. There are no kids in this park, the road is insanely wide and there are fences and they are ticketing people doing 40 here. The city is using this for revenue. Not for public safety. If they cared about public safety, then they would actually ticket people at a playground where there are kids around.

  44. #244

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander II View Post
    I'm not sure I've heard of a falser equivalency than between physical assault and waiting.
    But whatever. To illustrate the difference between time "wasted" in tiny bits versus 5 hours a year, I assume you'll take me up on this offer:

    You can place my head underwater for 30 seconds twice a day.
    You will have your face submerged once annually.



    That you willingly waste time in small chunks throughout your day, including by hitting snooze, means only this:

    You don't actually care about your time in small amounts. You don't even notice.
    Oh its an insane exaggeration and not in any way equivalent whatsoever.

    That said, I appreciate your offer and I will take you up on something. But not torture or anything ridiculous like we are talking. I am being serious this time. And I can do it with you as I said already, it isn't a huge inconvenience for me. Maybe before you drive/bike/walk to your work. Take 2 minutes, close your eyes and take deep breaths. everyday, even if you're running late!

  45. #245

    Default

    Two minutes now, that's starting to get somewhere.....

    Maybe I'm overstating my case too, my point is only that you can't count those hours up over a year and have a number that has any real value in determining what those delays might cost.

    In the grand scheme of things, I generally agree with what you're saying here. I would also far rather have blanket neighbourhood 40km/hr limits than indiscriminately placed 30 zones. While I conditionally support a blanket 30 limit on neighbourhood streets, I don't think it would be wise to do so without taking time to look at collectors as well as specific parts of neighbourhood street network that may behave more like a collector.

    Most arterials should be 50, but some should be 60 in industrial areas and suburban areas.
    Most collectors should be 40, but a few could be 50, and some should be 30
    Most neighbourhood streets should be 30, but there may be locations where what are currently neighbourhood streets should be re-classified as collectors.

    It won't be an easy process if they really intend to get it right.
    There can only be one.

  46. #246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaskar21 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I have said its not an inconvenience for me
    but yet, you need to dwell on this thread over the loss of less than 30 seconds a day. You've probably lost more time dickering on this thread than you will lose in playground zones over a the course of a decade.
    A year costs more than 8 hours. And it isn't 30 seconds a day. Just saying. I have no problems slowing down to 30 when required. I am happy to see this being implemented. I used to rent by 108 st and 73 ave right next to Queen victoria park (i think). The roads were narrow there and only one car could drive through the road at a time because cars were parked on either sides of the road. So doing 30km/hr is something I am all for. I actually support that neighbourhood being 40km/hr throughout.

    But thats not the case for the two examples I have talked about above. They already placed photo radar trucks at millbourne road. There are no kids in this park, the road is insanely wide and there are fences and they are ticketing people doing 40 here. The city is using this for revenue. Not for public safety. If they cared about public safety, then they would actually ticket people at a playground where there are kids around.
    I dont live in the area, but familiar with the road you are talking about. I haven't been around since they started doing this, but will check it out next time I'm around.

    However, I'm sure you are already aware, photo radar money doesn't go into general city revenue at all. It goes straight into other traffic safety initiatives. But since you are a 'civil engineer' and speak so freely on these issues and pretend to be quite knowledgeable and informed on these issues, I'm sure you already knew that, and you were testing the rest of us.

  47. #247

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bhaskar21 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I have said its not an inconvenience for me
    but yet, you need to dwell on this thread over the loss of less than 30 seconds a day. You've probably lost more time dickering on this thread than you will lose in playground zones over a the course of a decade.
    A year costs more than 8 hours. And it isn't 30 seconds a day. Just saying. I have no problems slowing down to 30 when required. I am happy to see this being implemented. I used to rent by 108 st and 73 ave right next to Queen victoria park (i think). The roads were narrow there and only one car could drive through the road at a time because cars were parked on either sides of the road. So doing 30km/hr is something I am all for. I actually support that neighbourhood being 40km/hr throughout.

    But thats not the case for the two examples I have talked about above. They already placed photo radar trucks at millbourne road. There are no kids in this park, the road is insanely wide and there are fences and they are ticketing people doing 40 here. The city is using this for revenue. Not for public safety. If they cared about public safety, then they would actually ticket people at a playground where there are kids around.
    I dont live in the area, but familiar with the road you are talking about. I haven't been around since they started doing this, but will check it out next time I'm around.

    However, I'm sure you are already aware, photo radar money doesn't go into general city revenue at all. It goes straight into other traffic safety initiatives. But since you are a 'civil engineer' and speak so freely on these issues and pretend to be quite knowledgeable and informed on these issues, I'm sure you already knew that, and you were testing the rest of us.
    You should take a drive there and see. In fact, give Millwoods a go and see how it is because it is designed in such a weird way that busy road ways for some reason have playground zones. I thought when they were doing this that any place that was fenced in would be exempt.

    Like I said, I am not against playground zones as long as they are in areas where it makes sense and not just randomly plopped down on streets cause some guy in the city opened up google maps and saw a large green space and decided that kids must be all over this location cause how can they not? Put up the signs he says!

  48. #248
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bhaskar21 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I have said its not an inconvenience for me
    but yet, you need to dwell on this thread over the loss of less than 30 seconds a day. You've probably lost more time dickering on this thread than you will lose in playground zones over a the course of a decade.
    A year costs more than 8 hours. And it isn't 30 seconds a day. Just saying. I have no problems slowing down to 30 when required. I am happy to see this being implemented. I used to rent by 108 st and 73 ave right next to Queen victoria park (i think). The roads were narrow there and only one car could drive through the road at a time because cars were parked on either sides of the road. So doing 30km/hr is something I am all for. I actually support that neighbourhood being 40km/hr throughout.

    But thats not the case for the two examples I have talked about above. They already placed photo radar trucks at millbourne road. There are no kids in this park, the road is insanely wide and there are fences and they are ticketing people doing 40 here. The city is using this for revenue. Not for public safety. If they cared about public safety, then they would actually ticket people at a playground where there are kids around.
    I dont live in the area, but familiar with the road you are talking about. I haven't been around since they started doing this, but will check it out next time I'm around.

    However, I'm sure you are already aware, photo radar money doesn't go into general city revenue at all. It goes straight into other traffic safety initiatives. But since you are a 'civil engineer' and speak so freely on these issues and pretend to be quite knowledgeable and informed on these issues, I'm sure you already knew that, and you were testing the rest of us.
    I'm glad to see some evidence of improvements being done - hopefully with the cash that was 'donated' to the traffic safety initiative. I do not drive DT too often, but did notice the pedestrian lights on Sask Drive, between 99st and 100 st. I'm all for this.

  49. #249
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    Quote Originally Posted by Highlander II View Post
    Two minutes now, that's starting to get somewhere.....

    Maybe I'm overstating my case too, my point is only that you can't count those hours up over a year and have a number that has any real value in determining what those delays might cost.

    In the grand scheme of things, I generally agree with what you're saying here. I would also far rather have blanket neighbourhood 40km/hr limits than indiscriminately placed 30 zones. While I conditionally support a blanket 30 limit on neighbourhood streets, I don't think it would be wise to do so without taking time to look at collectors as well as specific parts of neighbourhood street network that may behave more like a collector.

    Most arterials should be 50, but some should be 60 in industrial areas and suburban areas.
    Most collectors should be 40, but a few could be 50, and some should be 30
    Most neighbourhood streets should be 30, but there may be locations where what are currently neighbourhood streets should be re-classified as collectors.

    It won't be an easy process if they really intend to get it right.
    I think you proposed limits are generally 10 km/h too slow. Speed limits are supposed to feel a little too fast to most drivers. I would suggest:

    Arterials should generally be 60 km/h. 70 or 80 km/h limits would make sense in some areas where rights of way are wider and there are barriers separating the road from the nearest houses, and 50 km/h in some older areas where there is street parking and/or houses right next to the street without a barrier.
    Collectors should generally be 50 km/h, except possibly in a few locations in older areas where narrow roads that may not have originally been intended as collectors have become collectors (those could be 40 km/h).
    Neighborhood streets should be generally be 40 km/h. 30 km/h would be appropriate in neighborhoods where oncoming traffic is not able to pass without someone pulling over (conditions typically found on roads less than 9 m wide where parking is allowed on both sides) Wider neighborhood streets (where oncoming traffic can pass easily even when there are parked vehicles on either side) should be narrowed so that the 40 km/h limit does not feel too slow.

    I do not support playground zones. All playgrounds should be fenced wherever they face arterial or collector roads, and pedestrian lights installed if needed.

  50. #250

    Default

    I completely agree with the 30km/h limit through residential areas! Honestly, it only takes 1-2 minutes to get to any major road/artery anyways, so dropping the limit isn't going to be a big deal.

    I live on a corner in a residential area where the speed limit is 50. In the last 3 years I've seen at least 10 accidents on my corner, and someone slid out and took out a fire hydrant, someone else slid into a bus stop area and took the bus stop sign down. My corner is a 2-way stop, not 4-way, and the road has cars parked on both sides. It's very hard to see someone coming down the road as you creep out to see if it's safe to turn when they're doing 50. Unfortunately many people are doing 60 or higher! Especially in the mornings when they're heading to work, and in the evening. Hell, I've seen several people in the late evening doing AT LEAST 80!

    Not only would this help for safety, but also noise pollution from all the jackarses with loud motorcycles, pickup trucks and little cars with fart cans speeding by.

    As for the playground limits, they should all be 30, definitely, but there are a few new ones that I've noticed which I do question. Their posted hours are 6AM to 9PM! The 9PM is a little excessive and I have a feeling that the only reason they do it is to catch people off guard and hand out speeding tickets because they used to all be until 4:30PM. Your young child probably shouldn't be playing at the playground by themselves at 8PM if they're too young to be able to walk around the neighborhood alone safely. The only reason I have a complaint about that 9PM is because it seems sneaky. Just make all neighborhoods 30 and be done with it. This is how it is in Europe and it works just fine there. I never complained about it and found it quite nice.
    Last edited by alkeli; 16-11-2017 at 10:17 AM.

  51. #251

    Default

    In my neighborhood we now have the 30km/h speed limit sign in 2 spots about 3 blocks apart.

    One is the schoolzone, which is now the playground 30 km/h 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. rule and the other is the regulated playground.

    Unfortunately, the majority of the drivers who pass these roads are not complying with the signs.

    Either they can't read, or ignoring the signs or just refuse to drive that slow and are taking their chances.

  52. #252

    Default

    Similar in my neighbourhood. Some dude in a BroRam actually passed me because I was doing the speed limit of 30km/h, using the opposite side of the road, while keeping his horn pressed and the middle finger extended towards me. All that rage, and I still ended up right behind him at the next red light, and the next one, and then the next one, before he went off another direction than me.

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