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Thread: Restrict semi-trucks to right lane on highways (Henday)

  1. #1

    Lightbulb Restrict semi-trucks to right lane on highways (Henday)

    The time has come again of sloppy slippery roads, and I see the same issue every winter. Or I should say, I see it year-round but it's a bigger problem in the winter.

    Semi-trucks in middle and left lanes on the Henday. Some of the time, they're well exceeding the speed limit and are pushing 115-120 km/h even in bad weather. No surprise that you see them sometimes in the ditch or the grass median strip between opposing direction. They obviously can't do emergency maneuvers or stops as quick as cars can.

    Other issues with them being in the lanes is they either block traffic, obstruct view, or they're riding your bumper even if you're going 105 km/h. Lastly, and my most annoying one, the elephant races. When one transport truck decides to pass another, but is only going 0.25 km/h faster, so it takes him 5 minutes to pass.

    My opinion is that they should be restricted to the far-right lane and not allowed to pass on the Henday. There are several areas where they push their way over and cut off traffic for no reason. For example, southbound on the henday after you pass the yellowhead: The merging lane doesn't end, the Henday goes from 2 to 3 lanes after the merge lane is added. Yet every transport truck feels the need to immediately move over to the middle lane for no reason, and end up cutting off traffic that is travelling faster than them. Even if you're about to pass, they still cut you off.

    This is not a new idea. I lived in Germany for several years, and on the highways/autobahns there, transport trucks are not allowed to exceed 100km/h (There is no speed limit on the autobahn) and they are not allowed to pass. They must all stay in the right lane at all times. This allows faster traffic to move freely, especially if there is a traffic jam since the semis can't accelerate as fast during stop-and-go traffic. Here, they take up all lanes during a jam, slowing the entire flow even more than if they stayed in one lane. They're not going to get anywhere any faster by taking all the lanes because they're all slow at accelerating.

    So this is my suggestion, and I'm just curious to hear about people agreeing or disagreeing. I do understand that truckers have a schedule to keep. But honestly, they're not going to get places any faster by clogging up all the lanes of the Henday (Again, elephant races). I think the Henday would be a good pilot project to get it going. As someone who drives long distances on it every day, I see how badly they disrupt the flow of traffic, and winter just makes it so much worse.

  2. #2

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    Totally agree but it should be done province wide. I was in 5 countries in Europe recently and trucks are highly regulated. I did not see a 100km/hr speed limit in Germany for truck, it is actually 80km/hr.

    There is a general speed limit of 80 km/h (50 mph) for trucks with a GVWR over 3,500 kg (7,716 lbs) and for vehicles with trailers. For vehicles with a GVWR of over 7,500 kg (16,534 lbs) the limit is set to 60 km/h (37 mph) except on autobahns (also 80 km/h). For coaches and cars with trailers the limit is increased to 100 km/h on autobahns (under certain requirements). Posted speed signs for trucks are not common, they can be seen on some dangerous curves or descents.
    Trucks over 3,500 kg are required to have a built-in speed limiter for a maximum speed of 90 km/h (56 mph), and buses for a maximum speed of 100 km/h (62 mph). There are a few exceptions for army, police, fire brigade or scientific purposes.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_limits_in_Germany
    https://trip.studentnews.eu/s/4086/7...-in-Europe.htm
    Trucks religiously hug the right hand lane and are regularly seen in convoy. It works very well and I would like to see a 100km/hr max for trucks and a ban on using the left or center lane except to pass with a time limit on our roadways
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
    Totally agree but it should be done province wide. I was in 5 countries in Europe recently and trucks are highly regulated. I did not see a 100km/hr speed limit in Germany for truck, it is actually 80km/hr.

    There is a general speed limit of 80 km/h (50 mph) for trucks with a GVWR over 3,500 kg (7,716 lbs) and for vehicles with trailers. For vehicles with a GVWR of over 7,500 kg (16,534 lbs) the limit is set to 60 km/h (37 mph) except on autobahns (also 80 km/h). For coaches and cars with trailers the limit is increased to 100 km/h on autobahns (under certain requirements). Posted speed signs for trucks are not common, they can be seen on some dangerous curves or descents.
    Trucks over 3,500 kg are required to have a built-in speed limiter for a maximum speed of 90 km/h (56 mph), and buses for a maximum speed of 100 km/h (62 mph). There are a few exceptions for army, police, fire brigade or scientific purposes.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_limits_in_Germany
    https://trip.studentnews.eu/s/4086/7...-in-Europe.htm
    Trucks religiously hug the right hand lane and are regularly seen in convoy. It works very well and I would like to see a 100km/hr max for trucks and a ban on using the left or center lane except to pass with a time limit on our roadways
    That must have changed to 80 very recently. I lived there from 2010 to 2014, semi trucks and any vehicle with a trailer were both 100 km/h (And had round white stickers on the back stating so), so the right lane was always semis and vehicles with trailers.

    Like this:

    I agree that it does work very well! Traffic flowed so much better, especially when it got thick. On another note, there was that time when Canada started putting governors in semi trucks that restricted their speed as well, not sure if you heard about that one. One trucker got caught because he disabled it and had to go to court. He argued that limiting his speed caused a safety issue in case of emergency. The judge was obviously clueless about how a speed limiter in no way affects how fast you can accelerate, and he threw the whole thing out, and all the governor requirements got trashed. I hope we get to see that requirement come back again.
    Last edited by alkeli; 16-11-2017 at 10:09 AM.

  4. #4

    Default

    In Quebec trucks are speed-limited to 105km/hr but you see them daily going 110 or 115 in the center lane..

    That Ontario case was overturned and the speed-limiter law on truck is still the law

    Court Upholds Ontario Truck Speed Limiter Law

    Posted: Sep 8, 2015 11:19 AM | Last Updated: Sep 9, 2015 3:51 PM https://www.todaystrucking.com/court...ed-limiter-law
    TORONTO -- An Ontario appeals court ruled last week that speed limiters preventing trucks from going faster that 105 kilometers are legal, upholding earlier passed provincial legislation.


    The case dates back to 2009 when truck driver Gene Michaud was ticketed for not having his speed limiter set properly. He challenged the citation and won a court decision in 2012, only to have it overturned on appeal by the province in 2014 and last week.


    Michaud cited such dangers as his inability to accelerate at exits and on ramps where there is considerable friction between vehicles traveling at different speeds; his inability to pass slower vehicles in a timely manner; and his inability to maneuver out of a “jack-knife” situation by way of acceleration, Transport Topics newspaper reported.


    According to CBC News, Michaud, backed by the U.S.-based Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA), wanted the speed limiter legislation struck down. With this latest decision, the legislation stays, said David Crocker, the Toronto-based lawyer who argued for the OOIDA, which has been outspoken against the devices.

    MTO Study: Speed Limiters Drastically Improve Truck Highway Safety

    Speed-related, at-fault collisions involving large commercial vehicles fell by a whopping 73 percent after mandatory speed limiter legislation took effect in Ontario, according to a recent study by the Ontario Ministry of Transpiration. The drop in truck collisions was significantly greater than the decrease found in other vehicle drivers (30%).

    Despite skeptics’ insistence before the rule took effect that slowing down large trucks would inadvertently lead to more collisions with passenger cars and other vehicles, the study concluded there is absolutely no evidence speed limiters have contributed to an increase in truck drivers involved in other types of collisions post-2009, including rear-end crashes.


    Moreover, the study also dispelled the myth that in a speed limiter environment, drivers adjust their driving behaviour to compensate for any perceived time lost as a result of driving slower.


    The year-long study conducted between 2014-2015 examined data from pre- (2006-200 and post- (2010-2012) speed limiter legislation by using fatal, injury and police reported property damage collisions on high-speed highways. It also looked at MTO enforcement officers’ large vehicle driver speed data, among other real-world data.


    The Ontario Trucking Association, a strong proponent of mandatory speed limiters, worked closely with the Ontario government at the time to get the rule enacted.


    Additional highlights from the study include:


    Drivers of large trucks produced fewer at-fault speed collisions relative to all at-fault driver actions, post 2009;
    No evidence to indicate worse collision outcomes for large truck drivers post 2009;
    The percentage of truck drivers struck in the rear (of all collisions), stayed the same from pre- to post legislation (10.03 % of total collisions 2006-2008 and 10.47% 2010-2012) while the rate increased for other drivers (18.6% 2006-2008; and 21.3% 2010-2012).
    Going forward, the study suggests to realize the full benefits of the speed limiters, MTO will focus more attention to improving enforcement solutions.
    http://ontruck.org/mto-study-speed-l...ighway-safety/
    Also
    https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/motorvehicl...7-menu-364.htm
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
    In Quebec trucks are speed-limited to 105km/hr but you see them daily going 110 or 115 in the center lane..

    That Ontario case was overturned and the speed-limiter law on truck is still the law

    Court Upholds Ontario Truck Speed Limiter Law

    Posted: Sep 8, 2015 11:19 AM | Last Updated: Sep 9, 2015 3:51 PM https://www.todaystrucking.com/court...ed-limiter-law
    TORONTO -- An Ontario appeals court ruled last week that speed limiters preventing trucks from going faster that 105 kilometers are legal, upholding earlier passed provincial legislation.


    The case dates back to 2009 when truck driver Gene Michaud was ticketed for not having his speed limiter set properly. He challenged the citation and won a court decision in 2012, only to have it overturned on appeal by the province in 2014 and last week.


    Michaud cited such dangers as his inability to accelerate at exits and on ramps where there is considerable friction between vehicles traveling at different speeds; his inability to pass slower vehicles in a timely manner; and his inability to maneuver out of a “jack-knife” situation by way of acceleration, Transport Topics newspaper reported.


    According to CBC News, Michaud, backed by the U.S.-based Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA), wanted the speed limiter legislation struck down. With this latest decision, the legislation stays, said David Crocker, the Toronto-based lawyer who argued for the OOIDA, which has been outspoken against the devices.

    MTO Study: Speed Limiters Drastically Improve Truck Highway Safety

    Speed-related, at-fault collisions involving large commercial vehicles fell by a whopping 73 percent after mandatory speed limiter legislation took effect in Ontario, according to a recent study by the Ontario Ministry of Transpiration. The drop in truck collisions was significantly greater than the decrease found in other vehicle drivers (30%).

    Despite skeptics’ insistence before the rule took effect that slowing down large trucks would inadvertently lead to more collisions with passenger cars and other vehicles, the study concluded there is absolutely no evidence speed limiters have contributed to an increase in truck drivers involved in other types of collisions post-2009, including rear-end crashes.


    Moreover, the study also dispelled the myth that in a speed limiter environment, drivers adjust their driving behaviour to compensate for any perceived time lost as a result of driving slower.


    The year-long study conducted between 2014-2015 examined data from pre- (2006-200 and post- (2010-2012) speed limiter legislation by using fatal, injury and police reported property damage collisions on high-speed highways. It also looked at MTO enforcement officers’ large vehicle driver speed data, among other real-world data.


    The Ontario Trucking Association, a strong proponent of mandatory speed limiters, worked closely with the Ontario government at the time to get the rule enacted.


    Additional highlights from the study include:


    Drivers of large trucks produced fewer at-fault speed collisions relative to all at-fault driver actions, post 2009;
    No evidence to indicate worse collision outcomes for large truck drivers post 2009;
    The percentage of truck drivers struck in the rear (of all collisions), stayed the same from pre- to post legislation (10.03 % of total collisions 2006-2008 and 10.47% 2010-2012) while the rate increased for other drivers (18.6% 2006-2008; and 21.3% 2010-2012).
    Going forward, the study suggests to realize the full benefits of the speed limiters, MTO will focus more attention to improving enforcement solutions.
    http://ontruck.org/mto-study-speed-l...ighway-safety/
    Also
    https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/motorvehicl...7-menu-364.htm

    Ahhh! I never heard about it getting overturned in 2014, that's great! Now if every province can get on board with this....

    One question though (bolded in the quote above), who exactly works at the Ministry of Transpiration? And what exactly do they do there? Help plants? lol
    Last edited by alkeli; 16-11-2017 at 11:00 AM.

  6. #6

    Default

    I'd support this notion in area of the Henday that are 3 or more lanes wide per direction. In the sections where there is only 2 lanes per direction, its not really practical as trucks need to move over to allow the moronic drivers in this city who can't merge properly (Those that think doing 60-80 at the merge point, or better yet, think the merge point is a stop line)

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I'd support this notion in area of the Henday that are 3 or more lanes wide per direction. In the sections where there is only 2 lanes per direction, its not really practical as trucks need to move over to allow the moronic drivers in this city who can't merge properly (Those that think doing 60-80 at the merge point, or better yet, think the merge point is a stop line)
    Good point. Hopefully the entire Henday will be 3 lanes in the not too distant future. The two lane sections were a short-sighted mistake. But that's a whole other subject. I did get cut off again today at lunch on the westbound north leg by a semi just before Campbell Rd. The trucker decided to pass a bunch of cars, cutting me off, but then they all sped up and he ended up getting right back behind them again... Pointless!

  8. #8
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    In 3 lane portions they should restrict trucks to the middle and right lane. There would need to be an exception where there is a left lane exit QE2 NB onto AHD for example.

  9. #9
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    ^ I curse that QE2 / Henday mess every time I go through. Adherence to the "slower traffic keep right" rule was already poor north of Leduc before the Henday was built, and now with the stupid left lane exit you hardly ever see a trucker that isn't using the middle lane, or blocking the left lane by trying to pass another truck while going only marginally faster. The right lane is mostly empty, save for a few slow drivers trying to follow the rules and a few who get frustrated and try to use it as a passing lane.

  10. #10

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    The right lane between airport and henday is my secret way around all the slow movers! (Same with the section where the Hwy2A joins with 2 for a few miles and there is a third lane nobody uses somewhere after ponoka but before Lacombe), or the section from Airdrie to Carstairs or whereever that third lane ends just before a decent climb that trucks have trouble manintain speed on. Silly that the third lane ends before the hill climb, not after... )
    ---
    Cabbies are the worst offenders for taking the far left lane and then hovering around 10 under the speed limit on the way back into city. Exit off airport road on to QEII and immediately without any reason, occupy the far left lane.
    Last edited by Medwards; 21-11-2017 at 12:47 PM.

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