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Thread: Extreme cold weather knowledge, tips, best drinks, etc.

  1. #1

    Default Extreme cold weather knowledge, tips, best drinks, etc.

    I thought I’d start a thread to allow people to post their cold weather knowledge, tip, discoveries, etc.


    Why?
    Well, I was really surprised to hear the other week about the fairly extensive damage to some schools due to frozen (and then leaking) pipes. I’d have thought that such issues would be a thing of the past due to better design standards. What was it? 10 schools! Obviously such damage still isn’t very rare here - considering it gets fairly cold here.


    Everyone remember the slow drip method?

    10 Edmonton public schools saw flooding over holidays - Edmonton - CBC News

    Edmonton Fire Rescue Services has responded to 51 calls about water pipes since Monday night

    CBC News
    January 3, 2018

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...thaw-1.4471761






    Basement insulation- rim joist foaming:

    I’ll start with my house’s rim joist foaming experience - a potential close call. A few years back when I renovated my basement I had a installer foam the rim joist. However he also formed in my frost-proof exterior spigots and I thought nothing of it. However, the electrician who has done everything else in terms of home building spotted it and said I should cut the foam away from the pipe. Basically, more and better insulation means that in the cold, thd cold can now move further into the house - maybe past the valve.



    Here’s something else I didn’t know about at all:

    Charging cold batteries - Li-Ion batteries:

    “By not safe, I mean it will work fine until it randomly explodes...”


    Why charging Li-Ion batteries in cold temperatures would harm them? - Electrical Engineering Stack Exchange

    “...


    “Do not charge lithium ion batteries below 32F/0C. In other words, never charge a lithium ion battery that is below freezing.
    Doing so even once will result in a sudden, severe, and permanent capacity loss on the order of several dozen percent or more, as well a similar and also permanent increase in internal resistance. This damage occurs after just one isolated 'cold charging' event, and is proportional to the speed at which the cell is charged.

    But, even more importantly, a lithium ion cell that has been cold charged is NOT safe and must be safely recycled or otherwise discarded. By not safe, I mean it will work fine until it randomly explodes due to mechanical vibration, mechanical shock, or just reaching a high enough state of charge.

    Now, to actually answer your question: why is this?

    This requires a quick summary of how lithium ion batteries work. They have...”





    https://electronics.stackexchange.co...ould-harm-them

    More on other battery types:
    Charging Batteries at High and Low Temperatures – Battery University

    http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/a...w_temperatures



    Bolding mine
    Last edited by KC; 11-01-2018 at 07:37 PM.

  2. #2

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    Been a couple things I've heard on this. One is that the instruction is now to set thermostat further down to limit heating costs while the schools are not used during the holidays. this of course makes it easier to have frost broken pipes in deepfreeze weather cycles.

    The other thing I have heard is cost saving in terms of how many days during the holidays that people (caretakers,) are on site to monitor and check and run water occasionally to see how things are. We even live near a school and a difference noted this winter is no vehicle ever seen in the parking lot the entire duration of the holidays. Not saying that nobody ever stopped by the school but we were off, always around, and nobody was ever on site that we saw. Normally we would see a car or two on site with people in the school even during some holiday days.

    The first thing I thought when I heard 12 schools with ruptured pipes and flooding (and considerable flooding) is operationally mandated changes and less staffing hours during the Holidays.

    As far as rechargeable Lithium-Ion batteries I never leave any devise outside in the freezing car. Always bring them in. The first device I bought like this decades ago had such precaution in the directions. Now so many tech devices don't come with instructions and you have to find them online and people often don't read the advisories or precautions. Its not good for Li-Ion batteries to be left in the cold in anycase.
    Last edited by Replacement; 11-01-2018 at 07:45 PM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  3. #3

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    Something else - some people are using those foam water pipe insulation tubes as quick and easy winter fronts on their vehicles. Neat idea if it works on one’s grille design.



    Boosting car/truck fuel efficiency - grill blocking

    http://connect2edmonton.ca/showthrea...grill-blocking


    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    I was reading about some of the tricks people are pulling to boost their vehicle's fuel efficiency and found "grill blocking" very interesting since I imagine car and truck winter fronts probably improve fuel efficiency both via engine temperature optimization and aerodynamics. However, I've never heard of winter fronts being used for aerodynamic fuel efficiency gains. Seems they may be grossly underappreciated. (Same for what I thought were just cosmetic grill inserts on pickup trucks since they clearly must reduce air flow).

    Read this link...

    $11 worth of mods plus new tires - Car and Driver improves MPG by 25%

    http://www.ecomodder.com/blog/2008/0...ves-mpg-by-25/

    excerpt:
    "...Most cars’ grill openings are sized to keep the engine cool in absolute worst-case conditions (think Death Valley, pulling a trailer)... "


    Here's more - lots of fascinating discussions on improving gas mileage...

    http://ecomodder.com/forum/
    http://www.gassavers.org/index.php
    http://www.stumbleupon.com/tag/hypermiler/
    Last edited by KC; 12-01-2018 at 09:11 AM.

  4. #4

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    Best extreme cold weather drink


    The Glenlivet Nadurra, single malt Scotch whiskey 59.1%

    Keeps my veins from freezing.
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  5. #5

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    cold weather and winter advice:

    Don't eat yellow snow.
    Don't lick metal things.

  6. #6

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    Don’t run your vehicle in the garage, or in a snowbank.
    Last edited by KC; 12-01-2018 at 09:18 AM.

  7. #7

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    I run my car in my detached garage all the time. I did so this morning before heading for errands. What's the harm?

    (Obviously its an issue with attached garages...)

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I run my car in my detached garage all the time. I did so this morning before heading for errands. What's the harm?

    (Obviously its an issue with attached garages...)
    I’m not sure but don’t you wonder that that very action may mean you’ve already damaged yourself.

    Maybe (depending on wind speed and direction) your car is filling the passenger compartment with exhaust.

    Hmmm. Ever hear that most accident occur close to home.




    Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Garages (AEN-207) • Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering • Iowa State University

    How dangerous is it to operate an engine in a closed building? So dangerous that it must NEVER be done, even for a short time. The extremely high concentrations of carbon monoxide produced by an engine can raise CO concentrations in a closed building so quickly that a person may collapse before they even realize there is a problem. Carbon monoxide reduces the amount of oxygen to the brain, causing CO intoxication, and lack of reasoning. Studies by the Centers for Disease Control found that CO concentrations reach the Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) concentration of 1,200 parts per million (ppm) in only 7 minutes when a small 5 horsepower gasoline engine is run in a 10,000 cubic foot room. Iowa State University investigated the death of two men in a car wash. Operation of their poorly tuned truck in a closed car wash raised CO concentrations to the immediately dangerous concentration of 1200 ppm in less than 8 minutes. After only 22 minutes concentrations reached 3500 ppm. The two men had died without being able to move toward the outside door. Survivors of similar occurrences say they did not realize they were being poisoning, became dizzy, then quickly collapsed, and were unable to move toward the door.

    Is it safe to briefly warm up a car in an open garage? ...”


    https://www.abe.iastate.edu/extensio...rages-aen-207/

    Note: look at the example above mentioning the small 10,000 cuft room and then calculate the cubic feet in your garage. An average big double garage is probably half that!



    I’m back. Seems that your actions are ok with the US CDC:


    CDC - Carbon Monoxide Poisoning - Frequently Asked Questions


    “Never run your car or truck inside a garage that is attached to a house even with the garage door open. Always open the door to a detached garage to let in fresh air when you run a car or truck inside.”

    https://www.cdc.gov/co/faqs.htm
    Last edited by KC; 12-01-2018 at 10:12 AM.

  9. #9

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    I just open the garage door for a minute before going in, and don't spend any time in the garage if I've left the car running. Obviously you don't want to do this with an attached garage, and yes carbon monoxide is very dangerous.

    Maybe I am brain damaged, and Trump is actually a stable genius after-all.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I just open the garage door for a minute before going in, and don't spend any time in the garage if I've left the car running. Obviously you don't want to do this with an attached garage, and yes carbon monoxide is very dangerous.

    Maybe I am brain damaged, and Trump is actually a stable genius after-all.

  11. #11
    I'd rather C2E than work!
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    Default

    When mechanics run cars in garages, which they frequently do when working on cars in the shop in winter, they just run a flex pipe from the car's exhaust to a small flap in the garage door. Easy to do, and effective.
    Nisi Dominus Frustra

  12. #12

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    Remember your little four legged furry friends. Keep them warm too.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

  13. #13

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    knitted my python a sweater...
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

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