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Thread: Are you boycotting BC?

  1. #501

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    About 6 parts to this series. Most important to note is that some companies set up improved relationships 30 years ago and that way back in 2004 everyone got a heads up that development wouldn’t be able to steamroll over indigenous lands anymore.


    First Nations series: Staking claims in the B.C. economy

    http://www.vancouversun.com/life/fir...173/story.html


    First Nations series: Natives seen as better protectors of the land despite occasional clashes

    http://www.vancouversun.com/technolo...121/story.html
    Last edited by KC; 22-12-2018 at 06:24 AM.

  2. #502

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    Eagle Spirit president says pipeline from northern Alberta to Prince Rupert, B.C. could win NEB approval | Globalnews.ca

    “He says Eagle River has 100 per cent Indigenous backing along its route “

    “However, he repeated a threat to move the shipping point of the project to Alaska if the federal government approves Bill C-68, which would ban oil tankers from loading on the north coast.”

    https://globalnews.ca/news/4486622/e...ce-rupert-neb/
    Last edited by KC; 22-12-2018 at 06:26 AM.

  3. #503

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    Leave Victoria's 'raw sewage' alone, Alberta

    https://nationalpost.com/news/canada...-alone-alberta

  4. #504

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    Unceded territories and elected chiefs vs. hereditary chiefs


    Travelling the pipeline: Why the Secwepemc Nation is crucial for the Trans Mountain pipeline - APTN NewsAPTN News





    “It’s about jurisdiction over the band’s territory. He said the deal – and he credits Kinder Morgan for being “very transparent” throughout the negotiations – gives the community environmental oversight, including the ability to hire its own engineers to work on the pipeline.

    “The pipe could send apple juice. I really wouldn’t care. I want the environmental oversight and I want the tax authority. That’s what I want,” he says. “For me, it’s a jurisdiction issue.

    “We were fighting each other long before Canada got here.” ...”


    https://aptnnews.ca/2018/04/26/trave...tain-pipeline/
    Bands vs the people:

    Indigenous resistance, title make Trans Mountain pipeline extension ‘untenable,’ says economist - APTN NewsAPTN News

    “Cochrane says while discussion of the Trans Mountain controversy has centred on financial risk associated with legal and jurisdictional disputes between the province of British Columbia and the federal government, the project’s greatest financial threat is the risk associated with running the pipeline through unceded Indigenous lands.”

    ...

    Nicole Schabus, an assistant law professor at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, says while about half the Trans Mountain pipeline route crosses through Secwepemcul’ecw – the unceded territory of the Secwepemc people – Canada has never obtained their free, prior and informed consent.

    She says when Kinder Morgan suspended non-essential spending they pointed to the province of B.C. for the hold-up.

    “But the biggest uncertainty, legal and economic, comes from Indigenous peoples,” Schabus said.

    The Trans Mountain pipeline was built in 1953, at a time when Indigenous people couldn’t legally organize around the question of land title and jurisdiction, Schabus explains.

    Since then multiple Supreme Court of Canada decisions have strengthened Indigenous Peoples’ land rights, title and jurisdiction in decision-making processes about what happens on their unceded territories where no treaties exist that give title to the Crown.

    At least four Secwepemc First Nations along the pipeline route have signed onto the project, but Schabus says Aboriginal title and jurisdiction belong to the Secwepemc people themselves – not the bands established under Canada’s Indian Act – and the people are the “proper rights holders.”


    https://aptnnews.ca/2018/06/08/indig...s-economist-2/
    Elected chiefs vs. hereditary chiefs:

    Elected vs. hereditary chiefs: Pipeline showdown puts spotlight on division of power | CTV News Vancouver

    “But do both the elected chiefs and the hereditary chiefs speak for the group as a whole? Or does one take precedence?

    Elected chiefs

    Elected chiefs were created out of the Indian Act of 1876 by colonialists who came to North America, seized Indigenous Land and attempted to put their own system into place.

    The act created the elected chief and council system. These representatives are subject to elections held every two years.

    "It's incredibly simple," says Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, with the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs when asked about the differences. "Band councils have authorities, powers and jurisdiction on the reserve land base itself. And where the border of the reserve ends, so ends their power and jurisdiction."

    https://bc.ctvnews.ca/elected-vs-her...ower-1.4247466
    Last edited by KC; 10-01-2019 at 05:50 AM.

  5. #505

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    The minister was caught misspoking - consultations may be back on soon.

    Funny how people everywhere seem to want to be consulted.

    Alberta government waffles on Bighorn Country public consultations, will reschedule after backlash | Globalnews.ca


    There was a strong backlash, both online and in the form of a rally in Drayton Valley on Monday, where protesters voiced anger over what they called a lack of proper consultation.


    https://globalnews.ca/news/4828974/a...s-rescheduled/


    Trudeau apologizes for First Nation consultation failures on Trans Mountain pipeline

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he didn't expect "unanimity" from First Nations on the Trans Mountain pipeline project but apologized for his government's failure on consultation after a speech to the Assembly of First Nations on Tuesday.
    ...

    In a rare move, Trudeau, who has spoken to the AFN more times than any other prime minister, stayed to take unscripted questions from the floor.

    He immediately faced two pointed questions on the Trans Mountain pipeline project.

    "There was no consent," said Neskonlith First Nation Chief Judy Wilson.

    Wilson said mutual benefit agreements signed by some First Nations on the project did not amount to the consent of the people.

    "We have to get a proper process of consent, prime minister," said Wilson.

    The pipeline crosses about 513 km of the Secwepemc Nation, of which Neskonlith is a member.

    Trudeau, who addressed Wilson by her first name, said the British Columbia chief should be "careful" about "minimizing" positions taken by other First Nations that "disagree" with her.


    https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/t...line-1.4932663



    Last edited by KC; 10-01-2019 at 06:01 AM.

  6. #506
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    Another interesting wrinkle in the Coastal GasLink pipeline brouhaha:

    In addition to opposition from the hereditary chiefs of Wet'suwet'en Nation, the proposed Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline faces another battle that TransCanada says could put the project at risk.The National Energy Board (NEB) launched a multi-step process last fall to determine whether the $4.8-billion pipeline should fall under federal jurisdiction and perhaps undergo further regulatory review — ​potentially delaying the project for months.

    A hearing has not yet been scheduled, but the NEB has listed several filing deadlines between January and March.

    The 675-kilometre pipeline, which would move natural gas from Groundbirch, B.C., to Kitimat, B.C., for international export was cleared by provincial officials by April 2016. It is owned by TransCanada Corp., now officially known as TC Energy.

    ​https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/c...view-1.4971829

    It's somewhat emotionally satisfying to see BC Premier John Horgan possibly hung up on his own petard. On the other hand, the Shell LNG project also benefits Alberta by off-shoring some Northeastern BC natural gas to Asian markets, rather than having it flow through our province adding to the already glutted North American market.

  7. #507

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    Albertans should shun BC travel over province's 'holier than thou' attitude: Columnist | Daily Hive Vancouver
    March 4, 2019

    https://dailyhive.com/vancouver/calg...-about-bc-2019

    B.C. downplays tourism fears amid pipeline spat with Alberta, businesses call for cooler heads | Globalnews.ca
    April 9, 2019

    https://globalnews.ca/news/5148509/b...-spat-alberta/



    Should Albertans boycott B.C. travel over pipeline spat?

    CTVNews.ca Staff
    with reports from CTV Calgary’s Brenna Rose and CTV Vancouver’s St. John Alexander
    Published March 5, 2019

    https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/should...spat-1.4322720

    https://www.ctvnews.ca/mobile/canada...spat-1.4322720
    Last edited by KC; 14-04-2019 at 09:45 AM.

  8. #508
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    Quote Originally Posted by East McCauley View Post
    Another interesting wrinkle in the Coastal GasLink pipeline brouhaha:

    In addition to opposition from the hereditary chiefs of Wet'suwet'en Nation, the proposed Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline faces another battle that TransCanada says could put the project at risk.The National Energy Board (NEB) launched a multi-step process last fall to determine whether the $4.8-billion pipeline should fall under federal jurisdiction and perhaps undergo further regulatory review — ​potentially delaying the project for months.

    A hearing has not yet been scheduled, but the NEB has listed several filing deadlines between January and March.

    The 675-kilometre pipeline, which would move natural gas from Groundbirch, B.C., to Kitimat, B.C., for international export was cleared by provincial officials by April 2016. It is owned by TransCanada Corp., now officially known as TC Energy.

    ​https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/c...view-1.4971829

    It's somewhat emotionally satisfying to see BC Premier John Horgan possibly hung up on his own petard. On the other hand, the Shell LNG project also benefits Alberta by off-shoring some Northeastern BC natural gas to Asian markets, rather than having it flow through our province adding to the already glutted North American market.
    Just finished my engineering program. That project is in my crosshairs as I landed a job in the LML. Here’s to hoping both provinces can thrive together.

  9. #509

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    How do Vancouver’s, Victoria’s etc landfills compare with those in Alberta?

    The daily volumes might be a sign as to the amount of wasteful bad-for-the-environment consumption occurring in each jurisdiction.


    See these:

    15 of the Worlds Largest Landfills With Photos and Statistics | Owlcation

    https://owlcation.com/stem/15-of-the...gest-Landfills









    Vancouver:

    https://vancouver.ca/files/cov/vanco...final-2017.pdf



    That’s the dumps: Edmonton failing at diverting waste from landfill, audit finds – Edmonton Journal

    https://edmontonjournal.com/news/loc...agement-centre




    Kitchen waste piling up in Edmonton landfill since compost facility closed last fall

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmon...stem-1.4565158
    Last edited by KC; 19-04-2019 at 08:41 AM.

  10. #510

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    Horgan's acknowledgment of unceded Indigenous territory a milestone for B.C. - The Globe and Mail

    Excerpt:

    “That unique status – a province mostly built on territories that were never ceded through treaty, war or surrender by the original inhabitants – goes back more than 150 years. As a result, uncertainty has dogged economic development in the province, while the courts have been increasingly firm that the Crown in B.C. does not have clear title to the land and its resources.

    In the rush to establish the colony of British Columbia, governor James Douglas skipped over the stage of negotiating treaties. In 1859, he issued a proclamation that declared all the lands and resources in British Columbia belong to the Crown. At that time, the colony had about 1,000 Europeans and an estimated 30,000 Indigenous people.

    It was not until 2014 that the Supreme Court of Canada, in the Tsilhqot'in decision, ruled that Indigenous Canadians still own their ancestral lands unless they signed away their ownership in treaties with government. The province fought the Tsilhqot'in Nation, a small community of 400 people in the remote Nemaiah Valley west of Williams Lake, every inch of the way in the courts, but was finally forced to accept that aboriginal title exists.”

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news...ticle36686705/

  11. #511
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    NOT boycotting BC again. Got a nice room for the weekend at the BW Invermere Inn. Will be checking out the Fairmont Hot Springs tomorrow. Sonny Boy loves the water. Check out some fine dining and tour around. Weather isn’t super but who cares, we’re in the mountains of beautiful British Columbia! lol. Saw four bears right along the highway coming through Kootenay Park this evening.

  12. #512

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    I wonder how many are low-taxed Alberta retirees taking their savings to BC. Where they will be taxed more and people will praise BC’s world class city, infrastructure and greenness (tactfully remaining silent on the the sewers dumping raw sewage into the ocean, coal exports and oil burning ships welcomed to their harbours.)


    B.C.-Alberta trade worth $30B annually, with economies most intertwined in Canada: report | Globalnews.ca

    “more than 250,000 Albertans moving west in the last decade, the report found.”

    https://globalnews.ca/news/5286851/b...de-30-billion/


    Also, just like in the states, stopping Alberta’s exports coincidentally could have served them well by creating a surplus and depressing prices desperate exporters are willing to charge to stay afloat another day.
    Last edited by KC; 19-05-2019 at 09:12 AM.

  13. #513
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    I noticed there are more Alberta plates than BC ones in the ‘Columbia Valley’ this weekend.

  14. #514

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    I noticed there are more Alberta plates than BC ones in the ‘Columbia Valley’ this weekend.
    And it’s not even into the height of the tourist season yet.

    Buying Local: How It Boosts the Economy
    By Judith D. Schwartz Thursday, June 11, 2009

    “...A number of researchers and organizations are taking a closer look at how money flows, and what they're finding shows the profound economic impact of keeping money in town—and how the fate of many communities around the nation and the world increasingly depend on it.

    At the most basic level, when you buy local more... "That means those purchases are twice as efficient in terms of keeping the local economy alive," says author and NEF researcher David Boyle. (See the top 10 food trends of 2008.)

    Indeed, says Boyle, many local economies are languishing not because too little cash comes in, but as a result of what happens to that money. "Money is like blood. It needs to keep moving around to keep the economy going," he says, noting that when money is spent elsewhere—at big supermarkets, non-locally owned utilities and other services such as on-line retailers—"it flows out, like a wound." By shopping at the corner store instead of the big box, consumers keep their communities from becoming what the NEF calls "ghost towns" (areas devoid of neighborhood shops and services) or "clone towns", where Main Street now looks like every other Main Street with the same fast-food and retail chains.

    According to Susan Witt, Executive Director of the E.F. Schumacher Society, "buy local" campaigns serve another function: alerting ...”

    ...
    “And what about that higher cost of local goods?
    ...”

    “There's also the matter of local/regional resilience. Says Witt: "...we're still just a generation away from being a nation of producers. The question is: what economic framework will help us reclaim those skills and that potential." Say, for example,...”

    “Another argument for buying local is that it enhances the "velocity" of money, or circulation speed, in the area. The idea is that if currency circulates more quickly, the money ... "That means more goes into input costs—supplies and upkeep, printing, advertising, paying employees—which puts that money right back in the community."

    One way to really make sure money stays in the community is ...”



    http://content.time.com/time/busines...903632,00.html


    Last edited by KC; 20-05-2019 at 08:06 AM.

  15. #515

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    Opinion: Alberta can't keep spending more than it brings in
    BY JANICE MACKINNON
    MAY 9, 2019
    Excerpts:

    “When I was finance minister in Saskatchewan in the 1990s, I faced the prospect of the province going into bankruptcy. This was a result of a government that did not face the warning signs of higher debts and deficits and take the action required. Saskatchewan was able to balance the budget in the ’90s because its people realized that increasing debt means more money going to interest and less money for programs.”

    “Governments, like a household, cannot keep spending more money than they have revenue. Moreover, like a household, governments should review and prioritize their spending to ensure that they are getting the best outcomes for the money they spend.”


    “The truth is that continuing to spend unchecked will lead us to a future where draconian choices have to be made. ”

    “Under Premier Jason Kenney’s direction, we will review the province’s finances and provide Albertans with a clear picture of our current fiscal situation, the options going forward...”


    https://edmontonjournal.com/opinion/...n-it-brings-in

  16. #516

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    And as long as royalty payments keep flowing to general revenue, Alberta will be at the mercy of world oil prices that we have no control over. Prices go up, spend like a drunken sailor while materials and labour are commanding top dollar. When oil prices collapse, cut services to the bone.

  17. #517
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    ^^Except Janice MacKinnon was not Finance Minister in Saskatchewan during the period starting in 1991 when the budget was balanced through a combination of tax increases and spending cuts. My recollection is that MacKinnon became Finance Minister in 1995 during the Romanow government's second term after the budget had already been balanced.

    The Finance Minister during this the first term of the Romanow government was Ed Tchorzweski who died in 2008 and is not in the position to set the record straight.

    Tchorzewski served under NDP premiers Allan Blakeney and Roy Romanow.

    As finance minister in 1992, Tchorzewski inherited an almost billion-dollar deficit from the previous Progressive Conservative government. He brought in an austere budget, loaded with tax increases and spending cuts, to set the government on the road to balancing its books.

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saska...-dies-1.751395

  18. #518

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    Quote Originally Posted by East McCauley View Post
    ^^Except Janice MacKinnon was not Finance Minister in Saskatchewan during the period starting in 1991 when the budget was balanced through a combination of tax increases and spending cuts. My recollection is that MacKinnon became Finance Minister in 1995 during the Romanow government's second term after the budget had already been balanced.

    The Finance Minister during this the first term of the Romanow government was Ed Tchorzweski who died in 2008 and is not in the position to set the record straight.

    Tchorzewski served under NDP premiers Allan Blakeney and Roy Romanow.

    As finance minister in 1992, Tchorzewski inherited an almost billion-dollar deficit from the previous Progressive Conservative government. He brought in an austere budget, loaded with tax increases and spending cuts, to set the government on the road to balancing its books.

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saska...-dies-1.751395
    A lot of detail online in her book. Too hard for my old eyes to read on Google books via a small screen though.

    Anyway plug this title into your search engine:


    Minding the Public Purse: The Fiscal Crisis, Political Trade-offs and Canada's Future

  19. #519

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    Seems to be a bit of confusion here.

    The title says pipelines, the discussion is about storage.

    I don’t understand why storage could not be somewhere else and another pipeline used to deliver it to waters’ edge. Pipelines are pretty good at moving fluids about.


    LETTER: How is it in the national interest to impose pipelines on B.C.?
    North Shore News
    MARCH 22, 2019 12:59 PM

    “The universities in both Calgary and Edmonton are located in [similar] settings. The University of Alberta in Edmonton is above the beautiful North Saskatchewan River and adjacent to parks and residential areas. The University of Calgary is above the famous Bow River valley and adjacent to residential communities.

    In view of the horrific inferno at petrochemical storage facilities near Houston, Texas this week, it is incomprehensible to believe that either of these two great Alberta cities would ever allow the construction of oil storage facilities near their universities thereby imposing serious health and safety risks on their citizens in the nearby communities.”


    https://www.nsnews.com/opinion/lette...b-c-1.23768234
    Last edited by KC; 02-06-2019 at 09:19 AM.

  20. #520

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    As if hydro developments don’t cause massive environmental destruction.

    The use and abuse of air conditioning - The Globe and Mail

    “VICTORIA, BC: AUGUST 6, 2008 - ...the host at a "Cooling Party" organized by the B.C. Sierra Club in Victoria, feels a bit guilty about running an environmental footprint-enhancing air conditioner in her home during the party. Cooling Parties were created to help British Columbians tackle global warming in their homes and neighbourhoods, by providing information and how to reduce household greenhouse gas emissions and conserve energy.”

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opin...article585356/



    “BC Hydro data shows the number of B.C. households using air conditioning has more than tripled in the last 16 years, from just 10% of homes in 2001, to 34% in 2017. BC Hydro is predicting this trend will continue to grow as dry, hot summers become the new norm for B.C. – leading to higher electricity costs and record-breaking power demand in the summer months.”

    https://www.bchydro.com/content/dam/...-july-2018.pdf
    Last edited by KC; 12-06-2019 at 12:37 PM.

  21. #521
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    As if hydro developments don’t cause massive environmental destruction.

    The use and abuse of air conditioning - The Globe and Mail

    “VICTORIA, BC: AUGUST 6, 2008 - ...the host at a "Cooling Party" organized by the B.C. Sierra Club in Victoria, feels a bit guilty about running an environmental footprint-enhancing air conditioner in her home during the party. Cooling Parties were created to help British Columbians tackle global warming in their homes and neighbourhoods, by providing information and how to reduce household greenhouse gas emissions and conserve energy.”

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opin...article585356/



    “BC Hydro data shows the number of B.C. households using air conditioning has more than tripled in the last 16 years, from just 10% of homes in 2001, to 34% in 2017. BC Hydro is predicting this trend will continue to grow as dry, hot summers become the new norm for B.C. – leading to higher electricity costs and record-breaking power demand in the summer months.”

    https://www.bchydro.com/content/dam/...-july-2018.pdf
    Well since air conditioners run on electricity and BC's hydro electric system is still far cleaner and produces much less emissions than Alberta's then I guess it's not really an issue. The article you posted (which was originally written in 2011 and updated in 2018 ) doesn't really even mention BC except for the little paragraph at the front, which you copied to your post. Seems on par with all the little games you like to play KC

  22. #522

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    heading to BC tomorrow night for the weekend. Only Valemount, but still BC.

  23. #523

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    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    As if hydro developments don’t cause massive environmental destruction.

    The use and abuse of air conditioning - The Globe and Mail

    “VICTORIA, BC: AUGUST 6, 2008 - ...the host at a "Cooling Party" organized by the B.C. Sierra Club in Victoria, feels a bit guilty about running an environmental footprint-enhancing air conditioner in her home during the party. Cooling Parties were created to help British Columbians tackle global warming in their homes and neighbourhoods, by providing information and how to reduce household greenhouse gas emissions and conserve energy.”

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opin...article585356/



    “BC Hydro data shows the number of B.C. households using air conditioning has more than tripled in the last 16 years, from just 10% of homes in 2001, to 34% in 2017. BC Hydro is predicting this trend will continue to grow as dry, hot summers become the new norm for B.C. – leading to higher electricity costs and record-breaking power demand in the summer months.”

    https://www.bchydro.com/content/dam/...-july-2018.pdf
    Well since air conditioners run on electricity and BC's hydro electric system is still far cleaner and produces much less emissions than Alberta's then I guess it's not really an issue. The article you posted (which was originally written in 2011 and updated in 2018 ) doesn't really even mention BC except for the little paragraph at the front, which you copied to your post. Seems on par with all the little games you like to play KC
    The idea that hydro is environmentally friendly is ludicrous. The idea that just because it’s hydro generated power that ever more electricity can be used is ludicrous.

    What do you think demand growth does? What do you think flooding ever more valleys does?

    Hydro development obliterates ecosystems. But that’s ok compared to the risk from pipelines which might lead to oil spills in the sensitive river and ocean ecosystems? By analogy would it be ok to clear cut and strip mine vast areas of Jasper National Park as long as say construction of a coal fired generating plant in it was prevented?

    The singular focus on CO2 emissions and climate change while ignoring other critical and possibly more near term environmental risks is bizarre. Climate change is only one of many environmental issues we face.

    Avoiding emissions are also not a primary issue to the BC pipeline issue. If they were maybe they’d halt the massive exports of coal the ship out.

    The resistance has been over oil spills, land rights, consultation, tanker traffic...

    The growth in the use of A/C though highlights the demand side of the environmental issues. It’s a farce to cast Alberta, the producer, as being the evil party while the actual consumers continue to increase their demands for energy no matter the source.

    Say they decided to run their a/c off solar. Solar isn’t free energy. Solar too will cause massive environmental destruction from the input mining through to the possible clearing of vast swaths of land for solar electricity factories.
    Last edited by KC; 12-06-2019 at 03:40 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    heading to BC tomorrow night for the weekend. Only Valemount, but still BC.
    Planning to go to bc again the first week of July. Thinking maybe bcers are not caring for albertans right now. I bought an old camaro to match mine I have sitting at the farm. Maybe make one out of two. It had bc plates on it. Maybe I should take them along. I could go incognito. 😁

  25. #525
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    As if hydro developments don’t cause massive environmental destruction.

    The use and abuse of air conditioning - The Globe and Mail

    “VICTORIA, BC: AUGUST 6, 2008 - ...the host at a "Cooling Party" organized by the B.C. Sierra Club in Victoria, feels a bit guilty about running an environmental footprint-enhancing air conditioner in her home during the party. Cooling Parties were created to help British Columbians tackle global warming in their homes and neighbourhoods, by providing information and how to reduce household greenhouse gas emissions and conserve energy.”

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opin...article585356/



    “BC Hydro data shows the number of B.C. households using air conditioning has more than tripled in the last 16 years, from just 10% of homes in 2001, to 34% in 2017. BC Hydro is predicting this trend will continue to grow as dry, hot summers become the new norm for B.C. – leading to higher electricity costs and record-breaking power demand in the summer months.”

    https://www.bchydro.com/content/dam/...-july-2018.pdf
    Well since air conditioners run on electricity and BC's hydro electric system is still far cleaner and produces much less emissions than Alberta's then I guess it's not really an issue. The article you posted (which was originally written in 2011 and updated in 2018 ) doesn't really even mention BC except for the little paragraph at the front, which you copied to your post. Seems on par with all the little games you like to play KC
    The idea that hydro is environmentally friendly is ludicrous. The idea that just because it’s hydro generated power that ever more electricity can be used is ludicrous.

    What do you think demand growth does? What do you think flooding ever more valleys does?

    Hydro development obliterates ecosystems. But that’s ok compared to the risk from pipelines which might lead to oil spills in the sensitive river and ocean ecosystems? By analogy would it be ok to clear cut and strip mine vast areas of Jasper National Park as long as say construction of a coal fired generating plant in it was prevented?
    Interesting take. Seems to ignore most current consensus that hydro is still much better for the environment than burning natural gas. In fact some of the hydro power in BC comes from the least impactful hydro electric systems in North America

    But denial is okay too KC. Seems you're desperate to maintain status quo and false narrative that a large number of uneducated desperately cling to and Albertans believe

  26. #526

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    As if hydro developments don’t cause massive environmental destruction.

    The use and abuse of air conditioning - The Globe and Mail

    “VICTORIA, BC: AUGUST 6, 2008 - ...the host at a "Cooling Party" organized by the B.C. Sierra Club in Victoria, feels a bit guilty about running an environmental footprint-enhancing air conditioner in her home during the party. Cooling Parties were created to help British Columbians tackle global warming in their homes and neighbourhoods, by providing information and how to reduce household greenhouse gas emissions and conserve energy.”

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opin...article585356/



    “BC Hydro data shows the number of B.C. households using air conditioning has more than tripled in the last 16 years, from just 10% of homes in 2001, to 34% in 2017. BC Hydro is predicting this trend will continue to grow as dry, hot summers become the new norm for B.C. – leading to higher electricity costs and record-breaking power demand in the summer months.”

    https://www.bchydro.com/content/dam/...-july-2018.pdf
    Well since air conditioners run on electricity and BC's hydro electric system is still far cleaner and produces much less emissions than Alberta's then I guess it's not really an issue. The article you posted (which was originally written in 2011 and updated in 2018 ) doesn't really even mention BC except for the little paragraph at the front, which you copied to your post. Seems on par with all the little games you like to play KC
    The idea that hydro is environmentally friendly is ludicrous. The idea that just because it’s hydro generated power that ever more electricity can be used is ludicrous.

    What do you think demand growth does? What do you think flooding ever more valleys does?

    Hydro development obliterates ecosystems. But that’s ok compared to the risk from pipelines which might lead to oil spills in the sensitive river and ocean ecosystems? By analogy would it be ok to clear cut and strip mine vast areas of Jasper National Park as long as say construction of a coal fired generating plant in it was prevented?

    The singular focus on CO2 emissions and climate change while ignoring other critical and possibly more near term environmental risks is bizarre. Climate change is only one of many environmental issues we face.

    Avoiding emissions are also not a primary issue to the BC pipeline issue. If they were maybe they’d halt the massive exports of coal the ship out.

    The resistance has been over oil spills, land rights, consultation, tanker traffic...

    The growth in the use of A/C though highlights the demand side of the environmental issues. It’s a farce to cast Alberta, the producer, as being the evil party while the actual consumers continue to increase their demands for energy no matter the source.

    Say they decided to run their a/c off solar. Solar isn’t free energy. Solar too will cause massive environmental destruction from the input mining through to the possible clearing of vast swaths of land for solar electricity factories.
    Yeah, we'd never do anything like that here.



    And as far as this:

    It’s a farce to cast Alberta, the producer, as being the evil party while the actual consumers continue to increase their demands for energy no matter the source.
    I guess it's a farce to cast drug dealers as the evil party too then. After all, they're just answering a demand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    heading to BC tomorrow night for the weekend. Only Valemount, but still BC.
    Planning to go to bc again the first week of July. Thinking maybe bcers are not caring for albertans right now. I bought an old camaro to match mine I have sitting at the farm. Maybe make one out of two. It had bc plates on it. Maybe I should take them along. I could go incognito. ��
    I have a BC flag sticker on the back of the 4Runner for trips to BC. Let them know I'm one of the friendlies despite the red plate

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    Like Americans putting Canadian flags on their backpacks while hiking through Europe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kkozoriz View Post
    Like Americans putting Canadian flags on their backpacks while hiking through Europe.
    Kind-of feels that way lol. Although I am a British Columbian living in Alberta so It's not like I'm falsely representing myself!

    The S.O. on the other hand is born & raised Edmontonian so he's definitely faking it

  30. #530

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    Quote Originally Posted by kkozoriz View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    As if hydro developments don’t cause massive environmental destruction.

    The use and abuse of air conditioning - The Globe and Mail

    “VICTORIA, BC: AUGUST 6, 2008 - ...the host at a "Cooling Party" organized by the B.C. Sierra Club in Victoria, feels a bit guilty about running an environmental footprint-enhancing air conditioner in her home during the party. Cooling Parties were created to help British Columbians tackle global warming in their homes and neighbourhoods, by providing information and how to reduce household greenhouse gas emissions and conserve energy.”

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opin...article585356/



    “BC Hydro data shows the number of B.C. households using air conditioning has more than tripled in the last 16 years, from just 10% of homes in 2001, to 34% in 2017. BC Hydro is predicting this trend will continue to grow as dry, hot summers become the new norm for B.C. – leading to higher electricity costs and record-breaking power demand in the summer months.”

    https://www.bchydro.com/content/dam/...-july-2018.pdf
    Well since air conditioners run on electricity and BC's hydro electric system is still far cleaner and produces much less emissions than Alberta's then I guess it's not really an issue. The article you posted (which was originally written in 2011 and updated in 2018 ) doesn't really even mention BC except for the little paragraph at the front, which you copied to your post. Seems on par with all the little games you like to play KC
    The idea that hydro is environmentally friendly is ludicrous. The idea that just because it’s hydro generated power that ever more electricity can be used is ludicrous.

    What do you think demand growth does? What do you think flooding ever more valleys does?

    Hydro development obliterates ecosystems. But that’s ok compared to the risk from pipelines which might lead to oil spills in the sensitive river and ocean ecosystems? By analogy would it be ok to clear cut and strip mine vast areas of Jasper National Park as long as say construction of a coal fired generating plant in it was prevented?

    The singular focus on CO2 emissions and climate change while ignoring other critical and possibly more near term environmental risks is bizarre. Climate change is only one of many environmental issues we face.

    Avoiding emissions are also not a primary issue to the BC pipeline issue. If they were maybe they’d halt the massive exports of coal the ship out.

    The resistance has been over oil spills, land rights, consultation, tanker traffic...

    The growth in the use of A/C though highlights the demand side of the environmental issues. It’s a farce to cast Alberta, the producer, as being the evil party while the actual consumers continue to increase their demands for energy no matter the source.

    Say they decided to run their a/c off solar. Solar isn’t free energy. Solar too will cause massive environmental destruction from the input mining through to the possible clearing of vast swaths of land for solar electricity factories.
    Yeah, we'd never do anything like that here.



    And as far as this:

    It’s a farce to cast Alberta, the producer, as being the evil party while the actual consumers continue to increase their demands for energy no matter the source.
    I guess it's a farce to cast drug dealers as the evil party too then. After all, they're just answering a demand.
    Good counterpoint on the drug dealers.


    Oh, look. What a coincidence.
    Today’s news:



    CRIME
    June 12, 2019 11:58 am EST Updated: June 12, 2019 4:05 pm EST

    Over $2M in drugs, cash seized after drug ‘pipeline’ disrupted: ALERT

    630CHED, By Kirby Bourne

    “ALERT believes a high volume of drugs were being shipped from B.C. to Alberta using a “complex scheme” that utilized vehicles with hidden compartments to Edmonton and Calgary, with other distribution points across Alberta.”


    “An estimated $1.5 million worth of drugs were seized. Cash and vehicles were also seized.

    9.3 kilograms of cocaine
    17.2 kilograms of a cocaine buffing agent
    6.0 kilograms of methamphetamine
    684 grams of fentanyl powder
    $514,335 cash
    a handgun with suppressor and expanded magazine
    5 vehicles with hidden compartments
    ALERT couldn’t speculate how many shipments the organization had sent from B.C. to Alberta, Staff Sgt. Carson Creaser could only say they believed there were many loads.

    “Our allegation is that this is one shipment that we interdicted that formed the basis of our charges, however this was a scheme that was ongoing over a period of time,” he said. “The volume of drugs that was shipped into our provinces and our communities was substantially more.”


    https://globalnews.ca/news/5381573/a...bc-drug-trade/


    Maybe we need to restrict road traffic between BC and Alberta as its spilling addiction, death and potential violence into Alberta. It’s not a demand issue but a supply issue.
    Last edited by KC; 12-06-2019 at 04:26 PM.

  31. #531

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    Large hydropower dams 'not sustainable' in the developing world
    By Matt McGrath Environment correspondent 05 November 2018 Science & Environment

    Excerpts:

    A new study says that many large-scale hydropower projects in Europe and the US have been disastrous for the environment.


    More than 90% of dams built since the 1930s were more expensive than anticipated. They have damaged river ecology, displaced millions of people and have contributed to climate change by releasing greenhouse gases from the decomposition of flooded lands and forests.

    "They make a rosy picture of the benefits, which are not fulfilled and the costs are ignored and passed on to society much later," lead author Prof Emilio Moran, from Michigan State University, told BBC News.

    “The report points our that the large installations on these great rivers will destroy food sources, with 60 million people who live off the fisheries along the Mekong likely to be impacted with potential loss of livelihoods greater than $2bn. The authors also believe that dams will destroy thousands of species in these biodiversity hotspots.”

    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-46098118
    Last edited by KC; 12-06-2019 at 10:22 PM.

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    ^ Totally irrelevant to BC. Nice try.

  33. #533

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    hydropower is irrelevant to BC? How so? This has been quite the controversy https://www.sitecproject.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    hydropower is irrelevant to BC? How so? This has been quite the controversy https://www.sitecproject.com/
    The information in the article is irrelevant to BC

    Site C is controversial yet necessary.

    Consider all the other hydro dams in BC. Still far cleaner, more efficient, longer use of infrastructure and much less polluting than Alberta's dirty energy

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...itish_Columbia

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    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    hydropower is irrelevant to BC? How so? This has been quite the controversy https://www.sitecproject.com/
    The information in the article is irrelevant to BC

    Site C is controversial yet necessary.

    Consider all the other hydro dams in BC. Still far cleaner, more efficient, longer use of infrastructure and much less polluting than Alberta's dirty energy

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...itish_Columbia
    Yet you will still need to burn hydrocarbons to build the dam. You need to make cement, use heavy equipment to ready the land, and build the actual dam. How long after the dam has been built does it need to produce clean energy before it’s back to zero carbon emissions?

  36. #536
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    Quote Originally Posted by GranaryMan View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    hydropower is irrelevant to BC? How so? This has been quite the controversy https://www.sitecproject.com/
    The information in the article is irrelevant to BC

    Site C is controversial yet necessary.

    Consider all the other hydro dams in BC. Still far cleaner, more efficient, longer use of infrastructure and much less polluting than Alberta's dirty energy

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...itish_Columbia
    Yet you will still need to burn hydrocarbons to build the dam. You need to make cement, use heavy equipment to ready the land, and build the actual dam. How long after the dam has been built does it need to produce clean energy before it’s back to zero carbon emissions?
    Well sure, Building anything takes energy. Batteries for electric cars for instance are energy intensive to produce and recycle. But studies still show that over the lifecycle of the vehicle it will consume less energy than and ICE powered car despite the extra energy to produce the batteries.

    If you look at the list of BC hydroelectric generators you'll note a very significant number of them are 50+ years old, and some are even over 100 years old. Comparatively, look at the list of power plants in Alberta and how old they are. Some of the oldest (and by virtue of that the most efficient use of existing infrastructure by amortizing it's energy intensity to build over the time it is in operation) power generators in Alberta are hydro electric facilities. It's too bad there's so few. But the landscape of the vast majority of Alberta doesn't lend itself to that without massive flooding. The hydro dam on Kootenay River at Bonnington which is owned by Nelson Hydro is about 115 years old, it's a run of river dam so required practically no flooding, it generates over half of the power required in the Nelson region and is still running like a top to this day. I toured the dam a number of years ago and it's a neat little facility. The dam, owned by the city of Nelson allows the city to boast a very clean and reliable source of electricity, gives the city a high level of energy security and provides revenue back to the city which has allowed the city to invest in some quality infrastructure which gives residents of the area a high quality of life. Quite the win-win.
    Last edited by 240GLT; 13-06-2019 at 09:42 AM.

  37. #537
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    Watching on the news the houseboat industry going under at Sicamous. The mayor said the economy in Alberta and stalling of pipelines is starting to effect the smaller town businesses and economies in BC. Nothing like a good old NDP government to fudge everything up.
    Last edited by Drumbones; 13-06-2019 at 09:44 AM.

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    ^ Actually it was primarily due to a massive flood in 2012 and the company couldn't get back up on their feet and went into receivership. But continue to believe what you want LOL.

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...ship-1.5172125

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    I believe the mayor of the town. They likely would have weathered the storm had not the economy, especially Calgary’s, not tanked.
    Last edited by Drumbones; 13-06-2019 at 09:54 AM.

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    ^ because it suits your narrative of course. Nothing wrong with that.

    In other news gas in Vancouver has dropped almost 30 cents in the past few weeks. Thanks Jason Kenney!

  41. #541

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    ^^^But if the damn Dippers didn't destroy the economy by tanking the global price of oil hardworkin' Albertans could have helped keep them going!
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  42. #542

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    Didn't you know? The damn dippers controlled the price of oil before they even got in power. Thank godness Cheeseburger Kenney & Used Car Party is in power now. He'll really set those world oil prices! And bring back all the jobs lost to automation, because he's all about turning back time to yesteryear with abortion and womens rights, and LBGQ rights, coal power, and ending this fad called climate change.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    ^ because it suits your narrative of course. Nothing wrong with that.

    In other news gas in Vancouver has dropped almost 30 cents in the past few weeks. Thanks Jason Kenney!
    Proof good things happen when you get rid of an unnecessary tax. Maybe BC should follow suit and drop prices more, on everything. Likely has to do with their importing more from the USA again though. Refinery back up in Washington state or a pipeline completed from Washington. I know they were constructing another one.
    Last edited by Drumbones; 13-06-2019 at 10:11 AM.

  44. #544

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    I believe the mayor of the town.
    I believe the company.

    As many of you will be aware, Waterway has been a part of the fabric this community for over 50 years. As you may also be aware, Waterway suffered a devastating Flood in 2012, and since that time, the Waterway team has done an exceptional job in a very difficult situation, keeping the company operating and even growing. We celebrated our 50th anniversary last year with a sense of optimism and pride in what we had accomplished. The devastating flood that occurred in 2012 put us on our heels but with the help of very able legal counsel we pursued an action in damages against the Province, the District of Sicamous and the neigbouring landowners whose bridge was instrumental in damaging our property. After a 61 day trial, the BC Supreme Court issued its judgment on April 16, 2019. While we won every factual aspect of the of the case related to the flood, the Court did not side with us on damages. We had been anticipating a substantial monetary award that would make us whole. Our able counsel was also optimistic that this would be the case. Sadly the actual award of damages is several million dollars less than we had expected.
    They had put all their eggs in one basket, the successful outcome of their court case & foisting their losses entirely onto the taxpayer. This didn't occur & now they've got to pay the piper.

    https://www.waterwayhouseboats.com/
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  45. #545

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    Proof good things happen when you get rid of an unnecessary tax.
    What unnecessary tax was gotten rid of in the Lower Mainland?
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

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    ^^ Ya I just watched Global news, didn’t read up on it.
    Last edited by Drumbones; 13-06-2019 at 10:19 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by noodle View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    Proof good things happen when you get rid of an unnecessary tax.
    What unnecessary tax was gotten rid of in the Lower Mainland?
    Tax in Alberta affects prices of fuel headed that way I’m sure

  48. #548

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    You're sure about that?

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    I ain’t sure of much except that you are a dork. lol

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    Tax in Alberta affects prices of fuel headed that way I’m sure
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

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    Ok, I’ll opt out of the conversation.

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    Tourism in BC always suffers when the Alberta economy tanks. That seems to happen fairly regularly since Alberta is almost solely reliant on a single resource with a highly volatile price. Albertans do make up a sizeable chunk of the tourist population.

    There are other factors though, such a the floods in the Okanagan & Shuswap regions a few years ago that kept people off the beaches and lakes, and of course the past few years have seen brutal smoke conditions due to forest fires.

  53. #553

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    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by GranaryMan View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    hydropower is irrelevant to BC? How so? This has been quite the controversy https://www.sitecproject.com/
    The information in the article is irrelevant to BC

    Site C is controversial yet necessary.

    Consider all the other hydro dams in BC. Still far cleaner, more efficient, longer use of infrastructure and much less polluting than Alberta's dirty energy

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...itish_Columbia
    Yet you will still need to burn hydrocarbons to build the dam. You need to make cement, use heavy equipment to ready the land, and build the actual dam. How long after the dam has been built does it need to produce clean energy before it’s back to zero carbon emissions?
    Well sure, Building anything takes energy. Batteries for electric cars for instance are energy intensive to produce and recycle. But studies still show that over the lifecycle of the vehicle it will consume less energy than and ICE powered car despite the extra energy to produce the batteries.

    If you look at the list of BC hydroelectric generators you'll note a very significant number of them are 50+ years old, and some are even over 100 years old. Comparatively, look at the list of power plants in Alberta and how old they are. Some of the oldest (and by virtue of that the most efficient use of existing infrastructure by amortizing it's energy intensity to build over the time it is in operation) power generators in Alberta are hydro electric facilities. It's too bad there's so few. But the landscape of the vast majority of Alberta doesn't lend itself to that without massive flooding. The hydro dam on Kootenay River at Bonnington which is owned by Nelson Hydro is about 115 years old, it's a run of river dam so required practically no flooding, it generates over half of the power required in the Nelson region and is still running like a top to this day. I toured the dam a number of years ago and it's a neat little facility. The dam, owned by the city of Nelson allows the city to boast a very clean and reliable source of electricity, gives the city a high level of energy security and provides revenue back to the city which has allowed the city to invest in some quality infrastructure which gives residents of the area a high quality of life. Quite the win-win.

    Something like 80% of BC’s power comes from reservoir dams. Upstream ecosystems are buried under hundreds of feet of water and downstream ecosystems are deprived of various sustaining factors. In other words the stream and lake bed ecosystems are severely damaged, starved of oxygen etc and vast land based acreage /hectares and ecosystems within them are permanently altered. (In many ways not much different than Ft. McMurray except a dam and reservoir looks innocuous. )

    So, if everything is viewed solely through the lens of how much air pollution something generates, sure dams look wonderful. However that’s not how actual environmental impacts should be viewed.


    On lifespans: coal plants had about 80 yr lifespan.

    Hydro can be nice but it sure shouldn’t be viewed as good for the environment. Maybe better in many ways than coal or natural gas but consider where many of the most unique and sensitive ecosystems exit. Often in valley systems.

    Moreover consider the different historic land requirements; hydro destroyed vast acreage while often fossil fuel extraction was minimally destructive as it was pulled out via small holes in the ground (coal mines and wells). Oil sands and coal strip mining though are massively destructive like hydro. Coal mining likely even more so in BC vs Alberta.





    Megadams Not Clean or Green, Says Expert | The Tyee

    ‘When you add the emissions from building and producing materials for a dam, as well as the emissions from clearing forests and moving earth, the greenhouse gas production from hydro is expected to be about the same as from burning natural gas,’ says professor David Schindler. Photo from BC Hydro.

    Politicians who describe dams as “clean energy projects” are talking “nonsense” and rejecting decades of science,
    says David Schindler, a leading water ecologist.

    Former premier Christy Clark often touted the Site C dam as a “clean energy project” and Premier John Horgan has adopted the same term.

    But that’s not the story told by science, Schindler told The Tyee in a wide-ranging interview.

    In fact studies done by federal scientists identified dams as technological giants with lasting ecological footprints almost 40 years ago, he said.”...




    “One federal plan, the Mid-Century Long-Term Low-Greenhouse Gas Development Strategy, includes scenarios that would see the equivalent of another 118 Site C dams built across Canada by 2050, many on Indigenous land in northern Canada.

    But to call dams “non-greenhouse gas emitting” sources of power, as the Canadian government now does, is completely dishonest, said Schindler.

    Dams create greenhouse gas emissions by flooding soils and vegetation, which then decompose and release methane and carbon dioxide over time.

    The same microbial decomposition also helps to accelerate the production and bioaccumulation of mercury in fish and eaters of fish. “...


    https://thetyee.ca/News/2018/01/24/M...t-Clean-Green/

    Last edited by KC; 13-06-2019 at 05:20 PM.

  54. #554

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    Canada as a whole (and Ontario in particular) has made progress in reducing the carbon intensity of its electricity production. However, Alberta and Saskatchewan lag far, far behind.

    Source: https://www.nationalobserver.com/201...ss-electricity

  55. #555

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    I'm loving the biblical defense of climate change inaction being tossed about by KC: "Let the provinces with zero emissions cast the first stone"

    If I didn't know better, I'd assume this & the "how do we keep Albertans from treating Alberta the same way corporations do" thread are sarcasm, but I've got 10+ years experience in lowering my expectations of people here, so I do know better.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  56. #556
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    Quote Originally Posted by noodle View Post
    I'm loving the biblical defense of climate change inaction being tossed about by KC: "Let the provinces with zero emissions cast the first stone"

    If I didn't know better, I'd assume this & the "how do we keep Albertans from treating Alberta the same way corporations do" thread are sarcasm, but I've got 10+ years experience in lowering my expectations of people here, so I do know better.
    Keeping your expectations low is definitely key to living in Edmonton, no doubt. Somehow, even with low expectations the city still manages to disappoint

    KC, I do admire your tenacity and your modus operandi of essentially throwing sh*t at the wall to see if it'll stick. One day maybe it will work out for you pard'ner. One day.

    Quoting the Tyee ? I consider myself a progressive & even I know that certain media outlets should be taken with a grain of salt. Sometimes more of a salt block.

    Everything we do as humans has some sort of implication. No one is arguing that hydro has zero effect on the environment. But it's pretty clear to anyone except the most staunch and blinded partisan that BC's electrical system is far cleaner, more environmentally friendly and less impactful than Alberta's dirty energy sources. In BC right now probably the most impactful electrical systems are the off grid diesel generators that power remote communities. But even those are few & far between and the province has been working to tie those communities into the grid.

  57. #557

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    An extra irony is that Alberta consumes so much power currently that we import power from BC, so the more aspersions cast on BC's power cleanliness actually reflect on us as well, what with us being the demand that those dirty, dirty, dirty dams are filling & all.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  58. #558

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    Maybe Kenney should cut off electricity imports from BC at the same time he closes the taps on the pipelines. That'll show 'em, won't it?

  59. #559

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    Quote Originally Posted by kkozoriz View Post
    Maybe Kenney should cut off electricity imports from BC at the same time he closes the taps on the pipelines. That'll show 'em, won't it?
    An east-west power grid, Canada's elusive national dream
    February 14, 2016
    https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/eas...erta-1.3444318




    OPINION: Alberta Is Angry With British Columbia, And It’s Going To Cost This Province
    By Mark MacDonald, 21 May 2019

    Jason Kenney is the new Premier in Alberta, and things are about to get very interesting here in British Columbia.

    When...”

    https://businessexaminer.ca/vancouve...-this-province


    You’re all hypocrites: Why it’s a colossal cop-out to keep blaming Canada’s sky high emissions on Alberta

    https://nationalpost.com/news/canada...ons-on-alberta
    Last edited by KC; 14-06-2019 at 06:12 PM.

  60. #560

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    Smyth: Pipeline reality check — bitumen is being shipped through B.C. already | The Province

    https://theprovince.com/news/bc-poli...gh-b-c-already

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