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Thread: Downtown Dining Week 2018 - March 9-18

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    Default Downtown Dining Week 2018 - March 9-18

    Welcome to Downtown Dining Week

    March 9 - 18, 2018

    We have a record 37 restaurants participating this year.

    Menus and additional information can be found at:

    http://www.edmontondowntown.com/dining-week/
    www.decl.org

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    The Marc & Tzin booked so far.
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    Reminder - Downtown Dining Week is on until the 18th!

    http://www.edmontondowntown.com/dining-week/
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    Tonight was #DTDWyeg @themarc

    Potato and Parsnip Soup-with toasted hazelnuts

    House-Made Garlic Sausage-savoy cabbage & wild boar bacon, potato pancake, smoked cheddar cream sauce, stout mustard

    Breton Cake-with apricot coulis & Chantilly cream sauce


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  5. #5

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    ^This deserves criticism.

    Wild boar bacon?

    Boars are an invasive species in Alberta. There have been attempts to eradicate this animal from Alberta for decades and including bounties. This has been largely unsuccessful and now not continued as the cull has been poor. The animals are pretty good at escaping and evading. So that the meat on the plate is almost certainly not cull sourced. Instead it would come from one of the farms that raise wild boar and with these operations being the reason we have a wild boar invasive presence in the province in the first place. (because boars escaping from such operations is the only reason we have wild boars in this province)

    This animal is an invasive pest. Does massive destruction to natural environments though its foraging and with its tendency to dig out roots and whole plants. Also they often steal food from cattle operations and where they are excessive nuisances. Being omnivores they also eat a lot of bird eggs and are a threat to bird populations.

    So that the actions of perpetuating this industry in Alberta by putting it on the plate and consuming it is supporting the growth of the invasive species in Alberta. This is not cute consumer behavior. Putting it on a plate does not get rid of the destructive problem these animals create. It just means that more operations, or greater numbers of wild boar will be raised, and with the wild population again increasing and doing damage.

    http://www.rcinet.ca/en/2017/11/15/w...al-trainwreck/

    The introduction is one of the more irresponsible acts that has occurred in Western Provinces and these animals have been insidious and a huge problem wherever they are introduced. Add that invasive species have no natural predators.
    Last edited by Replacement; 13-03-2018 at 06:20 AM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    ^This deserves criticism.

    Wild boar bacon?

    Boars are an invasive species in Alberta. There have been attempts to eradicate this animal from Alberta for decades and including bounties. This has been largely unsuccessful and now not continued as the cull has been poor. The animals are pretty good at escaping and evading. So that the meat on the plate is almost certainly not cull sourced. Instead it would come from one of the farms that raise wild boar and with these operations being the reason we have a wild boar invasive presence in the province in the first place. (because boars escaping from such operations is the only reason we have wild boars in this province)

    This animal is an invasive pest. Does massive destruction to natural environments though its foraging and with its tendency to dig out roots and whole plants. Also they often steal food from cattle operations and where they are excessive nuisances. Being omnivores they also eat a lot of bird eggs and are a threat to bird populations.

    So that the actions of perpetuating this industry in Alberta by putting it on the plate and consuming it is supporting the growth of the invasive species in Alberta. This is not cute consumer behavior. Putting it on a plate does not get rid of the destructive problem these animals create. It just means that more operations, or greater numbers of wild boar will be raised, and with the wild population again increasing and doing damage.

    http://www.rcinet.ca/en/2017/11/15/w...al-trainwreck/

    The introduction is one of the more irresponsible acts that has occurred in Western Provinces and these animals have been insidious and a huge problem wherever they are introduced. Add that invasive species have no natural predators.
    You’ve started with an assumption.

    Running with it however: maybe farm bred is a necessary first step to introducing it to the local market. Expand demand and soon they start getting taken out by hunters able to sell the meat.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    ^This deserves criticism.

    Wild boar bacon?

    Boars are an invasive species in Alberta. There have been attempts to eradicate this animal from Alberta for decades and including bounties. This has been largely unsuccessful and now not continued as the cull has been poor. The animals are pretty good at escaping and evading. So that the meat on the plate is almost certainly not cull sourced. Instead it would come from one of the farms that raise wild boar and with these operations being the reason we have a wild boar invasive presence in the province in the first place. (because boars escaping from such operations is the only reason we have wild boars in this province)

    This animal is an invasive pest. Does massive destruction to natural environments though its foraging and with its tendency to dig out roots and whole plants. Also they often steal food from cattle operations and where they are excessive nuisances. Being omnivores they also eat a lot of bird eggs and are a threat to bird populations.

    So that the actions of perpetuating this industry in Alberta by putting it on the plate and consuming it is supporting the growth of the invasive species in Alberta. This is not cute consumer behavior. Putting it on a plate does not get rid of the destructive problem these animals create. It just means that more operations, or greater numbers of wild boar will be raised, and with the wild population again increasing and doing damage.

    http://www.rcinet.ca/en/2017/11/15/w...al-trainwreck/

    The introduction is one of the more irresponsible acts that has occurred in Western Provinces and these animals have been insidious and a huge problem wherever they are introduced. Add that invasive species have no natural predators.
    You’ve started with an assumption.

    Running with it however: maybe farm bred is a necessary first step to introducing it to the local market. Expand demand and soon they start getting taken out by hunters able to sell the meat.
    What assumption have I started with? I have researched this. My opinions are not my own. These opinions expressed would be had by anybody that has the concern about the invasive species. Nor am I assuming that the Wild boar farms are at fault. This has been confirmed in jurisdictions where they exist. You could basically plot out where wild boar populations exist in the wild in Alberta and Saskatchewan and where the operations exist(ed). With some in Saskatchewan simply releasing all their animals due to the operations not being commercially feasible.

    In anycase WHY would we want to be introducing an invasive species to the local market. It shouldn't be in the local market and the animals shouldn't exist here.

    The ONLY assumption made is that The Marc are running with a WC provider but given wild boar farms exist locally, and that those operations claim to specifically cater to local restaurants its a fair bet these are Alberta or Saskatchewan sourced animals and in anycase large probability the meat comes from provinces where these are considered invasive species.

    So this endeavor should not be commercially supported in any way.

    ps I do recall past discussions with you regarding invasive species where you wanted to grow plants that were invasive, despite being told that they were invasive and that ideally you should not. So I am wondering whether you fully understand concerns re; invasive species in general and why jurisdictions have ample concerns about introduction. My apology in advance if I confused you with any other poster or if I've misrepresented anything in the latter.
    Last edited by Replacement; 13-03-2018 at 06:49 AM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

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    Okonomoyaki at Wishbone!


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    Nick Lees: Sampled some of everything on offer at Downtown Dining Week media tasting

    EDMONTON JOURNAL

    Not being a foodie unless asked for my professional Scot’s opinion on how to prepare a just-trapped haggis, I was out of my depth last week when invited to the Downtown Dining Week media launch

    Organized for 15 years by the Downtown Business Association (DBA) to shine a light on the wide variety of culinary expertise in the downtown area, the event being held March 9-18 has attracted a record 37 restaurants.

    Surrounded by chefs and young would-be journalists busy tweeting, I wondered the best way to cover the event. The portions weren’t massive and there were only about a dozen restaurants represented. So I sampled everything.

    My taste buds were overwhelmed by a multitude of stunning flavours and I was forced to seek guidance from Katherine Hoy, the association’s marketing and communications manager.


    “Participating restaurants are offering a set lunch for $18 and dinners for $30 or $45,” she said.

    And making waves was Madison Grill chef Trevor Johnson’s dinner starter, mushroom arancini with a leek-cream and red-wine reduction.

    “All chefs were requested to bring 50 servings of their dishes,” said Hoy. “Trevor brought about twice that and all were snapped up.”

    http://edmontonjournal.com/opinion/c...-media-tasting
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanO View Post
    Tonight was #DTDWyeg @themarc

    Potato and Parsnip Soup-with toasted hazelnuts

    House-Made Garlic Sausage-savoy cabbage & wild boar bacon, potato pancake, smoked cheddar cream sauce, stout mustard

    Breton Cake-with apricot coulis & Chantilly cream sauce


    www.twitter.com/ianoyeg




    Interesting.

    And what was the wine pairing may Top_Dawg ask ?

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    A Bordeaux.
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  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    ^This deserves criticism.

    Wild boar bacon?

    Boars are an invasive species in Alberta. There have been attempts to eradicate this animal from Alberta for decades and including bounties. This has been largely unsuccessful and now not continued as the cull has been poor. The animals are pretty good at escaping and evading. So that the meat on the plate is almost certainly not cull sourced. Instead it would come from one of the farms that raise wild boar and with these operations being the reason we have a wild boar invasive presence in the province in the first place. (because boars escaping from such operations is the only reason we have wild boars in this province)

    This animal is an invasive pest. Does massive destruction to natural environments though its foraging and with its tendency to dig out roots and whole plants. Also they often steal food from cattle operations and where they are excessive nuisances. Being omnivores they also eat a lot of bird eggs and are a threat to bird populations.

    So that the actions of perpetuating this industry in Alberta by putting it on the plate and consuming it is supporting the growth of the invasive species in Alberta. This is not cute consumer behavior. Putting it on a plate does not get rid of the destructive problem these animals create. It just means that more operations, or greater numbers of wild boar will be raised, and with the wild population again increasing and doing damage.

    http://www.rcinet.ca/en/2017/11/15/w...al-trainwreck/

    The introduction is one of the more irresponsible acts that has occurred in Western Provinces and these animals have been insidious and a huge problem wherever they are introduced. Add that invasive species have no natural predators.
    You’ve started with an assumption.

    Running with it however: maybe farm bred is a necessary first step to introducing it to the local market. Expand demand and soon they start getting taken out by hunters able to sell the meat.
    What assumption have I started with? I have researched this. My opinions are not my own. These opinions expressed would be had by anybody that has the concern about the invasive species. Nor am I assuming that the Wild boar farms are at fault. This has been confirmed in jurisdictions where they exist. You could basically plot out where wild boar populations exist in the wild in Alberta and Saskatchewan and where the operations exist(ed). With some in Saskatchewan simply releasing all their animals due to the operations not being commercially feasible.

    In anycase WHY would we want to be introducing an invasive species to the local market. It shouldn't be in the local market and the animals shouldn't exist here.

    The ONLY assumption made is that The Marc are running with a WC provider but given wild boar farms exist locally, and that those operations claim to specifically cater to local restaurants its a fair bet these are Alberta or Saskatchewan sourced animals and in anycase large probability the meat comes from provinces where these are considered invasive species.

    So this endeavor should not be commercially supported in any way.

    ps I do recall past discussions with you regarding invasive species where you wanted to grow plants that were invasive, despite being told that they were invasive and that ideally you should not. So I am wondering whether you fully understand concerns re; invasive species in general and why jurisdictions have ample concerns about introduction. My apology in advance if I confused you with any other poster or if I've misrepresented anything in the latter.
    “So that the meat on the plate is almost certainly not cull sourced.” This is what I saw as an assumption.


    On my position on introducing species, again I think you’ve made assumptions or you’re reading has been selective. My view is that we need to consider invasive species only which will help in the future. Otherwise non-invasive would be better. Nonetheless if man-made global warming is real, then the environment IS going to change, and it WILL change at a high non-natural rate. Therefore it seems logical that we may need to think about man-made interventions to speed transitions to a coming environment. That or face extirpation of current native species and possible replacement with desert or denuded eroding landscapes. Current climate science is saying that global warming is real, it is happening, it will continue to happen, it is irreversible, it will cause global change. To deny a highly probable reality and not study and forecast the local impacts and consider responses to avoid environmental calamity seems irresponsible towards future generations.

    Moreover, throughout large parts of North America past semi-nomadic indigenous people planted things like oaks etc to be able to harvest them in the future. What is seen today as native species were sometimes introduced by man long ago. And speaking of oaks, in our own river valley park system the City has planted burr oaks throughout the bush. I also see mountain ash spreading throughout the parks. (Such introductions may provide added food sources for current native wildlife.) In fact we have vast numbers of non-native plantings going on all around Alberta.

    I also have around 2/3 of a mile of lake frontage with a creek that is ‘naturalizing’ and am fully aware of the huge risks and damage non-native, undesirable, introductions can reap on an ecosystem. Hence we haven’t planted such things as wildflower seed mixes out of a risk of introducing purple loosestrife. I was raised with a high degree of awareness towards the environment. That said, I have planted non-native trees and shrubs on the property including Jack Pine sourced from a natural/native source about 20 miles away, provincial shelter-belt program trees (including spruce, pine, poplar, caragana, oak, etc).

    We also now have 8 beaver dams on the property and while upstream the landowners are blasting the dams and trapping or shooting the beavers, I spent nearly $2,000 on materials last year, raised our bridge and installed a DIY beaver dam leveling device. I highly doubt that there are many people actually willing to put out serious cash and effort to protect the environment. Most people are just all talk and no action.



    Invasive species for dinner? Restaurant serves up Florida's most reviled breeds | Life and style | The Guardian

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...recipe-florida


    Eat The Invaders — Fighting Invasive Species, One Bite At A Time!

    http://eattheinvaders.org/


    Eat an Invasive Species at Your Next Meal | Travel | Smithsonian

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/trave...try-180957899/
    Last edited by KC; 13-03-2018 at 10:09 AM.

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    Very well played.

    Ideally Top_Dawg would have opted for a 2012 Chateau La Croix St. Georges.

    Pairs very well with both pork and cheddar.



    Magnifique !

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    Albacore Tuna Crudo - Irvings Farm fresh bacon, onion relish, togarashi

    Wild Boar and Black Garlic Meatballs - Jack Daniels glaze

    Braised Alberta Beef Brisket and Gnocchi Tartiflette - Winding Road RDB cheese and leek cream


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    TARTIFLETTE ??


    Non.

    C'est pas possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Top_Dawg View Post


    Very well played.

    Ideally Top_Dawg would have opted for a 2012 Chateau La Croix St. Georges.

    Pairs very well with both pork and cheddar.



    Magnifique !

    What parallel universe have I awoken to ....
    ... gobsmacked

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