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Thread: Are some driving fines way too low?

  1. #1

    Default Are some driving fines way too low?

    I see a few headlines on this collision using words like outrage. So are such fines way too low to be effective as deterrents?


    “Outrage over truck driver's fine for hitting motorcyclist
    A truck driver in Manitoba, Canada, was ticketed with distracted driving and failing to stop at a red light after colliding with a motorcyclist. Some say the C$406 ($315; 232) fine was not a steep enough penalty.“

    http://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-us-...g-motorcyclist



    Global News investigation finds cycling fatalities often end with fine, no jail time for drivers - Winnipeg | Globalnews.ca
    https://globalnews.ca/news/3520368/g...e-for-drivers/

  2. #2

    Default

    In general, I think we should make every effort not to have strong opinions about such things. They are a terrible but unavoidable aspect of the real world.

    Maximally harsh penalties are only justifiable for political beliefs. Everything else is too complex for simple gut-driven vengeance.
    Last edited by AShetsen; 03-05-2018 at 09:39 PM.

  3. #3

    Default

    The thing is that the actual lapse that kills or injures often isn't so different than the little lapses that so many other drivers have every day, so it's hard to think that a massive punishment is appropriate, or that higher fines would have a significant impact.

    On the other hand, increasing standards of care for drivers is a very worthwhile goal.

    I would rather see much higher standards for drivers testing including regular re-testing, actual enforcement of vehicles safety (lifts, tints, windshields, lights and brakes) and more enforcement on the driving mistakes and poor judgement that doesn't kill, try to stop those bad drivers before they kill, not after.

    More and longer drivers license suspensions for all kinds if unsafe driving - and killing someone with your car should be enough proof of dangerous driving to warrant an automatic multi-year ban from driving.
    There can only be one.

  4. #4

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    I agree. Our standards for driver testing are too low. I believe that everyone should be road tested every 10 years and a half day of lectures on driving, changing laws and public safety. At that time, your driving record is reviewed and if for example you have a couple of distracted offences, you should have to take a half day course on the subject.

    I remember being in school and we were shown driver safety films, there was also a seatbelt information program where they showed accidents and collision tests with dummies flying through windshields over and over again to inform us about the merits of safety. They even brought a trailer that had a rolling seat and a ramp that simulated 20 mph crash.

    Do kids get any public safety lectures on the dangers of distracted driving these days?
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AShetsen View Post
    In general, I think we should make every effort not to have strong opinions about such things. They are a terrible but unavoidable aspect of the real world.

    Maximally harsh penalties are only justifiable for political beliefs. Everything else is too complex for simple gut-driven vengeance.
    Yeah agree on the vengeance thing. As I argued somewhere else on this forum, the very same error can have very different consequences due to other factors. People often want to penalize the random negative consequence coming out of the action but likely wouldn’t want to harshly penalize the same error where no one gets hurt.

  6. #6

    Default

    Fines after an accident don't bring back a life. Education and traffic enforcement prevent accidents.
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  7. #7

    Default

    Fines/legal consequences do tell victim's families that society takes it seriously. And while money is poor consolation for a loved one I wouldn't be totally opposed to ordering a fine with proceeds directed to the victim. The price of the vehicle with a $10,000 minimum would be reasonable.

    Larger fines for casualty collisions make more sense if in a scenario where better training and better general enforcement raise driving standards overall.
    There can only be one.

  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
    Our standards for driver testing are too low. I believe that everyone should be road tested every 10 years and a half day of lectures on driving, changing laws and public safety.
    Agreed.

    There's maybe some adjustment I would put on the frequency of re-testing, but this should absolutely be something that is mandatory. I tend to think that most everyone that drives is generally OK, but as people get older (myself included) there are behaviors that creep in that require adjustment. If there is literally no time to receive this additional feedback on how good of a driver you actually are, as scored by standardized criteria, there is no opportunity to correct. Expecting people to correct their bad habits themselves is foolish. Enforcement (automated or otherwise) catches and presumably corrects the behavior in some, however we are all prone to incorporating bad driving behavior over time and it's the responsible thing to do to establish a reasonable driving re-certification schedule.

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