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Thread: 'Second cities' becoming a first choice again - Let's get on it

  1. #1
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    Default 'Second cities' becoming a first choice again - Let's get on it

    Great read and critical for our city to take advantage of.

    https://www.curbed.com/2018/5/1/1730...ng-second-city
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    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

  2. #2
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    Neighbourhoods like Ritchie have a growing millennial base.
    "Talk minus action equals zero." - Joe Keithley, D. O. A.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by IanO View Post
    Great read and critical for our city to take advantage of.

    https://www.curbed.com/2018/5/1/1730...ng-second-city
    First, in Canada, thus does not apply to us as we are a major city. Something like this would be more akin to Saskatoon or Regina.

    Second, this trend has been going for quite a while. Many folks have made decissions to move away from major cities and areas of high taxes. Chicago is one of many big cities that is experiencing this trend right now.
    " The strength of a man is in the stride he walks."

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    ^actually it would.

    Tor/Van/MTL

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  5. #5

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    And we're pretty small potatoes in North America, #72 out of 79 with metro populations over 1 million.

    http://www.self.gutenberg.org/articl..._by_population

  6. #6

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    Its interesting to see this thread here on a board where some users, you as well Ian, have felt that cities have to do everything to attract young people and prevent them from leaving.

    I've always maintained two things are primarily important;

    1) Reasonable cost of living

    2)Employment opportunity.


    If you have that, there should be some interest in staying.

    All that seems to have occurred here is that Milennials found common sense and are now attracted to places with a good standard of living, reasonable cost of living, and job opportunity.

    Decades of pandering to build world class artifice on public spending , to attempt to compete with big cities seems less required.



    The article is very misleading as well. The narrative is that all the places millennials are moving back to have changed dramatically. I think a more realistic look is that Milennials chasing big city dreams often runs up to a wall of cold hard reality where they begin to realize that the places their parents chose to live were pretty reasonable places and MUCH more fiscally prudent locations. Those places haven't changed as much as the attitudes about living in them.

    That this article is being foisted as another reason cities should spend more to be appealing is disingenuous. If anything its an indication of a generation coming to its senses. Good for them. A lot of those people probably should have stayed. The ones that did are probably ahead not having had to spend NY or LA cost of living.
    Last edited by Replacement; 15-05-2018 at 09:15 AM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  7. #7

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    I'd argue Edmonton has changed dramatically in the last 10-15 years, in many ways. Many of my friends have left to other parts of the world and Canada for not just "big cities", but "more connected", "urban healthy" cities. Regard those items and what you or others you know personally want from a city, but many do want somethin that is more Toronto, but maybe more like Halifax or Ottawa. Edmonton has changed in many ways, and as these folks left in their 20's are now / would now consider moving back in their 30's to "make roots" or buy a home and what-not. This is a generation that can "move anywhere". Lots of cities have affordable housing to buy, but what will Edmonton ALSO sell/offer/provide to make these people stay/come back/move here for?

    Lots of folks that move to Vancouver move there for the more "quaint" well connected and walkable shopping streets and the amazing transit, and not the Yaletown or Coal Harbour experience. They also move there to live there, not to buy a 1.6 million dollar single detached house. Edmonton had an imbalance of what many would call "lifestyle" diversity/options or housing diversity / urban space diversity. Edmonton has really focused a lot of these areas in the last decade and it is making an impact. The city has adapted, changed, and with both a stronger urban environment, and a healthy economy and good housing market, it has a lot to offer. That's a good thing for everyone.
    Live and love... your neighbourhood.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by GenWhy? View Post
    I'd argue Edmonton has changed dramatically in the last 10-15 years, in many ways. ..
    Agreed and it will probably continue to change dramatically in the years and decades to come.

    But, it won't always be for the better. At a certain size big cities actually often lessen quality of life. They become overwhelming and a larger and larger percentage of their population compartamentalize their lives.

    They stay in the burbs - shop at Walmart, eat at insert_name_of_regional_or_national restaurant chain ... etc.

    For me, Vancouver is about perfect size - big enough for all the sports and entertainment franchises and touring shows, good air service - etc ...

    But not so big folks are intimidated into staying within their own community.

    All that said, I'll probably be dead before Edmonton reaches that size, so it's all about comment versus any reality I'll have to worry over.
    ... gobsmacked

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    For me it will about a 1.7-2mil person Edmonton/region with about 50k living Downtown.
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by McBoo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by GenWhy? View Post
    I'd argue Edmonton has changed dramatically in the last 10-15 years, in many ways. ..
    Agreed and it will probably continue to change dramatically in the years and decades to come.

    But, it won't always be for the better. At a certain size big cities actually often lessen quality of life. They become overwhelming and a larger and larger percentage of their population compartamentalize their lives.

    They stay in the burbs - shop at Walmart, eat at insert_name_of_regional_or_national restaurant chain ... etc.

    For me, Vancouver is about perfect size - big enough for all the sports and entertainment franchises and touring shows, good air service - etc ...

    But not so big folks are intimidated into staying within their own community.

    All that said, I'll probably be dead before Edmonton reaches that size, so it's all about comment versus any reality I'll have to worry over.
    You're I believe confusing status quo growth of two very different cities, and changing urban development / urban design principles that, with growth, can change a city as it evolves with higher density into the future. It's not about Edmonton becoming high density but diversity.
    Live and love... your neighbourhood.

  11. #11

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    Lets get on what? Is this some sort of stretch to hope to see our city's name on some list of cities as a weak attempt to boost our civic moral? Most of those lists are 'pay to play' type lists...

  12. #12

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    Get on what? We are already on it. Edmonton is changing regardless of what list someone references. It's an urban design, use, and format change.
    Live and love... your neighbourhood.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by GenWhy? View Post
    ... It's not about Edmonton becoming high density but diversity.
    Oh I think Edmonton already has diversity and as new Canadians settle in cities where they can access services they need - will become even more so. All for it too.
    ... gobsmacked

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by McBoo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by GenWhy? View Post
    ... It's not about Edmonton becoming high density but diversity.
    Oh I think Edmonton already has diversity and as new Canadians settle in cities where they can access services they need - will become even more so. All for it too.
    Not speaking of population, but the physicality of the city.
    Live and love... your neighbourhood.

  15. #15

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    ^I think I'm not the only one confused. You said more diversity. Not sure what you were meaning if not talking about pop demographics. All this livability stuff is generally nebulous anyway.

    What does diversity in the context you are using it mean?
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by GenWhy? View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by McBoo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by GenWhy? View Post
    I'd argue Edmonton has changed dramatically in the last 10-15 years, in many ways. ..
    Agreed and it will probably continue to change dramatically in the years and decades to come.

    But, it won't always be for the better. At a certain size big cities actually often lessen quality of life. They become overwhelming and a larger and larger percentage of their population compartamentalize their lives.

    They stay in the burbs - shop at Walmart, eat at insert_name_of_regional_or_national restaurant chain ... etc.

    For me, Vancouver is about perfect size - big enough for all the sports and entertainment franchises and touring shows, good air service - etc ...

    But not so big folks are intimidated into staying within their own community.

    All that said, I'll probably be dead before Edmonton reaches that size, so it's all about comment versus any reality I'll have to worry over.
    You're I believe confusing status quo growth of two very different cities, and changing urban development / urban design principles that, with growth, can change a city as it evolves with higher density into the future. It's not about Edmonton becoming high density but diversity.
    As per the conversation and quote.
    Live and love... your neighbourhood.

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