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Thread: Why Singapore is so clean

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    Default Why Singapore is so clean

    Why Singapore is so clean Capital

    BBC - Capital - The cost of keeping Singapore squeaky clean


    “Even the broader approach has analogues in the West. George Kelling and James Q Wilson wrote the famous essay Broken Windows in 1982, which argued that a broken window “is a signal that no one cares, and so breaking more windows costs nothing”. So the prescription was to address small infractions aggressively before they became major problems.”





    “Edward D’Silva is frustrated about the way the rise of this army of cleaners has changed the culture in Singapore. With so many cleaners, Singaporeans came to regard cleaning up as someone else’s job. ...”



    “...Simply put, he thinks Singaporeans have had it too easy for too long, and they need to change. Liak agrees.

    “The government cleans the apartment [building], right up to your corridor, typically twice a day. When you have a very efficient cleaning service, and your neighbour messes up the place, you don’t blame the neighbour, you blame the cleaner for not picking it up,” he says. ...”


    http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/201...-squeaky-clean
    Last edited by KC; 29-10-2018 at 01:19 AM.

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    Just off the top of my head, a couple of things. I imagine climate has something to do with it. No snow. Ergo, no dumping of tonnes of sand, grit, salt. That said, we should be seeing improvement with the calcium chloride now being used. Anyway, Edmonton's not so bad. I've seen a lot worse.

    Oh, and Singapore is much more diligent on these things, and much tougher on people who mess the place up.
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    10 Of The Dirtiest Cities To Avoid (And 10 Of The Cleanest Worth A Visit)

    https://www.thetravel.com/10-of-the-...worth-a-visit/



    Is Delhi the most polluted city on Earth? Not quite

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/d...-in-the-world/
    Last edited by KC; 29-10-2018 at 01:24 AM.

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    https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news...-clean-9112610

    ^

    recognizing that the cheap labour won’t always be available and that the human role needs to be made both easier and more rewarding (although others will surely argue that it eliminates jobs for people and shouldn’t be allowed ).
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    I've been to that city 3 times, so I would like to know , from your perspective, what you think about their core vs ours in terms of towers and density? This is a city of around 2.5 million to compare to ours.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctzn-Ed View Post
    I've been to that city 3 times, so I would like to know , from your perspective, what you think about their core vs ours in terms of towers and density? This is a city of around 2.5 million to compare to ours.
    i'm not sure in what manner you want me to make the comparison but on an overall level our core doesn't hold a candle to their core not only in terms of towers and densidy but in how it actually works and relates to the rest of the city.

    comparing cores alone however, probably does an injustice to both when you recognize that while singapore is a city, it is also country. as either, it's interesting to note that the physical area of both places is pretty similar (approximately 700 skm). they are an island and their connection to the water is a perimeter one that unites the city while ours is a central one that divides the city. their connections to the water are also much more accessible and well used than ours - it is a part of their daily lives whereas ours is pretty much incidental.

    as well as the physical differences in two cities of similar size, singapore - partly because she is a country and not just a city - is also outgoing and global and knows she has to compete on the global stage. edmonton is much more insular and inward looking and thinks to too large a degree that she has to be protected from the global stage (part of that being that edmonton is the creature of a provincial entity and both the city and the province live in a country that could pretty well not care less about us and probably couldn't work any harder to prove it).

    both cities are fairly inclusive of their minorities and both value education although we don't seem to value civil service careers nearly as much as they do. singaporeans also seem to have a much greater sense of self-worth and potential than most edmontonians although they can happily work themselves to death 6 or 7 days a week in a city where the only real hobby sometimes seems to be shopping.

    because utility costs are so high and living accommodations typically so small, people tend to eat out almost exclusively or shop daily for small portions consumed the same day. it makes the city much more vibrant and its inhabitants much less inhibited than here. automobiles are so expensive and licensing is so prohibitive that their mrt and their bus system and their network of taxis (and now uber) also contribute to their vibrancy as people aren't moving privately from garage to garage but move instead in public.

    not sure how the above "top of my head" impressions reconcile with yours after your visits but i'd be interested to know...
    Last edited by kcantor; 29-10-2018 at 05:33 PM.
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    No one's going to raise the fact that Singapore is a quasi-authoritarian, family-run state with severe criminal punishment for even petty crimes and significantly less personal freedoms than most other ostensibly "democratic" states? Caning people for graffiti and banning chewing gum might have something to do with why the place is clean.

    https://www.amnesty.org/en/countries...ort-singapore/

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    Singapore is also about 5.8 million so closer to Toronto size.

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    Also very important to Singapore's cleanliness, if not critical to it, the article said that there is significant expenditure on clean-up crews, to the extent that many in Singapore don't lean up after themselves because they've become so used to those crews doing it for them.
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    Tokyo is incredibly clean, and one of the interesting things I noticed was the almost total absence of garbage cans in public places. I was told that they don't have many because it's so ingrained in Japanese culture to take your waste home with you, that they're not needed. Meanwhile it seems like 10-20% of the population in Canada thinks it's kosher to throw garbage out the window of their vehicle on the Henday. Culture and attitudes have a big role in this kind of thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    No one's going to raise the fact that Singapore is a quasi-authoritarian, family-run state with severe criminal punishment for even petty crimes and significantly less personal freedoms than most other ostensibly "democratic" states? Caning people for graffiti and banning chewing gum might have something to do with why the place is clean.

    https://www.amnesty.org/en/countries...ort-singapore/
    despite the things you note, singapore rates pretty high in quality of life and many other measures (education/income/life span) etc. but you are correct, it could be classified as a quasi-authoritarian state although most singaporeans would describe it as living in a "managed democracy". most housing is state owned - although there is strong encouragement for those in it to purchase them - and there is a concerted effort to make it available to (a) all citizens and to make it available on a "mixed building" basis (i.e. there are no chinese or malay or indian buildings) so there are no real closed enclaves and that typically extends to playgrounds and schools as well. on balance, most singaporeans regardless of background or culture or wealth stay in singapore even though passports and travel documents are easy to obtain and, being a commonwealth country, pretty much accepted throughout the globe. perfect on all fronts? far from it i suppose. but for a country with only a 53 year history of independence and statehood it's made remarkable progress when you compare them with malaysia (with whom they were part of prior to independence) and most of the rest of southeast asia if not most of the world.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    Tokyo is incredibly clean, and one of the interesting things I noticed was the almost total absence of garbage cans in public places. I was told that they don't have many because it's so ingrained in Japanese culture to take your waste home with you, that they're not needed. Meanwhile it seems like 10-20% of the population in Canada thinks it's kosher to throw garbage out the window of their vehicle on the Henday. Culture and attitudes have a big role in this kind of thing.
    on the culture and attitude front, i think a large part of that stems from having a large degree of "private ownership of public spaces" or having a disconnect between one's own private spaces and public spaces. when you typically use public spaces on a regular basis instead of moving from private space to private space in a private vehicle your relationship to and your perception of those public spaces is different.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor
    despite the things you note, singapore rates pretty high in quality of life and many other measures (education/income/life span) etc.


    It also rates quite low on things like freedom of expression, press, and other civil liberties. China's human development scores have skyrocketed in the past 30 years. That doesn't mean it's any less of a dictatorship. The two systems of government of course are not very comparable, at least validly, but I do think that a lot of the "convergence" types in foreign policy over the last 30 years were pretty much hoping that China would turn in to Singapore as it developed. And that's not working out so great, with a new Great Leader For Life now in place and cracking down on dissent.

    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor
    it could be classified as a quasi-authoritarian state although most singaporeans would describe it as living in a "managed democracy".


    Yes, I'd come very close to using that terminology originally. On the one hand, it might be a bit more accurate. But on the other, I feel like it's also a bit of a euphemism.

    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor
    perfect on all fronts? far from it i suppose. but for a country with only a 53 year history of independence and statehood it's made remarkable progress when you compare them with malaysia (with whom they were part of prior to independence) and most of the rest of southeast asia if not most of the world.


    I agree that Singapore is a very well run country. But it's been pretty much the definition of a benign dictatorship since it's independence. Therefore, while it's one model of now a country can be developed, I don't think it's particularly realistic to expect that the model can be applied elsewhere given how unique Singapore is and how lucky they got with having a leader like Lee Kuan Yew instead of a more run of the mill President For Life.

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