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Thread: Foundations: code vs what works

  1. #1

    Default Foundations: code vs what works

    First, yes, I know that the building code rules. Period.

    However what are people experiences with foundations here? (Homes in the city, garages on pads, lake cottages on all kinds of different foundations, etc)

    Moreover I’ve read many posts and discussions on various cottage building forums and it’s always the same story: almost anything less than a full foundation means that your cottage/cabin will be a disaster. The experts pretty much always say don’t go skids. Don’t go block and beam, only deep piers will save you from a disaster. So this pretty much is in agreement with the building code here.

    However from my personal experience I don’t fully believe in that dogma.

    First of all, here full concrete basements are the standard. Yet cracking foundations are also known to happen. Two of my nearby neighbours have spent tens of thousands dealing with problems with their full foundations in recent years. So just how common are cracked foundations here in the city?

    My other experience is with our unheated seasonal cabins on blocks and beams. Largely positive experience, though it could be better. The experts though would have everyone believe anything on blocks or pads is destined to be bulldozed within just a few years.
    Last edited by KC; 24-05-2019 at 07:16 PM.

  2. #2
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    There were a couple infills that went up in idylwylde recently. They put in pressure treated foundations. I cannot understand why.
    They saved maybe 8K, at best, on construction costs and knocked an easy 30K off the resale value.
    Even though modern PT foundations are probably very durable, no one is going to buy them.

    They never made it to the market, I believe they were built as rentals only.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nobleea View Post
    There were a couple infills that went up in idylwylde recently. They put in pressure treated foundations. I cannot understand why.
    They saved maybe 8K, at best, on construction costs and knocked an easy 30K off the resale value.
    Even though modern PT foundations are probably very durable, no one is going to buy them.

    They never made it to the market, I believe they were built as rentals only.
    Wood foundations are fine so long as you have ways to keep water off them and proper drainage.
    There was no need to change that plaque. We are the City of Champions.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stevey_G View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nobleea View Post
    There were a couple infills that went up in idylwylde recently. They put in pressure treated foundations. I cannot understand why.
    They saved maybe 8K, at best, on construction costs and knocked an easy 30K off the resale value.
    Even though modern PT foundations are probably very durable, no one is going to buy them.

    They never made it to the market, I believe they were built as rentals only.
    Wood foundations are fine so long as you have ways to keep water off them and proper drainage.
    Like aluminum wiring though. Mostly fine but a bigger downside if problems do occur.

    I could see wood sometimes being superior to concrete in terms of its ability to flex.





    Wood foundation, a disaster waiting to happen? | Nordic Home Inspection


    “ I am not sure where it’s coming from, but we commonly hear concerns about the wood foundation from home buyers. I have even seen home buyers walk away from the purchase when I made them realize it was a wood foundation and not a poured concrete foundation as they thought it was.”


    “A 100 year life expectancy or not, I have personally inspected thousands and thousands of homes – several hundred of them with a wood foundation. So let me share some facts based on my experience:
    ...”



    https://www.nordichomeinspection.com...ing-to-happen/

    Last edited by KC; 09-06-2019 at 01:08 PM.

  5. #5

    Default

    Some of the original homes in Highlands were made with California redwood basements. They were very well made
    warm and very durable.

    Problem is that you cannot get quality old growth timber anymore and the pressure treated is pure garbage; full of knots, rot and does not last.

    No matter what you build, if the foundations are poor and the drainage system is not done right, you will have problems. Backfilling with frozen clay in winter will cause problems too.
    Last edited by Edmonton PRT; 09-06-2019 at 04:54 PM.
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