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Thread: Heritage Festival

  1. #1

    Default Heritage Festival

    I figured for equal opportunity billing this one deserves a spot on the raves.

    Loved the festival, again, and have been going since the 70's.

    For my time this is simply the best thing ever in Edmonton, and in places I've visited.

    I would imagine that if I was a first time visitor to Edmonton and stumbled upon this magic I would take root and never leave. Its that good. Beautiful setting, ambiance, energy.

    Through the years I can't go to this without having an ear to ear smile on my face after 10 minutes exposure. This ones good for what ails ya. A nonstop pleasure. An attempt at union in a chaotic divisive world. If only every day the world could walk shoulder to shoulder..

    Did I say magic? I will never forget the years of this festival as long as I live. Favorite moments live here.

    I would recommend for all to more regularly take in the performances at the Heritage amphitheatre a wondrous facility in its own right and enjoyable always. I can't describe the perfection of the backdrop, beautiful conifers, park, river over there and the setting rays of the sun. Surprisingly few take in the performances there and I'd suspect because they don't know much about it. For anybody that likes the cultural performances aspect a must. Also a reprieve from hours on your feet. I specifically recommend the 6pm performances.

    That said some difficulties as well;

    Very long ticket lineups(half hour) and I suspect because its hard to get enough volunteers?

    Trouble with sound bleed as pavillions compete with each other like a block of young adults firing up their car sound systems..personally I see no reason to pipe music between performances at volumes so loud it competes with venues where performances are actually taking place. Theres some chronic worst offenders out there that should be addressed. At one venue the performers kept pleading with the *soundman* to turn it down as the volume was causing shrieking mic feedback. He kept on turning it up for some odd reason. Some basic training in sound operation needs to occur.

    Info tents. Spread around but all very small tents now and basically invisible with no proper signage. Judging from the map we walked right by 3 of them without recognizing what they were.

    Signage. Wanted to go to the mexico pavillion. Walked by it twice apaprently, never saw it. pavillion signs need to be higher up so that people can see beyond the crowd that blocks view.

    Finally more room between venue and their stages would allow more efficient foot traffic. Some of the layout just asks for foot traffic jams.

    Commercial vendors should not be located in the throughways. They should be out of the way in inner fields.

    But those are fine points and a salute to the fantastic organization and hardwork that goes into this.

    Til next year then.

  2. #2

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    ^ Thank you, what a great post (RAVE!).

    I agree with you that Heritage Days is a uniquely magical event and experience to and for Edmonton.

    And one year I am going to gather up my courage, brave the crowds (something I do not handle well) and go in person instead of experiencing it vicariously!

  3. #3
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    This got buried in the Park & Ride thread, but my only gripe with the Heritage Festival was the lack of running water for washing hands. Considering that the portapotty usage and having to eat some of the food with your fingers is a grand recipe for "mudbutt", there were very few of those porta-sinks for a proper hand washing with soap.

    Other than that, this has always been a great festival, one that I always encourage out-of-town visitors to check out.

  4. #4

    Default Lesson in Harmony: Heritage Days Festival

    Lesson in Harmony: Heritage Days Festival

    Hicks on Six, Edmonton Sun
    Wed, August 8, 2007


    Heritage Days is always, despite whatever weather might be thrown at it, such a success.

    A friend, a very urban fellow, never misses Heritage Days. "You hear so much about the bad ethnic extremes - gang wars, illicit activities.

    "But we all know 99% of the ethnic people are honest, hard-working, proud Canadians. That's the core of good people you see at Heritage Days. It just makes you feel good."

    A new group of police from southwest division were assigned to Heritage Days.

    "They told me Heritage Days makes them feel human again," said festival director Jack Little.

    "They felt appreciated, as opposed to working nights on Whyte Avenue with abusive drunks. They call Heritage Days a 'mental holiday.' "

    Jack suggests that families have taken ownership of the Heritage Days festival. "Families see it as their festival, a place where children are welcome, where they can eat, enjoy the shows and there's no drunks."

    Heritage Days seems to have a palpable effect on ensuring Edmonton's multi-cultural harmony.

    Many of the city's newer arrivals are from Africa. What better place than Heritage Days to introduce themselves?

    African pavilions were well featured - Congo, Ghana, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Nigeria, Sudan, Uganda, Zimbabwe and many smaller communities in the catch-all Afrika OYI (OYI being a cheer).

    Some 340,000 to 360,000 Edmontonians came by, shared the food, talked, and learned about the cultures of these proud new Canadians.

    It has to affect the community as a whole. And we've been doing this for 32 years!

    -30-

  5. #5

    Default Edmonton's Heritage

    Edmonton's Heritage

    The Edmonton Journal
    Published: August 08, 2007 2:06 am


    Thank you to all the volunteers who made the 32nd annual Servus Heritage Festival a great success. Without the volunteers there would be no festival.

    The weather Friday night and Saturday morning presented unusual challenges that were overcome. Five new pavilions added a unique and different look to the festival. This, combined with five new countries added last year, is dramatically changing the face of the festival.

    Edmonton families are marking this festival as their very own. More than 400 opportunities to view entertainment in a non-alcohol environment, along with great food, make this so. Again, thanks to all who participated.

    Jack Little, executive director, Servus Heritage Festival

    -30-

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Heritage Festival

    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement

    I would imagine that if I was a first time visitor to Edmonton and stumbled upon this magic I would take root and never leave. Its that good. Beautiful setting, ambiance, energy.
    I feel the exact same way. You know I would love to see that sort of heritage carried over the entire year. For example, if we could see one country take centre stage with their national performances and items showcased in city hall one weekend per year. China week with dragon dances and food, South Africa week with costumes and drums, Japan week with sushi, fans and dancer...Russian week with...etc. What a great way to showcase our multiculturalism

  7. #7

    Default Re: Edmonton's Heritage

    Quote Originally Posted by djgirl
    Edmonton's Heritage

    The Edmonton Journal
    Published: August 08, 2007 2:06 am


    Thank you to all the volunteers who made the 32nd annual Servus Heritage Festival a great success. Without the volunteers there would be no festival.

    The weather Friday night and Saturday morning presented unusual challenges that were overcome. Five new pavilions added a unique and different look to the festival. This, combined with five new countries added last year, is dramatically changing the face of the festival.

    Edmonton families are marking this festival as their very own. More than 400 opportunities to view entertainment in a non-alcohol environment, along with great food, make this so. Again, thanks to all who participated.

    Jack Little, executive director, Servus Heritage Festival

    -30-
    Really agree with the bolded parts and a huge part of the enjoyment of this festival is not having a huge contingent walking around drunk looking for trouble if you so much as bump into them or look at them. in fact theres a whole element of society that apparently needs to drink heavily at almost any function or event and I immensely enjoy them not being around.

    As drinking has seemingly taken over every sporting event, most festivals, gatherings, its nice to see a non alcohol event.

    A salute to how the heritage festival has resisted the huge money grab, alcohol sales, that ruins the enjoyment of many other events for many people.

    Although I suspect mine is still a minority opinion, its one thats undoubtedly rising.

  8. #8

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    Anything different announced for this years Heritage Days saying as it's Canada's 150th Birthday. Is it going to be the same old traditional dancers that entertained people in the early nineteen hundreds and before, the same old yak on a stick at the food vendors. Or are they going to try to bring it into the 20th. Century with some food fusion, rap singers and some choreographed dancers with Justine Bieber being the Canadian contribution of our heritage.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  9. #9

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    ^if that's the plan, hope Canada didn't import from England Morris dancers back then... (not sure how PRT got in this photo )

    Last edited by moahunter; 21-06-2017 at 01:58 PM.

  10. #10
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    Looks like ol' Wiebo with suicide belts strapped to his legs.

  11. #11

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    ^ ^^ Looks like a typical afternoon at the Heritage Festival. The Morris dancers look like they are wearing Best Buy uniforms. The guy in the pink dress could just be a stand in. I said in my last post to bring it into the 20th century when it's now the 21st. century. This festival is so dated. Do people really think that if they eat some dim sum at 3.10 p.m. they are magically being steeped in Oriental culture. The festival is old, it's an old theme, an old premise. We know we are multicultural. There are restaurants, small stores, signs all over the city. If they want the festival to be an on going success for all age groups they are going to have to kick it up a notch. What teens want to go watch some medieval dancers when they can watch Beyoncé or Lady Gaga or Drake and their fabulous back up dancers on TV, YouTube etc. The only dancers with any energy at Heritage are the native dancers and Bollywood dancers. The rest, dancing round a pole with ribbons in their hands and wearing weird hats and leather pants, not so much.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  12. #12

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    Yeah! I mean, who wants to settle for a measly 350,000-400,000 people a year & attendance records being broken every few years? Clearly it's time for a complete revamp to destroy the intent & purpose of Heritage Days in order to turn it into a vaguely ethnic version of the K-Days midway, minus the rides!
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  13. #13

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    People go out of habit. Nice day, walk around the grounds, eat something they may not have everyday, take in what meagre entertainment there is. Similar to window shopping in the mall. Kicking tires but not really interested.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by noodle View Post
    Yeah! I mean, who wants to settle for a measly 350,000-400,000 people a year & attendance records being broken every few years? Clearly it's time for a complete revamp to destroy the intent & purpose of Heritage Days in order to turn it into a vaguely ethnic version of the K-Days midway, minus the rides!



    Good one.

    Top_Dawg face palmed when he saw Gems necro a ten year old thread, but this is turning into pretty good reading.

  15. #15

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    Wow, never noticed it was ten years old till mentioned. Just searched Heritage Festival and ran with it. Well, the thread is ten years old and the Heritage Festival is probably exactly the same as it was ten years ago (or 20,30) so it's still really a current thread.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  16. #16

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    135,000 disinterested people showed up on a single day last year, out of sheer habit, just to have something to do? Yeah, that sounds completely reasonable.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Wow, never noticed it was ten years old till mentioned.
    The carbon tax thread already showed us once today how poor your reading comprehension is, having you necro a thread is just cake.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  18. #18

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    If it ain't broke don't fix it . The heritage festival is great as is

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    People go out of habit. Nice day, walk around the grounds, eat something they may not have everyday, take in what meagre entertainment there is. Similar to window shopping in the mall. Kicking tires but not really interested.
    Uh, yeah, and you could say that about any annual event eg. people celebrate Christmas and watch the Grey Cup out of habit.

    I'm not a huge fan of Heritage Days myself, not crazy about being in a crowded park in scorching hot weather. But you can't just wish away all the people who DO like it by saying "Well, they're just kicking tires".

  20. #20

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    ^Now wishing it away, it just needs a re-vamp. What age group does it attract? Will the generations after us find it as appealing?. We know we are multi-cultural, do we need this type of festival to celebrate it. Is it now old hat to be saying "Hello, look at us were multi-cultural", then repeating it year after year the same way.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  21. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    ^Now wishing it away, it just needs a re-vamp. What age group does it attract? Will the generations after us find it as appealing?. We know we are multi-cultural, do we need this type of festival to celebrate it. Is it now old hat to be saying "Hello, look at us were multi-cultural", then repeating it year after year the same way.
    There is no central body that can change all the entertainment. Each country's pavilion is usually run by a respective non profit community group relying on volunteers for the most part. It's up to each pavilion to up the game as they see fit. The festival organizers can't do much to change things as they don't fully control each pavilion's entertainment nor food.

  22. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    ^Now wishing it away, it just needs a re-vamp. What age group does it attract? Will the generations after us find it as appealing?. We know we are multi-cultural, do we need this type of festival to celebrate it. Is it now old hat to be saying "Hello, look at us were multi-cultural", then repeating it year after year the same way.
    Let me see if I'm picking up what you're putting down here:

    All those diverse people, celebrating their uniqueness & sharing their diversity, ugh! Can't they just give it a rest already? We get it, you're 'ethnic', just like you were last year & the year before. Who cares if Canada is one of the most successful examples of multiculturalism on the planet, it's not like harmony between people is something to be striving for or something to be proud of. Just give it a rest & bring me some butter-chicken-poutine-on-a-stick, I gotta get to the hip-hop Bieber dance demonstration.

    Am I getting your vaguely racist tone & vision for the future of the Festival right Gem?
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  23. #23

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    Yes, like dim sum or butter chicken is real new to the Edmonton scene. The only vaguely racist tone your hearing is probably your own. Heritage Festival is old. A minute snapshot of different cultures. Their food, their dress, their dances all wrapped up in a three day festival. We live multi-culture every day in Edmonton. In our schools, universities, work spaces, in out many different restaurants, churches. It's all around us ever day, it has been for years and years. Is it even news anymore. The Festival is the same format with the same tired themes that it has churned out for 40+ years. Every year is like Groundhog Day. Switch up the format and get with the 21st century. Bring in multi cultural rappers instead of the same old same old. Put some east meets west in the food, some Dutch/Australian/Arab hip hop dancers. Even set up a couple of multi-cultural soccer games or basketball games. That would be a start.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  24. #24

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    So you wish it was less a celebration of Canadian multiculturalism & instead a more American-style melting pot?

    Kiiiinda missing the point of the Heritage Festival. And Canadian multiculturalism.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  25. #25

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    ^Oh get over yourself. Quit seeing stuff that's not there. Your itching to make it into a racist issue. Just goes to show your more interested into making it a racist issue than one of trying to make the festival more in tune with the times. How sad.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  26. #26

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    You're trying to make the Festival into something it's not & trying to make it seem like the Festival is not one of the most popular, well-loved, internationally-recognized & heavily patronized festivals Edmonton has in it's exact current form. Your entire mistaken premise for waking up this dead, 10-year-old thread is based on your own "seeing stuff that's not there".

    Heritage Festival is amazing in its current form & frankly if the current format discourages you & your ilk from attending I consider that a firm endorsement that the current setup is great.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  27. #27

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    ^Yawn.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  28. #28

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    Do more people show up to exhibit and volunteer and view every year? Yep.

    Is there any credible sense that it's peaked and wearing out its attractiveness? Nope.

    Seems like a keeper.
    I am in no way entitled to your opinion...

  29. #29
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    My wife and I are often not in town on the August long weekend. But we were last year so decided to spend the afternoon and early evening at the Heritage Festival. Hawrelak Park was packed as it always is with people of all ages and backgrounds mingling together and enjoying food, entertainment, and cultural displays.

    Most of the major summer festivals are not all that reflective of Edmonton's cultural and racial diversity. But the Heritage Festival most assuredly is. And the performances still have the ability to sometimes surprise and dispel a cultural or religious stereotype or two.

  30. #30
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    The Heritage Festival doesn't need a radical overhaul, but some tweaks here and there can help keep things fresh for annual attendees.

    1. The pavilion layout could do with a shakeup once in a while - most of the pavilions are in the precise same spots year after year after year. When I arrive from the NE bike parking, I know that the first ones I see will always be Russia and Germany, the Aboriginal site will always be at the SW end, and the Caribbean booth at the NW end. I was under the impression that they had a lottery system in place for pavilions to come and go but it seems most of them are exempt. C'mon, surprise us for once!
    2. Individual pavilions should continue to change and evolve their menus, performers and merchandise more often. Some do change but it seems less often than not.
    3. The food needs to be more culturally authentic. Edmontonian culinary tastes have evolved enough to such a sophisticated extent that there should no longer be a need to serve 57 versions of meat-on-a-stick nor the same bland honkified fare that can be obtained at your average mall food court. If the cuisine tends to be spicy or features a half-alive crustacean then by all means bring it all on!
    4. How about trying out some more entertainment activities, some of which can occur offsite - a pavilion parade, him and her beauty pageants, a multicultural music/dance jam, a beer/wine tasting event downtown, DJ parties at Whyte ave clubs or at the Shaw, for each pavilion displaying a small garden of their official flowers?
    5. Despite the protests of one poster here, the music and performances are being geared to younger audiences because I've found that many of them have significant hip-hop and EDM influences. That's fine as long as they don't stray too far from their cultural roots.
    6. More seating and shade, please. I for one am not overly fond of eating something whilst hunched over in the grass like a dog. Umbrella seating would be greatly appreciated by the sun-sensitive types.
    Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 22-06-2017 at 03:23 PM.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  31. #31

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    Umbrella Seating?

    What stops you from sitting under a tree, or going to the Huge Hawreluk Amphitheater which is right on site, in the middle of the park, is sun sheltered, and in essense is, and even looks like, a huge umbrella. Or going to the huge Shelter facility at the lake, or the cookhouse or other shelters through the park with large tables to sit at. In addition to the roughly 500 picnic tables in the park or put out at the festival located next to every pavilion.

    You seriously can't find shelter or a place to sit?

    I've heard some dumb things here but #6 above is the silliest thing I've ever read. The solutions are all over the place on site. Apparently you're blind and oblivious to finding them. Maybe get a guide dog.
    Last edited by Replacement; 22-06-2017 at 09:25 AM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  32. #32

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    ^Read reason #6 again in post #30. I'm sure if the poster could find a seat he would be sitting on it. Then read the rest of his explanation #6.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  33. #33

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    You mean the idiotic point that is among the stupidest complaints I've ever read here? Hawreluk Park is full of trees, its fully of tables and places to sit, its even full of tables and places to sit with shade.

    My lord, what special little snowflakes.

    Nearly half a million visits a year with no probs and that love the area, how its setup, and are largely repeat visitors.

    Anybody that can't find a place to sit at Hawreluk I wonder how they turn on a computer to ***** about it.

    The poster is clueless as well and doesn't even go to the festival apparently. Several of the benches near pavilion food HAVE umbrellas over them.

    I'm not usually this unpleasant but #6 is absolute horse drivel.

    That said sometimes they have to take umbrellas down due to wind conditions as that time of year we can see some intense storms. Just like anybody has to fold up a deck umbrella due to wind they have to as well at the park. Those things get just shredded in any considerable wind conditions.
    Last edited by Replacement; 22-06-2017 at 03:43 PM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  34. #34

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    ^Oh good lawd. He said he did not like to be hunched over on the grass eating something like dog. Is that not a good enough reason for you. If it was you who had that aversion we would be hearing about it until next year. I don't like breakfast in bed on the weekend, would rather be sitting at a table. Is that a bad thing?.
    The guys a grown man, he knows what he likes and doesn't. Your the biggest complainer on the board about the smallest of things. STFU.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  35. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    ^Oh good lawd. He said he did not like to be hunched over on the grass eating something like dog. Is that not a good enough reason for you. If it was you who had that aversion we would be hearing about it until next year. I don't like breakfast in bed on the weekend, would rather be sitting at a table. Is that a bad thing?.
    The guys a grown man, he knows what he likes and doesn't. Your the biggest complainer on the board about the smallest of things. STFU.
    I'm not sure what either you or SDM are blathering on about. The tables are there, all over the place. WITH umbrellas. A blind person without a seeing eye dog would have trouble walking very far without tripping over one.

    I complain about things that are reasonable to complain about and theres plenty to pick in this city. I don't complain about the best thing that this City ever does. Perhaps theres a difference.

    But as others have mentioned, and you're too thick to get it through your melon head, its fairly stupid to complain vociferously about the most popular per day festival that this city puts on. The vote is in, people LOVE the Heritage Festival. hardly anybody, except the people that don't go to it, and just want to ***** about it, complain about it... pffft.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  36. #36

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    ^You call me thick. Read your last paragraph. We get it, it's a very popular festival. Don't you think that at the times SDM goes there he may not be able to get a seat where he wants - and - this is because it is very POPULAR. Like I said, you call me thick. SMH.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  37. #37

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    It takes one bit of imagination, or a smidgen of familiarity with the park to not be able to find a place to sit even walking less than a block. As busy as the festival gets there are always places to sit at a table. I've been to the Heritage Festival 50 times. If I really want to sit down I can. If you even walk towards a table with a plate of food usually there are people sitting there watching entertainment that will move for you, or get up, as they recognize you want to sit.

    The park has hundreds of tables and in many area, for instance at the main facility by the lake the place is NEVER full. I've always managed to get a table there if I wanted to.

    No I don't think reality contorts itself to screw specifically with SDM and present a completely different festival experience with no tables or umbrellas.

    Its just something SDM is stating. Without evidently even going there. The no umbrellas comment was a dead giveaway for him not even being there in recent years.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  38. #38

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    ^You know, I'm no big fan of SDM and the feeling is mutual. I actually read his post and thought he put forth some good constructive thoughts. He does go to Heritage, you would have seen that if you had of actually read his post. His request at the end did not seem out of place mentioning more seating and shade because he did not like being hunched over on the grass and mentioned sun sensitives types.
    Let's fast forward back to you. I seem to think you mentioned you had IBS (or someone in your family did) or some such intestine disorder. What if you (or the person you know) wanted to use the washroom at Heritage and every time you went they were busy plus a line up. I'm sure the first thing you would bleat about is the place not having enough toilets. Now, what if everyone assured you they had more than enough toilets and you were just being a snowflake. I can get it that some people do not mind sitting on the grass to eat. I can also get it that people want to be at a table to enjoy their meal in the shade. What I can't get is someone like you making a big deal out of it.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  39. #39

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    What I can't get is people stating "someone like you" online.

    jk aside, barbs aside, I don't profess to know what people are really like or typecast them based on online posting. That you do speaks potentially more of yourself.

    Yes I am diagnosed Celiac, yes that can be a problem, but no it is not a problem at Heritage Festival which is usually one big amazing bit of planning and diligence. Complete with CONTINUOSLY serviced porta potties.
    The amount of effort required in keeping that beast running smoothly with 400k visitors is incredible. Its the best run thing in this City probably this province, and they have my unconditional support in that regard. I am in no way connected with the Festival, albeit have volunteered before. To me complaints about excellence are asinine. Complain about things that are incompetent. Like the COE in general.


    But heres a difference. People can plan where they choose to eat and what area and pick one that is perhaps less busy, and that has tables. Similarly I don't pick a lineup of 30 to go into to grab some food. I pick one that is less busy provided I like the food options. One where available tables are around. But with intestinal difficulty there is no choice, when one has to go, one has to go. I have complained for instance about DT on Sundays. That place is nuts. You basically have to know what places have washrooms that are available and open on a sunday and if they let you in. You can't plan that disorder. With intestinal disorders the discharge is explosive, too much information, I realize heh
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  40. #40

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    The Edmonton Heritage Festival is again about to return. The menus for each pavilion can be found in this PDF. The menu contains the disclaimer "Due to the nature of an outdoor festival, we cannot control food allergens. Pavilion foods may contain or have come into contactwith peanuts, eggs, wheat or other grains, nuts, dairy, soy and other food allergens. Please use your individual discretion to makean informed choice regarding whether to order any particular items. " The menu may be useful for those with allergies in trying to avoid them, but as the disclaimer says, your mileage may vary in avoiding them.

    If anyone wants to beat the lineup for food tickets on site, you can get twenty food tickets for $20 at the customer service desk at your local Save-On-Foods.

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    I believe you can also get advance food tickets at Servus branches and at TIX On The Square. I'll definitely buy 2 or 3 sheets. If I don't make it, I'll just donate them to the Food Bank.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  42. #42

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    ^
    Didn't know that, thanks SDM

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    http://edmontonjournal.com/entertain...ew-attractions

    For the first time, Liberia and Syria will have full pavilions offering food and cultural entertainment.
    the first wedding at the festival is expected to be held at the Syrian pavilion on Saturday at 5 p.m. Canadian newcomers Mostafa Khalaf and Manar Shakdouh plan to share their wedding with everyone in attendance.
    Khalaf immigrated from Syria three years ago and Shakdouh has been in Canada for a year. They met and fell in love in Canada and want to celebrate their wedding with Canadians during Canada’s 150th birthday year.
    Other countries with new, smaller pavilions featuring entertainment and crafts are Barbados, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), Trinidad and Tobago and Mongolia.

    As part of the Edmonton Mennonite Centre for Newcomers tent, the countries of Senegal, Ghana, Mauritius, Albania and Sierra Leone will display crafts and artifacts in a cultural marketplace.
    for the first time, Hawrelak Lake in the middle of the park will be used for the festivities. The pavilion for Australia will be a floating island on the water.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Food Bank in desperate need of donations

    http://edmonton.ctvnews.ca/food-bank...ions-1.3531968

    I usually buy more food tickets than needed so I can donate since I usually bike to the festival and prefer not to haul around canned goods, but maybe I'll reconsider this and bring some canned goods in addition to the unused tix.
    Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 03-08-2017 at 08:46 PM.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    This is an aside but something doesn't add up. Unemployment down, economy said to be improving and yet increased reliance on the food bank to the degree that shelves are empty and with much more use than when all of Fort McMurray was displaced from their homes.

    Sometimes the foodbanks are better indicators of relative prosperity than the typical trotted out numbers.

    Numbers served continues to rise. Its interesting.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

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    Passengers stuck waiting hours on Heritage Festival buses
    http://globalnews.ca/news/3652346/pa...estival-buses/

    Wow! Good thing I decided to bike to the festival as usual. I did consider using transit but there's really no park & ride routes near me. The park was packed and the lineups long, likely because most people knew the weather Saturday and today wouldn't be as nice.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    We would have walked, sitting on a bus for two hours is ridiculous.

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    370k on Sunday, wow! You simply cannot plan for that. I am surprised more people didn't walk, bike. This would be a great opportunity to use a water taxi from 2-3 locations.
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    Ooh, I would totally take a water taxi to Hawrelak. For the Heritage Festival or whatever.
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanO View Post
    370k on Sunday, wow! You simply cannot plan for that. I am surprised more people didn't walk, bike. This would be a great opportunity to use a water taxi from 2-3 locations.
    Uh, you totally can plan for that. Even without record attendance the wait is brutal. The city needs to get serious about getting people in/out of Heritage Festival or move it someplace with better transit *cough* Northlands *cough*
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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    Yes it's obviously time to move it. One little road in and out ain't cutting it.

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    News reports said part of the jam-up was private vehicles using the roads around Hawrelak Park to drop/pick-up passengers.

    Maybe it's time to partially close off Groat and other roads to allow designated bus runs for Heritage Days. The city already closes Groat for the World Triathlon for one weekend every summer.

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    ^ That's a good idea, actually, considering that the Groat Bridge will be under reconstruction starting next year.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Quote Originally Posted by North Guy66 View Post
    News reports said part of the jam-up was private vehicles using the roads around Hawrelak Park to drop/pick-up passengers.

    Maybe it's time to partially close off Groat and other roads to allow designated bus runs for Heritage Days. The city already closes Groat for the World Triathlon for one weekend every summer.
    Good idea. They have to do something, I'm just thankful I didn't go this year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
    Wow! Good thing I decided to bike to the festival as usual. I did consider using transit but there's really no park & ride routes near me. The park was packed and the lineups long, likely because most people knew the weather Saturday and today wouldn't be as nice.
    This year the UofA park & ride for Heritage Fest was located adjacent to the Health Sciences LRT station on 114 st.

    Previously the P&R would be at some obscure location west of the Jubilee. So now Health Sciences is a very attractive spot to head to Heritage as it can serve folks who live along the capital line.

    I work at the UofA hospital. On 11am Sunday I saw under a dozen people at a time board the bus.

    At 3pm buses were being instantly filled 3 at a time. They were even using the accordion buses.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    Even without record attendance the wait is brutal. The city needs to get serious about getting people in/out of Heritage Festival or move it someplace with better transit *cough* Northlands *cough*
    I agree. Hawrelak Park itself is good, but getting that many people in and out of there efficiently is not possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrOilers View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    Even without record attendance the wait is brutal. The city needs to get serious about getting people in/out of Heritage Festival or move it someplace with better transit *cough* Northlands *cough*
    I agree. Hawrelak Park itself is good, but getting that many people in and out of there efficiently is not possible.
    Northlands would be great, especially when a storm blows in as it did on Saturday..no place to run, an accident waiting to happen #crushed

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    I'm glad we went early on Sunday, then got out of there around 3:00 (or so). We were vastly outnumbered walking back up the hill; I'd say 80% of the people were coming down, and 20% going up. This was before the long lines of buses.
    They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

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    Let's not move it into a giant parking lot. Part of the beauty of the event is its location. You simply cannot plan for 1/3 of the city coming on one day and in past years when it was exceptionally busy you simply take more time, not a huge deal and certainly not a reason to move it.

    Work on logistics, work on alternative ways to get there.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gord Lacey View Post
    I'm glad we went early on Sunday, then got out of there around 3:00 (or so). We were vastly outnumbered walking back up the hill; I'd say 80% of the people were coming down, and 20% going up. This was before the long lines of buses.
    We always went early, even then, the line up for buses was crazy long.

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    ^Other than taking a bike, I guess the best option, if you like / don't mind walking and have the time, for a lot of people, might actually be just to LRT to UofA and walk down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IanO View Post
    Let's not move it into a giant parking lot. Part of the beauty of the event is its location. You simply cannot plan for 1/3 of the city coming on one day and in past years when it was exceptionally busy you simply take more time, not a huge deal and certainly not a reason to move it.

    Work on logistics, work on alternative ways to get there.
    I recall something about Northlands building a big grassy something that wasn't a parking lot. Hawrelak is a great park but it's a crap location for big festivals due to logistics and you know it.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    Hawrelak is a great park but it's a crap location for big festivals due to logistics and you know it.
    Agree wholeheartedly.
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    I'm of two minds when it comes to the Heritage Festival location.

    Hawrelak Park is a great setting and is just a short bike ride away for me. However, the transportation access can be an issue as we saw this past weekend, the Groat and Emily Murphy Park bridges are both inadequate for multi-use transportation, plus the mixture of rain and people can turn it into a Woodstock-like mud pit.

    Northlands has better transit and LRT access although it is farther away for me personally, plus better washroom access and more seating. However, the festival bowl was only a proposal as a replacement for the racetrack, so who knows if that will even fly. Plus if you're just gonna put it on a large parking lot, might as well just have it downtown.

    Way back when we thought the west LRT was going to run from the UofA to WEM along 87 Ave, I always liked the idea of an event-only LRT stop at Hawrelak Park. Not just for the Heritage Festival, but other events (Shakespeare in the Park, Symphony Under the Sky, Interstellar Rodeo, etc).

    Anyway, I lean towards staying at Hawrelak, but close Groat Road between Victoria Park Road and 87 Ave, then open it up not only for buses but also for bikes and pedestrians because the multi-use paths on the Groat Bridge and Emily Murphy Park Bridge are too narrow.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    As someone who has had to redirect hopeful types who remember the bus stop at the University Station, I was glad to see the clearly marked buses lined up beside the Health Sciences LRT station. It's much easier to direct people (and know that they won't get lost), if what you're sending them to is clearly visible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IanO View Post
    Let's not move it into a giant parking lot. Part of the beauty of the event is its location. You simply cannot plan for 1/3 of the city coming on one day and in past years when it was exceptionally busy you simply take more time, not a huge deal and certainly not a reason to move it.

    Work on logistics, work on alternative ways to get there.
    Totally agree. I love the use of Hawrelak for this. Plus it's current location is now part of its own heritage. On Saturday we simply parked at the Zoo and walked over to it. Easy. Crowds were light. The rain wasn't bad and while I didn't even have a hood or umbrella it was still nice being there.

    Crowd management could be done by posting a chart of attendance by hour and sample wait times. People would then adjust the their timing to favour better times.

    My only complain was the noise levels. I do wish they'd back off on the volumes which sometimes seem to be set high to drown out neighbours. Plus, it's like "second hand smoke", being imposed on innocent bystanders at the whim of other's thoughtless and selfish interests. I have the same complaint about last year's noise levels at the Taste of Edmonton. Don't go this year. At the whim of the band they imposed their music on the entire square. It was hard to talk to each other let alone talk with the food staff in their kiosks.

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    370K, that's just crazy. So was the line-up at Health Sciences - run very well though. But 370! That's one in every four in the entire CMA. Don't doubt based on transit ridership numbers, but w-o-w.
    ... gobsmacked

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    Incredible numbers given the rain on Saturday. Very successful event from numbers perspective.
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    Quote Originally Posted by H.L. View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gord Lacey View Post
    I'm glad we went early on Sunday, then got out of there around 3:00 (or so). We were vastly outnumbered walking back up the hill; I'd say 80% of the people were coming down, and 20% going up. This was before the long lines of buses.
    We always went early, even then, the line up for buses was crazy long.
    Not line up FOR the buses, line up OF buses.
    They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

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    Part of it is a simple fix. Don't let private vehicles drop and pick people up right next to the park. Cars cutting in front of buses. Cars just sitting there with their blinkers on just waiting for people blocking the street. Just too much traffic that doesn't need to be in that area.

    We went on Sunday in the morning and found no issues at that time with buses. In fact, our bus had empty seats going there and coming back at around 2 pm. ETS is generally well coordinated when it comes to an event like this but when you throw in the unpredictability of inconsiderate ding-dongs in their private cars and well then all bets are off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gord Lacey View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by H.L. View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Gord Lacey View Post
    I'm glad we went early on Sunday, then got out of there around 3:00 (or so). We were vastly outnumbered walking back up the hill; I'd say 80% of the people were coming down, and 20% going up. This was before the long lines of buses.
    We always went early, even then, the line up for buses was crazy long.
    Not line up FOR the buses, line up OF buses.
    No, we had no buses there at one point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by North Guy66 View Post
    News reports said part of the jam-up was private vehicles using the roads around Hawrelak Park to drop/pick-up passengers.

    Maybe it's time to partially close off Groat and other roads to allow designated bus runs for Heritage Days. The city already closes Groat for the World Triathlon for one weekend every summer.
    Late responding to this, and while all this would be helpful, the biggest part of the bottleneck is created by requiring ALL ETS routes to go into the park, directly, instead of exiting passengers in many locations adjacent to the park. Invariably many people every year ask if they could be let off at the park gate and just walk as the wait to get into the bus park is interminable. Similarly boarding from outside the park would save time. Not every route should have to travel right inside the park. Its possible to mitigate the all busses in one place jam.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

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    How odd that this great news wasn't more widely reported

    Edmonton's Food Bank surpasses fundraising goal for annual drive
    http://edmontonjournal.com/news/loca...ing-to-a-close

    Edmonton’s Food Bank has surpassed its fundraising goal of 50,000 kg of food for its largest annual food drive.

    As of Wednesday night, the drive has collected 52,694 kg of food, executive director Marjorie Bencz said.

    This was in large part due to the record-breaking crowd at the Heritage Festival on Sunday, Bencz said, with about 14,000 kg of food being collected on that day alone. Following the end of the festival, almost 11,000 kg have been donated at grocery stores and fire halls in the city.

    Bencz said it is a great feeling to pass the goal with two days remaining in the drive, especially because of the rising number of people using the bank. Because of the increase, staff have been struggling to keep the shelves full during the summer months.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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    Totally agree SDM. This is (was?) great news and deserved better attention.
    ... gobsmacked

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